May 9, 2019

Shorties (Essential Sci-Fi Novels by Women, Bjork Profiled, and more)

Dawn

Bustle recommended essential sci-fi novels by women.


The New York Times profiled Bjork.


May's best eBook deals.


The A.V. Club reconsidered Bloc Party's Silent Alarm album.


BuzzFeed recommended recently published books by indie presses.


My Brightest Diamond visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Vancouver Is Awesome recommended literary retellings.


John Darnielle discussed the new Mountain Goats album, In League with Dragons, with Paste.


The New York Times examined the impact of Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, on literature.


NUVO interviewed Strand of Oaks' Tim Showalter.


Literary Hub ranked poet biopics.


Garcia Peoples shared two cover songs at Aquarium Drunkard.


Full Stop interviewed author Mark Doten.


Stream a new Mikal Cronin song.


The Creative Independent interviewed poet Robert Gluck.


Stream a new song by Black Mountain.


Book Riot recommended memoirs about mental illness.


NYCTaper shared a recent performance by Headroom.


Damian Barr discussed his debut novel, You Will Be Safe Here, with Literary Hub.


Stream a new song by Ada Lea.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us





May 8, 2019

Shorties (The Adventures of Augie March Adapted for the Stage, the State of Modern Protest Music, and more)

The Adventures of Augie March

Saul Bellow's novel The Adventures of Augie March has been adapted for the stage.


Paste examined the recurring themes in modern protest music.


May's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer


C. M. Kushins discussed his book, Nothing's Bad Luck: The Lives of Warren Zevon, with PopMatters.


The finalists for the 2019 Locus Awards for science fiction and fantasy have been announced.


Stream a new song by Pixx.


Vulture profiled author Samanta Schweblin.


Exclaim! interviewed singer-songwriter Craig Finn.


Stylist recommended books to combat your eco-anxiety.


Stream a new IDLES song.


Vulture recommended the best books in translation from the past five years.


Stream a new Sinkane song.


Vulture recommended May's best new books.


Curt Kirkwood talked to BrooklynVegan about the Meat Puppets' original lineup reunion.


Gustavus interviewed author Dorthe Nors.


Stream a new song by Small Crush.


The New York Times Style Magazine examined the state of current historical fiction.


Foals visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


Critics and editors discussed the state of book reviews with BookMarks.


Stream a new Olden Yolk song.


The Millions interviewed author Joshua Denslow.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Lindsay Drager's novel The Archive of Alternate Endings.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 7, 2019

Sassafras Lowrey's Playlist for Hir Novel "Healing/Heeling"

Healing/Heeling

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Sassafras Lowrey's innovatively told memoir-in-essays Healing/Heeling is both heartbreaking and heartwarming in the tales of hir childhood abuse and the redemption ze found while working with dogs.

Michael Thomas Ford wrote of the book:

"Merging the mechanics of dog handling courses with the intensely personal story of how relationships with dogs have shaped hir life, Sassafras Lowrey has created a new kind of memoir, both deeply engaging and emotionally devastating. Combining poetry and prose, ze explores the themes of queerness, family, and the deep bond between humans and dogs with raw honesty and grace."


In hir own words, here is Sassafras Lowrey's Book Notes music playlist for hir memoir Healing/Heeling:



Not Ready To Make Nice - Dixie Chicks

This is my go-to angry song that really touches on some of the feelings of loss and anger that I tried to capture into the collection. I don't think that this is an angry book but it is a book that grapples with big feelings. This is a song about living unapologetically, and not changing because someone thinks you should. Amen.

Burning Bridges - Chris Pureka

Fun fact at nineteen I almost tattooed the chorus “rats in the walls” from this song up my ribs. Ultimately I’m glad I didn’t, but I love this song and the way it so fully captures failed relationships and heartache of trying to figure out how to build a life without all the right pieces, without the right materials and people and watching it crumble. That’s a lot of what the earlier pieces in this collection are grappling with.

A Dream Is A Wish: Disney’s Cinderella

I’m a big believer in dreams and magic (I’m also a Disney fanatic but this book doesn’t have anything to do with that). Specifically dogs have been the primary figures in all of my dreams (and many of my nightmares) and this song is a fun feel good reminder of the importance of following your dreams. I also might have sung this song out of tune on repeat as a first grader when I brought my first dog home.

I didn’t - Amy Ray

We can heal but the scars remain. Those healed over scars and trigger points were a focal point of what I was trying to give voice to when writing this collection. We carry the scars with us into our new lives, into new relationships and I think this song captures that really well.

That Summer - Garth Brooks

This song is actually mentioned briefly in the book! It’s a song about a teenage boy and an older woman and a love affair they have together one summer. It’s a complicated song in a contemporary understanding of and and consent but I am including it on the playlist because as a baby lesbian the summer before I was outed, the summer before I was homeless I played this song on LOOP headphones plugged into my discman while working in the sun painting dog agility equipment. I really identified with this song and the teenage boy (plus or minus a pronoun) as a young dyke deeply in love with the older women I trained dogs with.

Alanis Morissette - You Oughta Know

This song played a lot the summer of 2001 when I was living in a crappy Southern city in a bad relationship falling so briefly in love with a dog to try to heal wounds that were still so fresh and the awful relationship that eighteen year old me thought was as good as I deserved, that eighteen year old me thought was maybe love. These are some of the stories that come to life in Healing/Heeling so I had to include this song on a playlist.

Rural Faggot - Amy Ray

I grew up on the edge of suburbia and the edge of rural. I grew up listening to country and fled to the city when I came out. Country and queerness felt completely incompatible for me, and it wasn’t just about how I felt I was shown explicitly and violently that the communities where I came form no longer wanted me. The first time I heard Rural Faggot I had to stop and catch my breath, it was like someone had recorded song that talked about the worlds I came from - the rural ones and the queer ones.

The Angels Are Crying - Peter Noone

Ironically this was my favorite song in middle school. I’m not sure what that says about me as a pre-teen, probably that I had a LOT of unexamined trauma, not to mention foreshadowing to becoming homeless as a teenager. In this book I am touching on the failings of humans, and the way that (dog) angels I believe are always with me.

Iowa - Dar Williams

This song is on the Healing/Heeling playlist only because reminds me of the drive cross country from NYC to Portland Oregon that my partner and I made (with our 3 dogs and 3 cats) specifically to meet the medical needs of our two biggest dogs, another story that is part of this collection. We were staying the night in the largest truckstop in America on I-80 when this song came on Pandora and it just made me laugh

Mean - Taylor Swift

This is a real feel good song for me. It’s a song about overcoming where you come from, and leaving those mean people behind to pursue your own life. People who don’t believe in you, who don’t believe in your vision just don’t deserve you and have no power over you and the life that you are building for yourself.

Let It Go - Disney’s Frozen

Cheesy? Yes perhaps a little, but I have no shame in my love of FROZEN. Also I don’t think there is a better theme song for reclaiming your life and rebuilding it on your own terms which is exactly the trajectory of stories in Healing/Heeling. Sorry not sorry if this song gets stuck in your head!

The Dance - Garth Brooks

I have lyrics from this song tattooed on my leg. It was one of the first tattoos I got: “I could of missed the pain but I’d of had to miss the dance.” I had it tattooed in (now blurring) cursive surrounding the course map for a dog agility course, an experience that I reference in the collection. This is a song about love and loss and longing and the pain being worthwhile. The perfect song to wrap up this playlist with.


Sassafras Lowrey and Healing/Heeling links:

the author's website

Largehearted Boy playlist by the author for A Little Queermas Carol
Largehearted Boy playlist by the author for Lost Boi


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (Ani DiFranco on Her New Memoir, A Reconsideration of the Cure's Disintegration Album on Its 30th Anniversary, and more)

No Walls and the Recurring Dream

Ani DiFranco discussed her new memoir, No Walls and the Recurring Dream, with Morning Edition and Rolling Stone.


The Atlantic reconsidered the Cure's Disintegration album on its 30th anniversary.


May's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Chaos by James Gleick
Clandestine by James Ellroy
The Quiet American by Graham Greene.


Stream a new song by the Minus 5.


Electric Literature recommended books about survival.


Pitchfork profiled Joni Mitchell through her music.


Refinery29 and Book Riot recommended books for Mother's Day presents.


NPR Books reviewed Vivien Goldman's new book, Revenge of the She-Punks: A Feminist Music History from Poly Styrene to Pussy Riot.


Ted Chiang discussed his story collection, Exhalation, with Electric Literature.

The A. V. Club reviewed the book.


The Los Angeles Times profiled cartoonist Jaime Hernandez.


Renee Nault talked to the CBC about her graphic novel adaptation of The Handmaid's Tale.


Qrewcial profiled musician Oh Land.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Matthew Norman.


The San Francisco Chronicle profiled author T.C. Boyle.


CBC Books recommended recently published Canadian comics.


Mac DeMarco covered Feist's "One Evening."


PopSugar shared an excerpt from Karen DiStefano's memoir, What A Body Remembers.


Stream a new song by Sam Cohen.


The Guardian profiled author Barry Lopez.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 6, 2019

Dmitry Samarov's Playlist for His Book "Music to My Eyes"

Music to My Eyes

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Dmitry Samarov's Music to My Eyes, currently available in a signed and numbered limited edition of 800, is an honest and moving account of indie music, its fans, and its venues in both words and art.

Luc Sante wrote of the book:

"If Iggy Pop hadn't gotten there first, Dmitry Samarov might have called this book I Am the Audience. With its evocative drawings, honest reactions, and intermittent slices of memoir, Music to My Eyes conveys a palpable sense of the community of music--its haphazard venues, its marginal economy, its shifting career paths, its highs and lows. Samarov is loyal but not uncritical, sad and funny pretty much at the same time, and passionately in need of music, which always makes him ready for the next thing, whatever it might be."


In his own words, here is Dmitry Samarov's Book Notes music playlist for his book Music to My Eyes:



I used sketches of people playing music over the past thirty years as a jumping-off point for all the writing in this book, so, without these and hundreds of other songs, the book wouldn't exist. The numbers I chose for the list are by no means definitive, or necessarily my all-time favorites, but they are a representative sample of the music which inspired (and continues to inspire) my writing and art. I can't imagine making anything without a soundtrack.


The Lemonheads

"Hate Your Friends"— The Lemonheads

In the mid-90s, as a young cabbie in Boston, I gave a ride to businessman who turned out to be Evan Dando's dad. Upon learning this, I promptly told him that everything The Lemonheads put out after Hate Your Friends sucked. What an asshole! Looking back, I can't believe the man paid for the fare and didn't smack me in face...

A couple years ago, I was back in Boston and saw Dando play a couple songs the last week a legendary club called t.t. the bear's was open. I didn't recognize him till he started singing. I don't know why I'd been so confident of my expertise on the guy's discography all those years back. I barely know a thing about the man and his music at all.


Minibeast

"Oxygen Thief"— Minibeast

Getting to see Peter Prescott's current band, Minibeast, in Chicago after a last minute text from a friend last summer, was a great bit of bittersweet serendipity. I never thought this band would tour, it seemed like a one-man bedroom project kind of thing. But seeing Pete on stage with a killer rhythm section, unleashing that mighty yawp, brought back memories of seeing his old bands — Kustomized, Mission of Burma, Volcano Suns, and the Peer Group. But it wasn't a retread or nostalgia, just a kind of hat tip to the past as he plowed forward without a net into the future. The worst thing any artist can do is live off past glory; Prescott is much too restless to fall into that trap.


Eleventh Dream Day

"Tarantula"— Eleventh Dream Day

Had I grown up in Chicago, I'd have been hipped to Eleventh Dream Day much sooner, but I've been a fan ever since I saw guitarist Rick Rizzo sit with Yo La Tengo at Lounge Ax sometime in the early '90s. The band is one of those local mainstays that everyone who loves them think should've been huge. But would we love them the same if they were playing arenas instead of grubby little clubs?

The branches of Eleventh Dream Day helped birth many other bands, a couple of which have since eclipsed their forebearer. But they'll always be close to my heart.


Robert Belfour

"Breaking My Heart"— Robert Belfour

I saw Belfour in the pouring rain in the middle of a field on the border of Wisconsin and Minnesota. He took forever getting his guitar in tune just the way he wanted. But once he got going, it was like a portal opening to an era decades and decades back. He had that indescribable feel that every great bluesman has and that millions of pretenders can't ever ape. It's like a direct line to the essence of human longing. I felt lucky to've been there.


Dex Romweber Duo

"Ruins of Berlin"— Dex Romweber Duo

Romweber is another one with access to the infinite. His duo with his sister, Sarah, was one of the best outlets for his particular genius. I'm glad I got to catch them a few times before her recent passing.


Fred Anderson

"Olivia"— Fred Anderson

When I was in art school in the early '90s, I picked up a Fred Anderson record whose title now escapes me. It's the one with him standing smiling in front of the Chicago skyline. I feel like he was one of the people who welcomed me to the city, even though I never knew him.

Many years later, only a few before he passed, I remember him greeting people at the door of his jazz club, the Velvet Lounge. So he was welcoming me once again. I love the tone he got out of his horn. It feels like it comes from deep, deep down somewhere. Grounded, yet still searching.


Ran Blake

"Nature Boy"— Ran Blake

Watching Blake struggle to walk to the grand piano, then completely transfix the entire room with his haunted, melancholy playing, was one of the more inspiring sights I've ever witnessed. Though his body was frail, his spirit was fierce. It was a testament to perseverance and a great demonstration of how much can be expressed with such limited means. He was just an old man playing a piano, but he could've slain armies with his sound.


Protomartyr

"Jumbo's"— Protomartyr

One of my favorite newer bands. They have a knack for mixing a bunch of old sounds into something of their own. Their frontman looks like a substitute teacher who overdid it at happy hour and forgot to go back to work. One of the great talker/singers going. I don't always know what he's talking about but never fail to get the gist from his tone.


Freakwater

"Great Potential"— Freakwater

For awhile I thought there was a conspiracy against my ever catching Freakwater live. Something would always go wrong — show sold out or an unexpected illness, it felt like it was never gonna happen. Then I finally saw them, then saw them again another three times in the following year or two. They write some of the sharpest and saddest songs I know and their simultaneous singing is a thing of ragged beauty.


FACS


"Anti-Body"— FACS

I've known a couple of guys in this band for twenty years or more. Not unlike Peter Prescott, who kicked off this list, Brian Case and Noah Leger are tireless explorers, never satisfied churning out carbon copies of what they've already done. This is what makes me excited to go see them play. I don't want to live, rather than relive, and I think they feel the same.


Dmitry Samarov and Music to My Eyes links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Largehearted Boy playlist by the author for Where To?


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Liz Phair's Forthcoming Memoir, An Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Comic, and more)

Liz Phair

Liz Phair's memoir Horror Stories will be published in October.


Popmatters reviewed the new comic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Freshman Force: New Party, Who Dis?.


May's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream: Stories by Harlan Ellison
The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy


Pitchfork interviewed singer-songwriter Bill Callahan.


Good Housekeeping recommended the best books of 2019 (so far).


L7's Donita Sparks discussed the band's new album Scatter the Rats with Weekend Edition.


The Dallas News profiled authors Elizabeth McCracken and Edward Carey.


Stereogum reconsidered St. Vincent's Actor album on its 10th anniversary.


Joyce Carol Oates reviewed Ted Chiang's new story collection, , at the New Yorker.

Like such eclectic predecessors as Philip K. Dick, James Tiptree, Jr., Jorge Luis Borges, Ursula K. Le Guin, Margaret Atwood, Haruki Murakami, China Miéville, and Kazuo Ishiguro, Chiang has explored conventional tropes of science fiction in highly unconventional ways.


Stream a new Sebadoh song.


Lauren Groff talked to the https://www.newyorker.com/books/this-week-in-fiction/lauren-groff-05-13-19 about her story in this week's issue.


Thou played a Tiny Desk Concert.


Electric Literature recommended books by queer Asian-American authors.


NYCTaper shared a recording of a recent Mountain Goats performance.


Big Other interviewed author Eugene Lim.


Adult Swim is streaming a new metal compilation.


Ottessa Moshfegh discussed her favorite things at ArtForum.


Stream a new Holy Ghost! song.


The Lily shared a conversation between authors Amy Tan and Celeste Ng.


The Quietus recapped April's best albums.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 4, 2019

May's Best eBook Deals

eBooks on sale for $1.99 this month:


Alissa Nutting Rumaan Alam


Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret by Judy Blume
Coco Chanel by Justine Picardie
Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie
Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay
Does the Noise in My Head Bother You? by Steven Tyler
The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
Here's to You, Rachel Robinson by Judy Blume
I Could Pee on This: And Other Poems by Cats by Francesco Marciuliano
I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can by Barbara Gordon
It's Not the End of the World by Judy Blume
Just As Long As We're Together by Judy Blume
The Lifters by Dave Eggers
Little Faith by Nicklas Butler
Manic by Teri Cheney
Neruda: The Biography of a Poet by Mark Eisner
Tampa by Alissa Nutting
That Kind of Mother by Rumaan Alam


eBooks on sale for $2.99 this month:


Helen DeWitt Clarice Lispector


45 Master Characters by Victoria Lynn Schmidt
Água Viva by Clarice Lispector
All Grown Up by Jami Attenberg
The Best American Mystery Stories 2018
Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch by Henry Miller
The Captain's Verses by Pablo Neruda
Collected Stories by Tennessee Williams
Crackpot by John Waters
Dark Star Safari by Paul Theroux
Elements of Fiction Writing - Scene & Structure by Jack Bickham
The Great Enigma by Tomas Transtromer
I Refuse by Per Petterson
J.R.R. Tolkien: A Biography by Humphrey Carpenter
Lightning Rods by Helen DeWitt
The Mother Tongue by Bill Bryson
Story Trumps Structure by Steven James
The Soul of a Butterfly by Muhammad Ali
Turtle Island by Gary Snyder
Visionary Women by Andrea Barnet
We Were Witches by Ariel Gore
Write Great Fiction - Characters, Emotion & Viewpoint: Techniques and Exercises for Crafting Dynamic Characters and Effective Viewpoints by Nancy Kress


eBooks on sale for $3.99 this month:


Rachel Cusk John Waters


The Country Life by Rachel Cusk
DIY MFA by Gabriela Pereira
Raw by Lamont "U-God" Hawkins
Role Models by John Waters
The Secrets of Story by Matt Bird


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - May 4th

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Clyde Fans

Clyde Fans by Seth

This 20-years-in-the-making body of work by Canadian cartoonist Seth has finally found its ultimate material form: a beautiful box set containing the 500 pages of the Clyde Fans series, originally developed through his Palookaville comics series. Seth's graphic novel takes us in a wide emotional journey of nostalgia, solitude, isolation, success and failure, work, one's attitude towards one's life and one's responsibilities.


This Place: 150 Years Retold

This Place: 150 Years Retold forward by Alicia Elliott

Long last, an extraordinary comic collection representing a broad range of Indigenous voices and recounting Indigenous stories of resistance, resilience, violence, and belief. With a beautiful forward by Alicia Elliott, author of the recently released, A Mind Spread Out on the Ground, these accounts reject Canada’s national story, generously shining a light on experiences long obscured illustrated by Indigenous artists.


Is This How You See Me: a Locas story

Is This How You See Me: a Locas story by Jaime Hernandez

As a much anticipated follow-up to Hernandez’ award winning graphic novel The Love Bunglers, this comic follows two middle-aged best friends as they revisit the formative punk scene of their youth. Using the past to comment on the present in this installment, Hernandez adds to his decades-in-the-making Love & Rockets world, replete with characters, relationships, heartbreak, and regrets that ring so true and feel so right.


Picture

Picture by Lillian Ross

As a staff writer for the New Yorker for seven decades, Lillian Ross documented with keen observation and attention. In this NYRB re-issue, Ross tracked the making of a movie: John Huston’s The Red Badge of Courage in 1951. We read about how movie politics can quickly turn a film from a promising project into a disastrous flop with eavesdropping gossip and insider know-how.


Moccasin Square Gardens

Moccasin Square Gardens by Richard Van Camp

Considered one of Canada’s greatest living oral storytellers, Richard Van Camp brings us a new short story collection that portrays the effects of colonialism in wildly different narratives. The futuristic stories lean towards horror and darkness, while still maintaining fresh humour and humanity.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 3, 2019

Shorties (An Interview with Sarah Rose Etter, New Music from Palehound, and more)

The Book of X

Sarah Rose Etter discussed her debut novel The Book of X with The Brooklyn Rail.


Stream a new Palehound song.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

The Current by Tim Johnston


Better Oblivion Community Center visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


BuzzFeed recommended four recently published books.


Paste recapped April's best albums.


Stylist recommended post-#MeToo books to read.


Brit + Co recommended books for spring reading.


Paste reconsidered the Stone Roses' self-titled debut album 30 years after its release.


Cosmopolitan recommended May's best books.


Stream a new Holly Herndon song.


Brit + Co recommended the best books for spring reading.


All Songs Considered recommended the week's best new albums.


Bookworm interviewed author Tayari Jones.


Stream a new song by Cate Le Bon.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Lynne Tillman.


Stream a new song by Calexico and Iron & Wine.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Juliet Escoria's debut novel Juliet the Maniac.


Stream a new Fujiya & Miyagi song.


Publishers Weekly recommended books where the narrator isn't the main character.


Literary Hub recommended books you may have missed in April.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 2, 2019

Rachel Cline's Playlist for Her Novel "The Question Authority"

The Question Authority

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Rachel Cline's The Question Authority is a compelling, haunting, and important novel.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"Nora is a beautifully crafted character. Late in the book, she comments on her own 'prickliness,' and the word is perfect. Nora is sharp and hard to get close to, and now, in her 50s, she's trying to understand how much of that is a reaction to Mr. Rasmussen—his behavior toward Nora but also what she knows about him and Beth and a handful of other girls."


In her own words, here is Rachel Cline's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Question Authority:



This novel is about one cranky grown woman’s struggle to understand who’s to blame for her best friend’s affair with their 8th grade teacher, and its aftermath, forty years later. Was the teacher the only bad guy? What about his wife? Where were the girl’s parents? Why didn’t the school do something? And for that matter what about the City, the cutlure, and all of human history? The narrator, Nora, has a lot of questions, and a limited time in which to find answers.

Only one or two of the songs below are actually referred to in the text, but they all have something to add, because this is a story that goes on and on, even after my characters are out of the frame.

Freeway - Aimee Mann

I doubt that Mann intended this song as a commentary on the 2008 stock market crash but, as one of the suddenly broke people listening to her “Fucking Smilers” record a lot that winter, what “you got a lot of money but you can’t afford the freeway” meant to me was: “you may still be rich by most Americans’ standards, but you’re screwed without health insurance!” And though I am not Nora, that is where her story starts in my novel: with a job settling lawsuits for the NYC Department of Education (the same job I managed to obtain in 2009).

Black Jack David - Loretta Lynn

Loretta Lynn no doubt heard this story of a sixteen-year old girl lured away from home by a handsome stranger when she was herself a young girl in Kentucky. It’s also the story behind the marriage between the teacher in my book and his much younger wife, who he picks up on a motorcycle ride through Appalachia in 1965.

Good Morning Schoolgirl - Junior Wells Chicago Blues Band

This blues classic, also memorably covered by the Grateful Dead, makes us all co-conspirators: “Tell your Mama and Papa, I’m a little schoolboy too!” (WINK WINK) I’ve been singing along with that lyric since I was a teenager, myself!

Stray Cat Blues - Rolling Stones

Another great song with terrible, terrible politics--so bad we even knew it, then.

I Don’t Do That Kind of Thing Anymore - Tracy Nelson

Though it has the raunchy, roadhouse vibe that usually made female subjugation sound like a party we all could enjoy, this track from "Tracy Nelson/Mother Earth (1972)” is actually a feminist anthem . The “kind of thing” the singer will no longer do enable her lover’s regression: “If I cling to the little boy, I lose the man.” Righteous!

Hey Nineteen - Steely Dan

Nineteen-year olds are legal, but the Dan have scruples, sort of… the hardest part for Becker and Fagen seems to be that the sweet young thing doesn’t know who Aretha Franklin is. Which is, of course, hard to bear.

King of the Road - Randy Travis

Here’s a song that you can enjoy without remorse. It celebrates only the pleasures of a rambling life. Randy Travis’s empty oildrum of a voice counterpoints Roger Miller’s “don’t pity me” lyrics perfectly. My character Bob Rasmussen could learn a thing or two from both these guys.

Young Girl - Gary Puckett and the Union Gap

This pop bauble was on the turntable at the first boy-girl party I attended (circa 1971) and I was soon a proud owner of the 45. It wasn’t until I caught wind of it on my car radio some forty years later that I took in the lyrics, which are possibly even more cringeworthy than “You’re Havin’ My Baby!”

Uncle Alvarez - Liz Phair

People remember Liz Phair for singing about sex, but this song about an unknown and unknowable family member is a gem. The line, “he’s not really part Cherokee-Indian” barely rhymes, is nearly unsingable, as well as politically incorrect, yet it sums everything up: This guy has concocted his own legend--just the sort of legend that seduces teenaged girls.

The Boat Family - The Roches

RIP Maggie Roche, you genius. I can’t explain this song, but its implied questions remind me of Nora (my narrator)’s: what part of the world’s pain am I responsible for? In light of my own privilege, what of my own pain is even worth mentioning? Is chocolate allowed? Must soybeans be so sad?

Motherless Children - Steve Miller Band

An eerie rock’n’roll version of a folk song credited to Odetta, but really a good deal older. Heard through the lens of my book, the lyric “Some people say/a sister will do” takes on a particularly dark tone, but I really include it here for the last verse, which describes for me where the child molesting teacher lands, forty years later:

I was lookin' for some place to plead my case
And I'm standing here all alone
I was framed, the times they have changed
And I don't know where I'm goin'.

Omie Wise - Doc Watson

A haunting, blame-the-victim, classic murder ballad: "Fool-like she met him at Adams’s Spring!"

Age Ain’t Nothin’ But a Number - Aaliyah

And lastly, danceable proof that in the girl’s mind she’s making her own choices and owning her own lust.


Rachel Cline and The Question Authority links:

the author's website

Washington Post review

Los Angeles Review of Books interview with the author
Red Book Star-Revue interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (Erin Lee Carr on Her New Memoir, An Interview with Craig Finn, and more)

All That You Leave Behind

Erin Lee Carr discussed her father, David Carr, and her new memoir, All That You Leave Behind, with Fresh Air.


The 405 interviewed singer-songwriter Craig Finn.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

I, Claudius by Robert Graves


The A. V. Club and Paste previewed May's best albums.


The New York Times, Refinery29, and Stylist previewed May's best books.


Stream a new song by Dark Morph ( a collaboration between Sigur Rós frontman Jónsi and Swedish composer Carl Michael von Hausswolff).


io9 profiled author Samuel R. Delaney.


Stream a new song by the National.


Literary Hub interviewed author Miriam Toews.


Mark Kozelek and Petra Haden covered "The Power pf Love" by Huey Lewis.


Cecil Castellucci talked to Publishers Weekly about her forthcoming graphic memoir Girl on Film.


VICE shared a guide to getting into the Cramps' discography.


Entropy interviewed poet CAConrad.


Vulture listed the best albums of 2019 (so far).


Entropy listed April and May's best small press releases.


The Raleigh News & Observer profiled John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author Balli Kaur Jaswal.


Stream a new Titus Andronicus song.


Book Riot recommended books for Asian Pacific American Heritage Month.


Stream a new Verdigrls song.


Mira Jacob discussed her graphic memoir with Literary Hub.


Billboard is streaming Oh Land's new album, Family Tree.


Roxane Gay has launched Gay Magazine on Medium.


Stream two new songs by the Glow.


PopMatters profiled the band Hop Along.


Soundlab ranked Wilco's albums.


The Georgia Straight profiled Lady Lamb's Aly Spaltro.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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May 1, 2019

Shorties (May's Best Books, April's Best Songs, and more)

The Organs of Sense

Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Millions, and TIME recommended May's best new books.


Gorilla Vs. Bear, BrooklynVegan, and NPR Music recapped April's best new songs.


eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Free Food for Millionaires by Min Jin Lee

eBook on sale for $3.99 today:

Plenty by Yotam Ottolenghi


Craig Finn shared an annotated map of places mentioned in his four solo albums.


BuzzFeed recommended books that capture the spirit of Washington, DC.


Stream a new song by Daughter of Swords (aka Mountain Man's Alexandra Sauser-Monnig).


Rolling Stone shared an excerpt from Robert Christgau's new book, Book Reports: A Music Critic on His First Love, Which Was Reading.


Indy Week profiled singer-songwriter John Vanderslice.


BuzzFeed shared Bernice McFadden's essay from the anthology What My Mother and I Don't Talk About.


Stream a new song by Mal Blum.


Paste recapped April's best books.


Stream a new song by Bleached.


The Guardian recommended books about psychotherapy.


Stream a new Penelope Isles song.


Book Riot recommended comics about mental health.


Stream a new Julia Shapiro song.


The Millions recommended essential graphic novels and memoirs about queer women.


Ploughshares discussed narrative form with authors Jane Alison and Ander Monson.


Book Riot recommended May's best books by British authors.


The Rumpus interviewed author Fatima Asghar.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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