May 14, 2018

Shorties (Michael Chabon on His New Essay Collection, Interpol Shared a Mini-Documentary. and more)

Michael Chabon

Michael Chabon discussed his new essay collection with the Guardian.


Interpol shared a Turn on the Bright Lights tour mini-documentary.


May's best eBook deals.


Grimes shared a working tracklist for her forthcoming album.


Amor Towles discussed his novel A Gentleman in Moscow with Boise State Public Radio.


Stream a new Lykke Li song.


Guernica features a new essay by Lynn Steger Strong.


Washington City Paper profiled the band Governess.


The English Kills Review interviewed author Rachel Lyon.


Stream a new La Force song.


Longreads shared a new Morgan Jerkins essay.


NME listed the most divisive albums of all time.


eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler


Cvlt Nation interviewed the duo Azar Swan.


Guernica features new Cari Luna short fiction.


Stream the trailer for the new Ursula K. Le Guin documentary.


My Modern Met shared portraits of New York's indie booksellers.


The Guardian shared an excerpt from Dave Haslam's memoir Sonic Youth Slept on My Floor.


Dave Zirin discussed his book Jim Brown: Last Man Standing with Weekend Edition.


Sheila Heti discussed her new novel Motherhood with Vox.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Amy B. Scher.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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May 11, 2018

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - May 11, 2018

Beach House

Beach House's new album 7 is the week's most anticipated album as well as my personal favorite.

Illuminati Hotties' Kiss Yr Frenemies, La Luz's Floating Features, The Sea and Cake's Any Day are other new releases I can recommend.

Vinyl reissues of two Tom Waits albums (The Heart Of Saturday Night and Nighthawks At The Diner) are out this week.


This week's interesting music releases:


Bad Wolves: Disobey
Beach House: 7
Buck Owens: The Complete Capitol Singles: 1967-1970
The Body: I Have Fought Against It, But I Can't Any Longer
Charlie Puth: Voicenotes
Del the Funky Homosapien and Amp Live: Gate 13
Eminem: Revival [vinyl]
George Jones: Live in Texas 1965
Gin Wigmore: Ivory [vinyl]
Glenn Frey: Above The Clouds: The Collection (3-CD box set)
Illuminati Hotties: Kiss Yr Frenemies
Jerry Garcia: Before the Dead (4-CD box set)
Jess Williamson: Cosmic Wink
John Prine: The Tree of Forgiveness [vinyl]
King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard: Polygondwanaland fuzz Club Version [vinyl]
La Luz: Floating Features
Loreena McKennitt: Lost Souls [vinyl]
Luke Winslow-King: Blue Mesa
Marco Beltrami: A Quiet Place (soundtrack)
Mark Kozelek: Mark Kozelek
Max Richter: The Blue Notebooks (reissue)
Ry Cooder: The Prodigal Son
The Sea and Cake: Any Day
Sevendust: All I See Is War
Serge Gainsbourg: 90 Sequences (limited edition box set)
Shirley Ellis: Three Six Nine! - The Best Of Shirley Ellis
Simian Mobile Disco: Murmurations
Spacemen 3: Playing With Fire (reissue) [vinyl]
Sparks: Exotic Creatures Of The Deep (reissue) [vinyl]
SSION: O
Strung Out: Black Out the Sky
Tom Waits: The Heart Of Saturday Night (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Waits: Nighthawks At The Diner (reissue) [vinyl]
Various Artists: Black Panther The Album Music From And Inspired By [vinyl]
Various Artists: Burning Britain: A Story Of Independent UK Punk 1980-1983
Various Artists: Guys Go Pop, Vol. 3 1963-1965
Various Artists: Planet Mod: Brit Soul, R&B, and Freakbeat from the Shel Talmy Vaults
Various Artists: Stack Of Soul - R&B Classics From The Original Home Of Soul
Wajatta: Casual High Technology


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily book and music news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

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Atomic Books Comics Preview - May 11, 2018

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics, graphic novels, and books.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. He also runs the Mutant Funnies Tumblr.

Atomic Books has been named one of BuzzFeed's Great American Bookstores, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Dead in the Water: The Steve Buscemi Activity Book

Dead in the Water: The Steve Buscemi Activity Book
by Belly Kids

Finally! The world's most beloved character actor gets his own activity book! Bright! Colorful! And every bit as quirky as Buscemi himself. Is there a find Steve activity? You bet! How about a jumble? Of course! There's coloring, and a page where you have to figure out his drunken best man's wedding toast! Dead In The Water is THE activity book of the year! From the same people who brought you The Wisdom Of Nicolas Cage and Hip Hop Pick-Up Lines. So you know, it's solid.


Rock Steady: Brilliant Advice From My Bipolar Life

Rock Steady: Brilliant Advice From My Bipolar Life
by Ellen Forney

Forney's much-anticipated sequel to her acclaimed comic memoir Marbles is a bipolar survival guide loaded with personal stories and advice. This book is a mental health must have.


Sherlock Frankenstein And The Legion Of Evil

Sherlock Frankenstein And The Legion Of Evil
by Jeff Lemire / David Rubin

Jeff Lemire continues to expand his utterly immersive and compelling Black Hammer universe with this charming story of a Black Hammer villain. Lemire is easily one of the best writers in comics right now. And Black Hammer is an argument why he maybe should be put in charge of, say, the DC Comics Universe once Scott Snyder's Metal, etc. has run its course.


Tiny Report #5

Tiny Report #5
edited by Robyn Chapman

This review zine gives the what's what on the mini-comics scene. But this full color (with fold-outs), ambitious issue not only features a ton of reviews of books you'll want to track town, it also includes very large, in-depth interviews with artists Eleanor Davis (one of the most important cartoonists working today) by Robyn Chapman and Mike Diana (one of the most controversial cartoonists ever, if you don't know him, he actually went to jail for his art) by Haleigh Buck. Tiny Report is one of those zines you'll want to read cover to cover because you get so much out of it.


Vinyl Vagabonds Presents

Vinyl Vagabonds Presents
by Eric Gordon / Sara Gordon

My favorite vinyl-collecting zinesters have turned out this really interesting new... I'm gonna call it a "zine." It's a part zine/part comic flipbook hybrid. But the comics aren't traditional comics - what they've done is taken photos from common record albums and drawn over them and turned them into comic strips - a sort of record-collecting fumetti - in a CD-sized format (clever!). I think they may have just discovered a new form. Or maybe I saw it as a kid in National Lampoon? Either way, it's way fun. One side deals with the struggles of record shops, and flip it over and you'll get a look at record collectors. Great, weird stuff that anyone who owns music in vinyl format will love.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Mutant Funnies


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (New Christine Schutt Short Fiction, Joel Selvin on His New Grateful Dead Book, and more)

Fare Thee Well: The Final Chapter of the Grateful Dead's Long, Strange Trip

Granta features a new short story by Christine Schutt.


Joel Selvin discussed his new book Fare Thee Well: The Final Chapter of the Grateful Dead's Long, Strange Trip with Rolling Stone.


May's best eBook deals.


Ceremony's Ross Farrar ranked the band's albums at Noisey.


The Believer interviewed author Dan Sheehan.


Francoise Hardy discussed the music that has informed her life at Pitchfork.


Paste interviewed cartoonist Hope Larson.


Stream a new Courtney Barnett song.


Leslie Odom Jr. discussed his favorite books at Vulture.


GQ interviewed Stephen Malkmus.


Julia Fine discussed her debut novel What Should Be Wild with Chicago magazine.


R.I.P., Scott Hutchinson of Frightened Rabbit.


The Creative Independent interviewed Elizabeth Catte about writing history in the present tense.


Stream a new Bill Baird song.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author Melissa Broder.


The Independent interviewed Lo Moon's Matt Lowell.


The Guardian profiled author Jesmyn Ward.


Stream a new song by Super Furry Animals frontman Gruff Rhys.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from David Duchovny's new novel Miss Subways.


Stream a new Maps & Atlases song.


The Portalist examined the fiction of Joanna Russ.


Stereogum shared unlikely covers of the Rolling Stones' "Miss You" on the song's 40th anniversary.


The nominees for the 2017 Shirley Jackson Awards have been announced.


Rolling Stone profiled the musical duo Beach House.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Paul Theroux's new book Figures in a Landscape.


Stream a new song by Dawes.


BOMB interviewed author Eileen Pollack.


The Quietus interviewed members of the band ILL.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Sheila Heti's new novel Motherhood.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 10, 2018

Steven Hyden's Playlist for His Book "Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock"

Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Steven Hyden's Hammer Of The Gods is part memoir, part testament to the power and longevity of classic rock.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Hyden's critiques are consistently on target...he has created a hilariously opinionated personal history of classic rock that should resonate with his fellow genre enthusiasts."


In his own words, here is Steven Hyden's Book Notes music playlist for his book Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock:



My book is about classic rock, and classic rock mythology, and what it's like to see larger-than-life heroes you imagined were immortal fade away. There have been a lot of books about classic rock, and there will be many more after this one. But I don't recall ever seeing a book that looks at this music from the perspective of someone who wasn't there to witness it unfold in real time. I learned about the legends of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Keith Richards, Stevie Nicks, and Pete Townshend from classic-rock radio and the Rolling Stone Record Guide. When I was kid, these musicians weren't really people to me; they were like comic-book characters. Hammer Of The Gods was my Batman. I actually think that's how the majority of the people who still care about this music first experienced classic rock. We're not baby boomers who went to Woodstock. We're Gen-Xers who watched Oliver Stone's The Doors and wanted some of that overcooked mythology for ourselves.

If you relate to any of what I just typed, Twilight Of The Gods is for you.

Pink Floyd, "The Great Gig In The Sky"
Perhaps you've noticed the subtle Dark Side Of The Moon homage on the cover of my book. Along with Led Zeppelin IV, Dark Side played an absolutely pivotal role in turning me into a classic-rock head when I was a teenager in the '90s. This song makes death sound sexy, and sex sound like death, which is exactly how teenagers already feel about death and sex.

Peter Frampton, "Do You Feel Like We Do"
I love live albums. I feel like that's probably a contrarian opinion, but I really valued the documentary aspects of records like Frampton Comes Alive! as a kid who came to classic rock 20 years after the fact. I like hearing the crowd, and imagining what it was like to be at the SUNY Plattsburgh college campus on Nov. 22, 1975, when this version of "Do You Feel Like We Do" was recorded. When the song gets quiet during Frampton's endless talkbox solo, you can hear the stoners buzzing in the distance, like lightning bugs.

Bruce Springsteen, "Wreck On The Highway"
A lot of my book was written in 2016, when Bruce and the E Street Band was on The River anniversary tour. I saw three gigs on that tour, which was amazing, even though the setlists were mostly the same. At the start of each show, Bruce did this rap about how The River was ultimately a record about the passage of time, which is a theme that definitely influenced Twilight Of The Gods. My book talks about classic rock but it's really about how to reconcile your own eventual death. But since that's a heavy subject for a rock and roll book, as well as a rock and roll album, you have to make sure the audience is having a good time first before you hit them with the death stuff. The River has so many great party jams, and then it ends with this heartbreaker.

The Allman Brothers Band, "Ramblin' Man"
I love "life on the road" songs. My book has a chapter talking about the paradox of "life on the road" songs, which is that they're cautionary tales that actually make being in a band seem awesome. Bob Seger's "Turn The Page" is the no. 1 "life on the road" song, but "Ramblin' Man" is probably a better example of my thesis, because the guy in this song is clearly an irresponsible S.O.B., and yet Dickie Betts' exuberant vocal and incredible guitar runs make the guy's life seem like the freaking best.

Ozzy Osbourne, "Mr. Crowley"
One of my favorite topics to research was Aleister Crowley. All I really knew about him going into the writing of The River was 1) Jimmy Page loved him so much that he bought his spooky house; and 2) This lovably cheesy track from Ozzy's solo debut, Blizzard Of Ozz. But Crowley really was the original rock star. So much behavior that we associate with rock clichés originated with Crowley — at least he was the one who justified his decadent behavior as a path to spiritual enlightenment. If he had been born 50 or so years later, Crowley would've been a member of the Doors.

Neil Young, "Computer Cowboy"
One of my favorite chapters in the book is about good "bad" albums, which are the records in an artist's discography that everyone tells you are terrible but over time you convince yourself that those are actually the best records. Fans do this because you can only listen to acknowledged classics and respectable second-tier releases for so long. Eventually, you have to dig into the material that's largely misunderstood. Trans by Neil Young is a quintessential good "bad" album — it's as personal and idiosyncratic as Tonight's The Night or Rust Never Sleeps, but it has way more vocoder.

REO Speedwagon, "Keep On Loving You"
Fredric Dannen's classic 1990 book about payola, Hit Men, includes a chapter about how REO Speedwagon's Hi Infidelity became a priority for Epic Records over the Clash's Sandinista! because the band gave out Rolexes to the label's promotional staff. It helps to explain how so many faceless middle-American arena-rock bands sold millions of albums on the backs of power ballads in the early '80s. But then there's also the fact that my mom loved Hi Infidelity; it was one of the only tapes she owned, along with the Dirty Dancing soundtrack. The lesson is that a lot about classic rock is a scam and also transcendent.

The Rolling Stones, "You Can't Always Get What You Want"
Politicians have tried to co-opt classic rock songs for their campaigns for decades. But the twinning of classic rock and the Trump campaign in 2016 felt different. When the RNC held its convention in Cleveland, they actually put a guitar in its official logo. And then there was the bizarre use of "You Can't Always Get What You Want" at the end of Trump's bombastic nomination speech. This wasn't like Reagan trying to use "Born In The U.S.A." in 1984. That was an old guy trying to reach kids. Trump was an old guy talking to other old guys. Trump is actually a few years younger than Mick Jagger.

Phish, "The Squirming Coil"
I became a big Phish fan in mid-30s after hating them for 20 years before that. One day I realized that I hated this band without knowing much about them. When I checked them out, I realized that Phish was a post-modern classic rock band – they display equal amounts of reverence and irreverence for classic rock history and mythology. If you worship guitar solos, Phish is the rare modern rock band that will indulge you. But when Phish covers "Free Bird," they do it A capella style. That's when I realized that Phish was precisely the band that I had always been waiting for, even though they had been under my nose all along. My relationship with Phish basically has the same dynamic as Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan in You've Got Mail.

Wilco, "Either Way"
I knew I had to write a chapter on dad rock, which is a term I loathed for a long time before I learned to accept it, kind of like how people from the south learned to embrace the term "redneck." Dad rock generally is supposed to be a putdown, as dads have a terrible reputation in rock and roll, whether you're Harry Chapin or Kurt Cobain. In my book, I tried to trace the history of the term, and the best I can tell is that it derives from the British press of the mid-'90s. But it was popularized in America, I believe, by Pitchfork's negative review of an album I adore, Wilco's Sky Blue Sky, written by my friend Rob Mitchum. That album came out 11 years ago but I still bring up the review any time I talk to Rob.

Courtney Barnett, "An Illustration of Loneliness (Sleepless in New York)"
The overwhelming straight white male-ness of classic rock, which was enforced by gatekeepers in radio and music criticism for decades, becomes a major theme of the book in the back half. One of the great things about rock right now is how that stranglehold has been broken by a younger generation of women, people of color, and LGBTQ musicians. As I write this, the best writer of rock songs on the planet is Courtney Barnett, and this is her heartbreakingly sad (and hilarious!) take on the "life on the road" song.


Steven Hyden and Twilight of the Gods: A Journey to the End of Classic Rock links:

excerpt from the book

Portland Mercury review
Washington Post review

Beyond the Pond interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Samantha Irby on Books and Reading, A Conversation Between Liz Phair and Snail Mail's Lindsey Jordan, and more)

Samantha Irby

Samantha Irby talked books and reading with the New York Times.


Pitchfork shared a conversation between Liz Phair and Snail Mail's Lindsey Jordan.


May's best eBook deals.


Eleanor Friedberger visited the Paste studio for a live session.


Anomaly interviewed poet Tommy Pico.


NPR Music is streaming Bombino's new album Deran.


The Michigan Daily interviewed Charles Forsman about the television adaptation of his graphic novel The End of the Fucking World.


NPR Music is streaming cellist Mary Lattimore's new album Hundreds Of Days.


Bookworm interviewed author Leslie Jamison.


Paste profiled the band Wolf Alice.


Literary Hub's podcast interviewed author Rebecca Solnit.


Stream a new Wye Oak video.


Richard Lloyd Parry has been awarded the Rathbones Folio Prize for his book Ghosts of the Tsunami: Death and Life in Japan’s Disaster Zone.


Morning Edition interviewed singer-songwriter Inara George.


CrimeReads recommended psychological thrillers that focus on motherhood.


Rolling Stone interviewed singer-songwriter Steve Earle.


Stephanie Danler talked to Vulture about adapting her novel Sweetbitter for television.


Okkervil River played a Stereogum session.


Literary Hub recommended books for armchair travelers.


Stereogum profiled singer-songwriter Ryley Walker.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Elizabeth Tan's short fiction collection Rubik.


Stream a new Common Holly song.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 9, 2018

Rita Bullwinkel's Playlist for Her Story Collection "Belly Up"

Belly Up

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Rita Bullwinkel's short story collection Belly Up is a marvelous debut from a writer to watch.

Deb Olin Unferth wrote of the book:

"Bullwinkel's delightful, passionate stories of disturbance and worried words have the best kind of frenetic energy.""


In her own words, here is Rita Bullwinkel's Book Notes music playlist for her short story collection Belly Up:



I think of the stories of Belly Up as being after the same thing, but in different clothing. They have a wide variety of appearance on the page; some are short, and some are very long, and some use correct grammar, while others purposefully leave out parts of speech. One of the things that unites the collection, and that I've tried to emulate in this playlist, is a sense of haunting and outside of body-ness. Music is generally excellent at making one forget that they have a human form, which is a feeling I tried to get at in the first story in the collection, "Harp."

I love listening to music, though never while writing. While writing I only listen to silence or to my very fancy white noise machine (I recently bought an extremely expensive and effective one that is mainly marketed towards lawyers for use while speaking confidentially to their clients while they are in jail).

The expensive white noise machine is especially good at canceling out the sound of Bach being played on the violin in my living room, which is, perhaps, the default sound of my lived existence. My long time lover is classically trained violinist, and is in a constant state of battle with Bach pieces.

For whatever reason, I have always dated and surrounded myself with musicians. I've been dragged on countless tours, often sitting backstage, by myself, at large international music festivals. Because of this, when I reached for music to make this playlist I reached first for music written by friends, or music I've come upon because the person I am living with has toured with the band, and I liked the live set, and the way the music made me feel.

Belly Up is a baroque, genre-conflicted book, and so I haven't limited myself here to picking songs that would all be good for the same event. Lion Babe's "Rockets" shares the book's obsession with food and its consumption when the lyrics so eloquently mention "I'm like buttah on a lobstah" and "we eat fishes with the pasta." The sad and unwanted dog depicted in Arthur Russell's masterpiece "Eli" is, in my wildest dreams, a sister story to Belly Up's "Concerned Humans," which chronicles the emotional conflict of a snake who wishes it was a pear. And Ibeyi's "River" captures a sense of the undead that I pray some of the stories in Belly Up relate to. All of these songs make me feel like I am other than myself, and more than myself, at the same time, which is the feeling I always desire when reading. I can only hope that some of the feelings these songs incite are present in the book.

"River" by Ibeyi

"Hungry Ghost" by Hurray For The Riff Raff

"Eli" by Arthur Russell

"Rockets" by Lion Babe

"I Want a House" by Twin Sister

"Death Song" by Robbie Basho

"Miranda" by Angel Olsen

"A-Z of Music" by various artists including Will Epstein and Doug Poole

"This Is How We Walk On The Moon" by Arthur Russell

"Just A Cloud" by Lusine

"Dans Mon Quartier" by Riff Cohen


Rita Bullwinkel and Belly Up links:

the author's website

Kirkus review
Los Angeles Review of Books review
New Republic review

Hazlitt interview with the author
San Jose Mercury News profile of the author
Tin House interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Essential Miami Crime Novels, Stream Carla Bozulich's New Album, and more)

Carla Bozulich

CrimeReads listed essential Miami crime novels.


Tiny Mix Tapes is streaming Carla Bozulich's new album Quieter.


May's best eBook deals.


Elon Musk's favorite Grimes songs.


Town & Country recommended May's best books.


Stream a new song by LUMP.


UrbanDaddy profiled author Chuck Palahniuk.


Free Times profiled the band Bombadil.


Author Kevin Powers shared his recent reading with BookPage.


Stream a new MUNYA song.


Novelist Carys Davies recommended wilderness books at the Guardian.


The Quietus interviewed noise artist AJA.


Viv Albertine discussed her new memoir To Throw Away Unopened with Literary Hub.


Weaves covered the Arcade Fire's “Neighborhood #3 (Power Out)."


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Tommy Pico's new book-length poem Junk.


Stream a new song by Blushh.


BuzzFeed shared an excerpt from Rumaan Alam's new novel That Kind of Mother.


Turntable Kitchen shared three covers of Talking Head's "This Must Be the Place."


Michelle Tea on trying stand-up comedy at the age of 46.


Stream a new song by Petal.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 8, 2018

Joanna Cantor's Playlist for Her Novel "Alternative Remedies for Loss"

Alternative Remedies for Loss

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Joanna Cantor's funny and moving novel Alternative Remedies for Loss is an impressive debut.

Booklist wrote pf the book:

"A sharp and witty glimpse inside a functionally dysfunctional family, Cantor's first novel is heartbreakingly honest. Fans of Helen Fielding, Emma Straub, and Maggie Shipstead will appreciate Olivia's zest for life and capacity for personal growth. With a delightfully imperfect heroine, vibrant settings, and snappy dialogue, this is a whip-smart debut."


In her own words, here is Joanna Cantor's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Alternative Remedies for Loss:



Band of Horses, "The Funeral"

We meet Olivia Harris in a brief flash-forward: an autumn night in New York when she goes on an impromptu date with an older man. In the wake of her mother's death, Olivia is grief-stricken and in a pretty dark place. She's feeling isolated from her family, angry, reckless—and capable of doing just about anything.

Radiohead, "Fake Plastic Trees"

The Harrises travel to India—a trip Olivia had planned to take with her mother. But when Olivia's father invites June, a woman he's begun dating, to join the family trip, things take a weird turn. Though Olivia's brothers aren't happy about June's presence, they're not as upset as Olivia, adding to her feeling of disconnection.

Cat Powers, "Manhattan"

It's September, and Olivia has moved to New York and landed a job at a film production company. She's mostly going on coffee runs and making cheese plates, but living and working in Manhattan—meeting new people and going out with old friends—is exciting and energizing.

Sublime, "Badfish"

Olivia falls into a casual relationship with Michel, an enigmatic older man she meets through work. Spending time with Michel is a balm and a distraction from grief, but it also threatens the precarious sense of stability she's found. It's that classic dilemma: she knows Michel is bad for her, but he's hard to quit.

Arcade Fire, "We Used to Wait"

In December, Olivia visits her family home on Long Island Sound to sort through her mother's things. She isn't sure what to make of the love letters she finds—she can't believe her mother would have had an affair, since her parents had always seemed happily married. The letters will continue to nag at her, ultimately setting her on a path of discovery.

Tori Amos, "Crucify"

Olivia's life in New York falls apart abruptly just after New Year's…and it's mostly her fault. She has to deal with the fallout and come up with a plan B. There may be notes of self pity and anger mixed in with the self-flagellation.

Santigold, "Chasing Shadows"

Olivia returns to India, this time in search of Franco, the man she believes wrote letters to her mother. She's also planning to complete her college thesis, a film portrait of her mother. Though the reasons for the trip are complicated, she can't help but look forward to new adventures, including studying yoga at an ashram her mother had wanted to visit.

Sharon Van Etten, "We Are Fine"

Olivia is blindsided by what she learns in India and struggling to hold it together. She tries to rely on the sense of calm she's learned from her yoga practice to see her through—as well as some of her old, reliable coping strategies.

Death Cab for Cutie, "Transatlanticism"

Olivia returns to New York in time for the one-year anniversary of her mother's death, with a secret she doesn't feel she can share with her family. She's not the only one with conflicted emotions: her brother Ty is having doubts about his upcoming wedding, and her father is questioning his relationship with June.

Hem, "You Can't Always Get What You Want," 2011 (cover)

Nothing is perfect, but Olivia and her family are muddling their way towards peace and acceptance—including, for Olivia, another fresh start.


Joanna Cantor and Alternative Remedies for Loss links:

the author's website

Publishers Weekly review

Literary Hub interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Alex Segura's Playlist for His Novel "Blackout"

Blackout

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Alex Segura's Blackout, the fourth book in his Pete Fernandez series, once again proves him a master of dialogue and suspense.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"With its smart dialogue and vivid settings, this series concentrates equally on the trajectory of Pete Fernandez's life and the mysteries he tries to solve. From both perspectives, it's fine crime fiction."


In his own words, here is Alex Segura's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Blackout:



Blackout, my fourth Pete Fernandez Miami Mystery, is a story of regrets and long-buried secrets bubbling to the surface. I wanted to explore a crime novel about someone not only looking to make amends for their past mistakes, but trying to seize an opportunity to fix a specific failure that’s long haunted them.

The pull of redemption is strong in the novel, and we see it tug recovering alcoholic PI Pete Fernandez from his New York exile back to his hometown of Miami, in the hopes of solving a deadly cold case that’s tormented him since he first botched it years before.

Blackout’s core mystery also revolves around a dormant Miami cult and the aspirations of an ambitious gubernatorial candidate. As both forces careen toward each other, Pete finds himself stuck firmly in the middle. The story allowed me to do a deeper dive into the idea of recovery - and the addict’s quest to not only stop engaging in the behavior that damages them, but also exploring the possibility of moving in a new direction, leaving the wreckage of the past behind.

Music, as always, plays a major part in my writing process. When not typing, I’m brainstorming and plotting out what’s next - often to the beat of an ever-growing playlist of songs. A typical novel playlist can balloon up to about 1,000 tracks. Then, as I progress with the draft, I whittle down - to artists and songs that best reflect key moments in the novel or that resonate with me during the writing. Sometimes, the songs themselves gain entry into the narrative, with a title mentioned here or there in the story. But, more often than not, these playlists just serve as the cinematic soundtrack to the movie playing in my head.

Taylor Swift “Bad Blood”

Swift’s ode to betrayal and lost friendship was one of the first songs I thought about while writing Blackout. We open the novel in 1998, during Pete’s senior year of high school. And while the song was decades away from being released, Swift’s longing vocals and the song’s driving, droning backbeat make it relevant to any high school era - loaded with prickly emotions, overwrought drama and a need to cut deep and twist the knife.

Paul Simon “The Obvious Child”

“Why deny the obvious child?” One of Simon’s strongest solo album tracks, “The Obvious Child” is pure momentum - chugging forward on the back of what sounds like an army of drums, slowing thoughtfully as Simon taps the brakes to sing the plaintive bridge. Evocative and festive at once, the tune manages to evoke memories of pep rallies and the lonelier, more introspective moments of youth.

David Bowie “Right”

Sultry, funky and pulsing with rhythm and knowing bravado, this Bowie Young Americans track is a dance tune in wolf’s clothing, a shimmy step with a sharp coat of menace. Bowie yelps and croons his pleading, the polished soul of the song’s backing vocals and its memorable, sultry guitar groove give the listener a sense of impending - but extremely sexy - doom, which fit perfectly with the feeling I wanted readers to have at the close of Blackout’s first flashback chapters.

St. Vincent “New York” and “Teenage Talk”

Blackout finds Pete in hiding, in exile in New York, away from his friends, family and life, brooding over his past and living his present in neutral. These two St. Vincent songs capture that same sense of nostalgia - a longing for a simpler time, for the embrace of a long, lost lover - the “only motherfucker in the city who will…” fill the space haunting the narrator. Annie Clarke’s cascading vocals on “New York” pair nicely with the song’s somber but at the same time celebratory spirit. I placed “Teenage Talk" at the end of the playlist to serve as a kind of whispered coda to the whole novel, a remembrance of times past, “before we had made any terrible mistakes.”

Gloria Estefan “Get On Your Feet”

Few things are more Miami than Gloria Estefan, with or without her Miami Sound Machine backing band. And this track, unlike the others on the playlist, actually shows up in the book during a pivotal moment. Estefan’s tinny exhortations ride the wave of electronic drums and keyboard effects to create a much greater whole - perhaps her best, most heartfelt anthem. And, as readers will discover, the perfect campaign song for a potential gubernatorial run.

Liz Phair “Divorce Song”

“But if I’d known how that would sound to you / I would have stayed in your bed for the rest of my life.” Pete’s romantic life is loaded with failed relationships, unfortunate encounters, and bad decisions. Most hinge on his own nasty habits - drinking chief among them. Phair’s ode to friends stumbling into bed and the fallout that creates is especially relevant to Blackout, which finds Pete still reeling from a similar experience and unsure which way to go. Raw, honest and boasting a simple but classic rock-tinged arrangement that evokes the Stones as much as Phair’s indie contemporaries, “Divorce Song” ranks as one of the best anthems for bad romantic decisions, further proof that it’s “harder to be friends than lovers.”

Jenny Lewis “She’s Not Me”

In many ways the other side of “Divorce Song”’s relationship ballad coin, Jenny Lewis regretful ode to a failed romance is both honest and enjoyably snippy, taking ownership for her own failings while still snapping rubber bands at her ex’s willingness to settle for someone “easy.” The song plays to Lewis’s strengths - spotlighting her vocals and knack for surrounding herself with players well-steeped in late 60s/early 70s California rock conventions - gelling into a mournful song that still manages to crackle with a bit of optimism for what’s next. Feelings Pete Fernandez - and his partner, Kathy Bentley - are no stranger to.

Bruce Springsteen “Tougher Than the Rest”

I’ve always loved Springsteen’s Tunnel of Love album and feel it gets overlooked, especially when stacked against more beloved works like The River or Born in the USA. Though it features some dated, almost groan-worthy trappings (those drums!), the song, at its heart, epitomizes the best of the Boss - rough-hewn lyrics, workmanlike devotion and fearless honesty. The perfect companion song to a book about a recovering alcoholic trying to solve the murder of his high school crush, decades after the fact.

Fleetwood Mac “Tusk”

The climax of the book, without giving too much away, features a face-off of growing danger and proportions - much of it out of Pete’s control. I love how Buckingham’s manic, unstable vocals - and the witch-like backing vocals of Nicks and McVie - blend with the band’s lush guitar fingerpicking and the rolling backline to create a chaotic, carnival-like atmosphere, a sense of things coming unhinged and danger lurking in every corner. The perfect accompaniment to a man on the run and worried about his own survival.

Elvis Costello “God’s Comic”
Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds “Death is Not the End”
Talking Heads “The Overload”

Blackout is a book about going back and sifting through the destruction caused in the hopes of finding a way forward. But it never guarantees what that path might be. I spent a lot of my time writing the book listening to songs about death and destruction, some darkly comedic, some dour and some just creepy as hell.

Costello’s tongue-in-cheek tune about death finds him at the peak of his powers, even if he’s lacking the oh-so-essential Attractions on this Spike track. Sharp, incisive wordplay (coming close to the line of excess but backpedaling in ways future Costello will not) dances along to the song’s almost child-like rhythms, lulling the listener into thinking they’re hearing about something much happier than The End.

Cave’s take is much more direct and funereal - a slow, plodding and somewhat hopeful ballad that doesn’t mince words, buoyed by a simple piano riff and a pair of memorable guest vocalist turns. The quiet chuckle heard as the wake winds down.

Esoteric, weird, sounding like a lost recording from another planet, “The Overload” closes out what many consider to be the Talking Heads’s best album, Remain in Light. From the ominous opening notes to the song’s droning, de Palma-like closing, the tune oozes finality and despair. Though something might come next, this song definitely signals the end of this chapter, which is what I wanted to signal with Blackout, too - a careening toward blackness, or, well, a blackout.


Alex Segura and Blackout links:

the author's website

Criminal Element review

Comics Beat interview with the author
Entertainment Weekly profile of the author
Hollywood Reporter interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Dangerous Ends
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Down the Darkest Street
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Silent City
Miami Herald profile of the author
Under the Radar interview with the author
Writer's Digest interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Korean Modernist Authors, An Oral History of Johnny Cash's At Folsom Prison Album, and more)

Johnny Cash

Words Without Borders recommended Korean modernist authors.


Rolling Stone shared an oral history of Johnny Cash's At Folsom Prison album.


May's best eBook deals.


Drowned in Sound interviewed singer-songwriter Laura Veirs.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Dan Sheehan.


Stream a new Maltman Fair song.


Electric Literature interviewed author Samantha Irby.


PopMatters listed the best Teenage Fanclub songs.


Catapult features new short fiction by Sharma Shields.


Sigur Ros shared a new mixtape.


The Creative Independent interviewed author Douglas A. Martin.


The Creative Independent interviewed U.S. Girls' Meg Remy.


Author Kim Fu recommended books at the Seattle Review of Books.


Stream a new song by Wand.


Rumaan Alam, Jamel Brinkley, Joanna Cantor, Eliza Kennedy, and Jake Tapper discussed their new books with Literary Hub.


Iceage’s Elias Bender Rønnenfelt and Jakob Tvilling Pless shared the inspirations behind the band's new album Beyondless at Aquarium Drunkard.


Entropy interviewed author Rachel Lyon.


Nap Eyes shared three cover songs at Aquarium Drunkard.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Chuck Palahniuk's new novel Adjustment Day.


Sheila Heti discussed her new novel Motherhood with the Los Angeles Review of Books.


Paul Theroux recommended books to travel with at Literary Hub.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

May 7, 2018

Brendan Kiely's Playlist for His Novel "Tradition"

Tradition

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Brendan Kiely's powerful Tradition is a timely and important young adult novel that addresses rape culture.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"This novel is a timely road map for those looking to find their places in this rapidly changing world… A thoughtfully crafted argument for feminism and allyship."

In his own words, here is Brendan Kiely's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Tradition:



A spirit of rebellion inspired the writing of this novel, especially as I reflected on how men all too often encourage an attitude of misogyny in each other, an attitude that informs the way they behave, the way they joke, the way they talk about women, the way they act with reckless thoughtlessness—all behavior that fuels rape culture. You don’t have to be a perpetrator of violence to be an enabler of it, and in Tradition I wanted to write about two teens struggling to comprehend and expose just how deep and pervasive this culture of violence towards women runs. Jules and Bax, one girl and one boy who are in their final year of boarding school, take it upon themselves to shake up the culture of silence around them and wake up the people who have too often protected harassers and abusers.

I wanted to rebel against how I was taught to be a man, I wanted to rebel against the kinds of institutions that protect the people who work for them rather than the safety and justice of the people those institutions are supposed to support, bolster, and empower. I wanted to rebel by looking to the leadership of those, especially women, who have been fighting this fight for so long. Not all rebellion is loud and spectacular, some of it is, and some of it needs to be, but there are so many other moments of rebellion that, although they often go unnoticed, make great changes in the world around them. As Toni Cade Bambara said, “the role of the artist is to make revolution irresistible,” and in my novel, by writing about quiet rebellions and well as loud ones, I hoped to catch a little of the spirit of Bambara’s line.

When I sat down to write Tradition, I thought about the women who organized and invited me to join Take Back the Night marches in college. I thought about the bravery and tenacity of Emma Sulkowicz as she dragged her mattress to graduation at Columbia University to remind the whole world that no amount of institutional cover up could silence her. The boarding school culture Jules and Bax grapple with in Tradition mirrors our broader society—it’s riddled with insidious and deeply entrenched misogyny—and I wanted to write about people who challenge that status quo. I wanted to write about the strength of women who stand up and speak out about misogyny, and also, especially as a man writing this book, I wanted to write a novel that asked, “How can men be better feminists?” What are men’s roles in this time of necessary cultural reckoning?

The songs on this list fed that spirit of rebellion and self-examination as I wrote.


Thao & The Get Down Stay Down – Holy Roller
I have to start here because the boyant, plucky spirit of this song and its insistent refrain “I want love in the aftermath” fits the mood at the start of the novel and, more importantly, is the message I wanted to keep in the front of my mind as I worked on a story that grapples with assault and abuse—that survivors get to dictate their own futures.

Lisa Hannigan – Home
For a novel that takes place at a boarding school, a song about “home” and how far away it is (or can feel, even when you’re in it) was one I kept returning to, over and again, a song full of lies, broken promises, and hope heavy with melancholy—exactly the kind of atmosphere I wanted to create at Fullbrook Academy. Hannigan’s voice floats and soars and drifts back down, all in the same long breath, and there’s something of that lilting wail I hear in Jules’s heart in this book.

The Pixies – Where Is My Mind
This song has intoxicated me since I first heard it when I was in middle school. But no matter what age I am, it still seems to perfectly fit that same feeling of having the ground yanked out from underneath you—a feeling that is growing for both Bax and Jules in their final year of high school. While Black Francis/Frank Black’s voice whines in a way that feels urgent and necessary, the haunting background vocals do something to create the strange effect of isolating the lead vocals—and again, it’s that feeling of isolation that both Jules and Bax are grappling with in the novel.

Ibeyi – Away Away
Though the music is very different at the party Jules, Bax, Javi, and Aileen check out at the college party (I imagined something more like an electronica Scissor Sisters type band) the escape from Fullbrook, even for one night feels liberating, uplifting, affirming, and is fueled by doggedly determined instinct to survive, no matter what claustrophobic pressure they feel at Fullbrook. This song captures that spirit, and in fact, all of Ibeyi’s music rises and rises and rises with resilience and joy.

Hozier – Take Me to Church
Even before I saw the video for this song, the first time I heard it, I heard tragedy—violence at the hands of the mob. For me, this song and the atmosphere it suggests, swoops through the entire section of the book that is the party at Horn Rock. “I’ll tell you my sins so you can sharpen your knife.”

Valerie June – Pushin' Against a Stone
This song announces itself in the most haunting way. It’s static-filled, electric guitar rips to life in the way I see the bonfire crackling at the party at Horn Rock, and June’s voice, so clear and determined following it seems to gain it’s strength from sounding so earnest (at least to my ears) and that is the same place from which I think the friendships (the only true ones in the book) emerge from: a space in which two scared and nervous people have the strength to be vulnerable and earnest with each other.

Be Good Tanyas – Human Thing
I absolutely love the Be Good Tanyas and every time I listen to them I pause, catch my breath and remember to take pleasure, reverence even, in small, quiet and often overlooked things. It’s like that in a friendship too, when a friend can anticipate your needs, when a friend remains quiet for as long as you need to formulate the words for whatever is going on inside. This song rattled through my mind as I was trying to find ways for a few of the characters to reconcile their differences with each other, to find some bit of peace with each other after the storm of Horn Rock.

Milky Chance – Stolen Dance
As is usually the case when I’m writing, I end up liking characters who are not main characters and for me, while working on Javi’s arc in the book, this song kept cycling and cycling—especially as I worked toward the end of the book. He’d been denied too much happiness and denied it too regularly, without people (even some of the people closest to him) acknowledging it, so, in a sense, this song feels like something Javi wants to sing himself near the end of the book.

Bjork – Army of Me
I remember a party I went to my first year of college and this song was playing. I already knew the song, had seen the video; I already bumped it in my own car’s speakers—but at this party, it was the first time I saw a room full of women stomping, dancing, shouting along with the lyrics, and there was something awesome (in the real sense of the word) about their collective, unfettered energy. It is this same kind of I’ve fucking had it with you guys attitude that Jules’s has as the school year hurtles toward the winter ball and Jules decides to take matters into her own hands.

The Arcade Fire – Wake Up
This power anthem speaks to me about the necessity of reflecting on who we are and what we’ve been taught, especially as a man writing about toxic masculinity, the line, “someone told me not to cry/ but now that I’m older I see that it’s a lie,” lands right where I want Bax to land as he’s reflecting on his life being cultured to be a violent machine on the football field and in the ice hockey rink. It’s this toxic masculinity that’s at the heart of all the problems at Fullbrook and when all else seems to fail and Jules asks Bax for his help doing something big, loud, and unforgettable the night of the winter ball, their rebellious and irreversible act that night seems filled with the energy of this song.

Michael Kiwanuka – Love and Hate
I can’t get enough of Kiwanka’s voice, and though I was introduced to his music by watching Big Little Lies last year, I was editing Tradition and this song in particular captured the kind of emotional crossroads I was trying to hit in the final third of the novel, where there is love and hope, but the melancholy brought on by the seemingly impossible odds of being an outsider who wants to speak up in a powerful place that reinforces and rewards silence. The hard tug on the heart here is exactly where I hope people land as the read the end of the novel too.


Brendan Kiely and Tradition links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Chicago Tribune review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review
School Library Journal review

Electric Literature interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist for The Last True Love Story


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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