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July 19, 2014

Daily Downloads (Josh Ritter, Kaki King, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Drive-By Truckers: 2011-10-28, St. Louis [mp3,ogg,flac]
Drive-By Truckers: "Uncle Frank" [mp3]

Hayes Carll: 2014-07-12, Winston-Salem [mp3,ogg,flac]
Hayes Carll: "Bad Liver and a Heart" [mp3]

Josh Ritter: [mp3,ogg.flac]
Josh Ritter: "Girl in the War" [mp3]

Kaki King: 2014-04-29, Washington [mp3,ogg,flac]
Kaki King: "Fortuna" [mp3]

Mother Hips: 2014-07-05, Quincy [mp3,ogg,flac]
Mother Hips: "Gold Plated" [mp3]

Robyn Hitchcock: 2014-05-23, Sydney [mp3.ogg.flac]
Robyn Hitchcock: "Nothing Was Delivered (Bob Dylan cover)" [mp3]

Sharon Van Etten: 2010-10-09, New York [mp3,ogg,flac]
Sharon Van Etten: "Holding On" [mp3]

Trampled By Turtles: 2014-07-06, Quincy [mp3,ogg,flac]
Trampled By Turtles: "Where Is My Mind (Pixies cover)" [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Melvins: 2004-09-02, Athens [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us





July 18, 2014

Book Notes - Michael J. Seidlinger "The Fun We've Had"

The Fun We've Had

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Michael J Seidlinger's novel The Fun We've Had brilliantly melds joy and poignancy in a work as imaginative as it is engaging and thought provoking.

Amber Sparks wrote of the book:

"Michael J Seidlinger writes with the kind of weird, wonderful, joyful abandon that reminds the reader that world is still the great unknown. In The Fun We've Had, he examines the long blank space between life and death, fills it with love and loss and boats made of coffins, with people clinging to life and using the weight of the past as ballast. This is a fun read, true; but it's also a true read, and that's what makes it so beautifully sad."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Michael J. Seidlinger's Book Notes music playlist for his novel, The Fun We've Had:


The theoretical soundtrack populating the empty spaces of the novel, The Fun We've Had, that's what I'm going to attempt to do here. These are the noises, the sounds, the ambience, the epic crescendos, as well as the depressing and anticlimactic lows that will inevitably occur across the endless purgatorial sea in the book. It both accentuates and masks the voice of the titular sea.

What I'm saying is: Here's a bunch of post-rock. I hope you all like post rock.

Godspeed You Black Emperor – "Storm"

This track alone could be the entirely of the book notes feature given its breadth of scale but yeah I intend on offering more than one of the most popular Godspeed tracks. But at the same time, I can imagine the entirety of the events that took place within the pages of the book completely mapping to this track. I could do without the noise at the end and I'd need more lows, more ambience to the booming post-rock highs that this track most definitely excels at… but then again, I've got other chances to fill in what's missing. Big ups to Godspeed, though. Man, this track.

On to the sections of the book…

DENIAL

This Will Destroy You – "Black Dunes"

It starts out, like any argument, with a denial of what is about to come to pass. This song in particular consistently holds back, opting to establish mood over doing anything in the way of building the typical track via verses, bridges, interludes, and what have you. It helps that the track itself captures the sense of hopelessness and inner pining that starts off the novel. Both him and her, the two main characters, are out at sea and for however many attempts he might have to try to steer them to a definitive direction, they end up where they began.

Russian Circles – "Xavii"

With this one, it feels more hopeful, but it's the same brand of denial—built on the unwillingness of two souls unwilling to work together. I give this one to her, a more hopeful and confident track. Listening to this, it almost feels definitive, like this will all be okay, but it won't. And it never will. It's misleading. She likes to mislead herself into thinking that none of this matters.

ANGER

Frondibus – "Chimeras Were Born"

This track fits in if only because it feels so much like the rise of some new feeling. In this case, it's anger, and it's him, fighting to get back what he feels has been lost against the endless sea that will always and forever be the setting of this book. This song defines an uprising; it defines the first strike in an angered and embittered attack against where both him and her have found themselves.

Man Mountain – "Man of Science, Man of Faith"

But for all the anticipation and aggression, reality sets in and it cuts both characters right down to the coffin: You are here and there's a certain impossibility that has everything to do with what they are unwilling to admit. This song captures that inner quarrel that both characters inevitably face. Plus, it's one of the lesser known post-rock outfits and, man, I love this song.

BARGAINING

Jesu – "Heartache"

But for all that anger and aggression, you end up on your knees, like both characters, facing the absurdity of their setting. Jesu has written some of the most intense instrumental music around and this one, which was actually the fist track I listened to by them, remains one of my favorites. There's something about the way it plods along, taking its time, like some kind of assailant so confident with its kill that it walks slowly, enjoying the moment before the actual kill. Jesu. Yup.

Audrey Fall – "Petrina"

But it can't all be bad. There needs to be some sense of promise, some sense of hope. This track, among so many others—I will state here that it took me a long time to figure out what would follow up Jesu—is perfect as a sort of pick-me-up, hopeful enough to assume that after so much, there can still be more. Keep going, even if there is no end in sight… given that fear is next. There won't be. Somehow, the characters continue, and we keep listening.

FEAR

Moonlit Sailor – "The Golden Years"

Oh man, this was one of those random encounters, a band that I might never have known about. So glad that I've discovered their work and now own their albums. But yeah, here, at the start of the fear section of the novel, I figure it's best to give him and her the benefit of the doubt with a track that sounds more uplifting and promising than the expected dejected shit that a “fear” section would have led on. It's a great track and I am able to map it to a specific scene in this section, though I won't tell because that would only spoil things.

Capricorns – "1946: The Last Renaissance Man"

Don't know anything about this band except for the fact that they have this one album that is amazing. As a whole, it hits all the perfect highs and lows. This track in particular fits with the strung-out situation that both him and her find themselves towards the end of the section. They need a pick-me-up; they need something to feed off of, and it might as well be this track.

ACCEPTANCE

If These Trees Could Talk – "The Aleutian Clouds"

This is where it begins to fade. Acceptance. This is where everything you'd rather forget, the guilt, the summary of your failures, what makes you human, it all echoes out right before you are left with who you are… but hey, this band is incredible. One of the lesser-known post-rock outfits. Most of their tracks are equally as good.

Sleepmakeswaves - "…And So We Destroyed Everything"


This track encapsulates the final section of the book, Acceptance, as well as everything else. It works as well as Godspeed You Black Emperor's "Storm," but maybe a little better because it fits so well as a closer. The way I view the theoretical soundtrack, it's not about giving tracks to certain scenes but rather providing a landscape for those about to dive into the novel. If you agree, then you'll appreciate this track. It's the proverbial life-flashing-before-your-eyes moment, the final exhale, the moment before letting go. Life fading. I hope that you enjoy this track. I'd let go to something as well tempered/written as this. If sleep makes waves, please, let me fall asleep.


Michael J. Seidlinger and The Fun We've Had links:

excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Fanzine review
HTMLGIANT review

Flavorwire profile of the author
Monkeybicycle interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Christopher J. Yates "Black Chalk"

Black Chalk

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Christopher J. Yates's debut novel Black Chalk is a marvelously complex thriller.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Psychological thrillers don’t get much more complex or twisted than Yates's promising debut."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Christopher J. Yates's Book Notes music playlist for his novel, Black Chalk:


Black Chalk is set at Oxford University, early Nineties, and in the East Village, New York, 2005. The early Oxford sections follow my fictional students as they smoke, drink and listen to a lot of music, so many of my choices reflect this experience (one that I went through myself). Meanwhile, the New York sections follow a damaged hermit who listens to little more than the crazy voices in his head, but I enjoyed working out a few musical tracks that suitably reflect his odd, cracked life.

Theme track: 'We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful' (Morrissey)

Honestly, I could have included twenty or thirty Morrissey/Smiths tracks that describe the sly-but-shy feelings of eighteen-year-old students. I also could have chosen Gloria Gaynor's 'I Will Survive' as the theme track (the tagline for Black Chalk is 'One Game. Six Students. Five Survivors'). But I've decided to go with an early Nineties tune that feels appropriate for the game of psychological dares that my six students play, a game that's riven through with destructive competitiveness and jealousy.

'Everything In Its Right Place' (Radiohead)

The New York sections of Black Chalk are seemingly narrated by a hermit living a life full of strange rituals. His memory has been damaged by his past and his life is guided by a system of 'physical mnemonics'. For example, to help him avoid dehydration, he places six empty water glasses in the middle of his living room floor. When he stumbles across these, his memory is jogged and he drinks some water. Gradually we discover just how many mnemonics he has strewn around his apartment—everything in its right place.

'I Wanna Be Adored' (The Stone Roses)

Early on in Black Chalk, my six students listen to this track as they sit around chewing the fat. Could anything else better sum up the feelings of these awkward but ambitious eighteen-year-olds?

'Eye of the Tiger' (Survivor)

My hermit faces with a challenge. Fourteen years after playing the game of psychological dares he receives a phone call. The game was never concluded. Now, in a few weeks time, the two remaining players must face off. The hermit lives a broken life but knows he has to get mentally stronger and wonders if his recovery could work along the lines of recovering fighters in boxing movies. He evens hums “boxing movie” music, so what could be better than a song written for the Rocky movies?

'Territorial Pissings' (Nirvana)

No novel set in early Nineties student bedrooms would be complete without a little Nirvana. The title is apt, as my students try to stake out their positions within the group. And the line: 'Just because you're paranoid, don't mean they're not after you' couldn't be more appropriate, once the reader finds out there might be something much bigger behind the game being played.

'Can't Stand Me Now' (The Libertines)

A song about two men whose friendship, having been torn apart, descends into loathing. May or may not apply directly, precisely and one hundred percent to my novel.

'Ding Dong! The Witch Is Dead' (The Munchkins)

Halfway through my own first term at Oxford, Margaret Thatcher resigned as British Prime Minister. Black Chalk is set in the same period and, after Thatcher leaves Downing Street, my fictional students throw a party and play this song over and over again. I wrote this scene 18 months before Margaret Thatcher died. And after her death, controversially, this song rocketed to the top spot on the UK singles chart.

'Love Will Tear Us Apart' (Joy Division)

OK, this track could apply to maybe half the works of literature in the known universe. In Black Chalk, the love that tears my students apart is a love that is not only romantic/sexual but also based on friendship and their similar upbringings. Unfortunately, it is also the sort of love that led Gore Vidal to say “Every time a friend succeeds, I die a little.” And because 'Love Will Tear Us Apart' was perhaps the most played track in UK student bedrooms of the early Nineties, I'm claiming it.

'Monk's Mood' (Thelonious Monk)

Black Chalk's hermit lives an odd monastic life, describing his time alone before the novel begins as “three cloistral years”. This track by my favorite jazz artist is spiky, from Thelonious Monk's piano-playing style, but also noirish, all smoky horns and dark streets. A perfect track to accompany my whisky-swilling hermit through his strange, unraveling days as he waits to learn his uncertain fate.


Christopher J. Yates and Black Chalk links:

the author's website

Daily Mail review
Publishers Weekly review

Daily Mayo interview with the author
Publishers Weekly review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Atomic Books Comics Preview - July 18, 2014

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics and graphic novels.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. The Mobtown Shank is his blog, and his comic Said What? is syndicated weekly in the Baltimore Sun's B-Paper.

Atomic Books has been named one of Bizarre Magazine's 51 geekiest places on the planet, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Adventure Time #30

Adventure Time #30
by various

This issue of Adventure Time is a standalone. It's constructed like a zine that Marceline is making with the help of her friends, so various Adventure Time characters contribute comics stories (actually done by Liz Prince, Yumi Sakugawa and many more). It's one of the more adorable Adventure Time comics I've read in a while.


Daygloayhole #2

Daygloayhole #2
by Ben Passmore

Daygloayhole is a psychedelic post-apocalyptic adventure comic - sort of like if Paul Pope had created Adventure Time with the help of Mike Allred and Brian Ralph. This issue offers theoretical roaches, tv-faced monsters, a city of traps, a giant, floating-disembodied hand, and references to Ghost Dog, Bolano and Kafka.


God And The Devil At War In The Garden (Monologuist Paper Update IV)

God And The Devil At War In The Garden (Monologuist Paper Update IV)
by Anders Nilsen

Nilsen's God And The Devil At War In The Garden is a tremendous accomplishment. Nilsen is the rare cartoonist who has exceptional thoughts and ideas that are as complex as his illustrations. I could stare at his "Anatomy of a Vacant Lot" for days - and in a way, I kind of have since there is a lot just like it where I live. But the included Conversation Gardening, where he discusses his feelings about Amazon, should be required reading. And oh yeah, Nilsen is also doing this thing where if you buy any of his books from an independent bookseller and send him a note and the receipt, he'll send you back a drawing. Genius!


Henry And Glenn Forever And Ever

Henry And Glenn Forever And Ever
by Tom Neely / various

And here it is - the Henry & Glenn masterwork - collecting the four issue mini-series plus 100 pages of additional comics chronicling the adventures of Henry Rollins and Glenn Danzig. The introduction by Rob Halford is a nice touch. And the color section of covers, cover-variants and other artworks makes this book even more irresistible.


Ritual #3: Vile Decay

Ritual #3: Vile Decay
by Malachi Ward

It's a perspective-twisting tale of how civilization's past decay prefaces its future decay - and a computer program - beautifully told by Ward.


Seconds: A Graphic Novel

Seconds: A Graphic Novel
by Bryan Lee O'Malley

If you've been Jonesing for more O'Malley since Scott Pilgrim, O'Malley has finally delivered the goods in hardcover, full-color glory. Magic mushrooms give Kate, the struggling restaurateur, a do over. But the temptation to not just make her life better but perfect proves too much.


TITLE

TITLE
by Eric Gordon / Sara Gordon / various

The perfect zine for the Robocop fanatic - complete with fan comics, character obituaries, pin-ups and a police blotter - all based around the 1987 classic.


Vinyl Vagabonds #5

Vinyl Vagabonds #5
by Eric Gordon / Sara Gordon

The new issue of the excellent record-collectors' fanzine ups the ante with a screenprinted cover. Loaded with record reviews, a piece on colored vinyl and a review of the records of 2013 - if you prefer your music to come on vinyl, you need Vinyl Vagabonds.


Youth Is Wasted

Youth Is Wasted
by Noah Van Sciver

Noah is consistently proving himself to be the most important cartoonist of his generation. Youth Is Wasted is a rather ironic title for this collection of stories, as it shows Van Sciver, now looking at 30, has done anything but waste his youth.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Said What?


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2013" Book Lists

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Indie Songs Inspired by Books, Essential Icelandic Albums, and more)

USA Today listed indie songs inspired by books.


World Cafe listed essential Icelandic albums.


Tor.com interviewed author Tiphanie Yanique.


PopMatters interviewed Nick Sanborn of Sylvan Esso.


Recently wed authors Juliet Escoria and Scott McClanahan are keeping a honeymoon diary at HTMLGIANT.


The Telegraph listed the best internet radio stations.


Bookworm interviewed author Francine Prose.


FACT is counting down the best albums of the 1970s.


Flavorwire recommended fabulist books.


The A.V. Club recommended entry points into Japanese idol pop music.


PopMatters shared an excerpt from Nelson George's book The Hippest Trip in America: Soul Train and the Evolution of Culture & Style.


Jonathan Demme and David Byrne talked to TIME about the Talking Heads film Stop Making Sense, released 30 years ago.


tUnE-yArDs visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Actor and comedian Bill Hader talked books with the New York Times.


Pitchfork is streaming the new PS I Love You album, For Those Who Stay.


Flavorwire shared a nonfiction book for every U.S. State.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Daily Downloads (The Rosebuds, Field Report, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Christopher Denny: "Our Kind of Love" [mp3] from If The Roses Don't Kill Us (out August 5th)

Field Report: "Wings" [mp3] from Marigolden (out October 7th)

Hearts of Oak: "Tunnels" [mp3] from New England

Hook and Anchor: "Concerning Spectral Pinching" [mp3] from Hook and Anchor (out July 22nd)

Joe Marson: "Here With Me" [mp3] from Electric Soul Magic

Michaela Anne: Live on WFMU with Irene - July 14, 2014 [mp3]

Ritual Howls: "Zemmoa" [mp3] from Turkish Leather (out September 30th)

The Rosebuds: "Blue Eyes" [mp3] from Sand + Silence

Terese Taylor: "Poor Man" [mp3] from At Your Mercy Circuit


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Paul Collins Beat: 2014-06-27, Athens [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

July 17, 2014

Book Notes - Mike Edison "The Carnivore's Manifesto"

More Curious

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

The Carnivore's Manifesto is a collection of essays that lives up to its title. These pieces make the case for ethical consumption of meat with clarity, wit, and a true sense of purpose.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"A lively and challenging collection of observations, ideas, philosophical meanderings, and ethical concerns related to the meat we put on our plates."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Mike Edison's Book Notes music playlist for his book, The Carnivore's Manifesto:


There is a stockyard's worth of music in our new book, The Carnivore's Manifesto. In the course of advocating a sustainable, cruelty-free food chain, eating for pleasure, and supporting family farms, Patrick Martins and I dally with Cole Porter ("Making' Whoopee," in the chapter about eating food in season, and the natural sex lives of livestock), Bob Dylan ("to live outside the law you must be honest" — speaking of our code of conduct when it comes to food activism), not to mention truck driving classics like "Convoy" and "Six Days on the Road," in a chapter in which we herald truck drivers as America's largely unsung heroes.

But for this playlist I thought I would go 100-percent Grade A beef (well, more or less) and whip out a playlist of meat songs. Because that's what's for dinner.

"It Ain't the Meat It's the Motion," The Swallows

Classic dirty R&B from 1951, although in the Carnivore's Manifesto we argue exactly the opposite – it IS the meat, meaning quit trying to confound me with recipes and tricks and maybe try scoring your steak from a happy cow who lived a drug-free, cruelty free life for a change, because that's where it's at. But otherwise, yeah. What the man said.

"Caught with the Meat in Your Mouth," The Dead Boys

One of the messages of The Carnivore's Manifesto is that our relationship with food is an intimate one. After all, you put it in your mouth, so you should know where it comes from. This song, of course, has nothing to do with food activism or good eating….

"Meat Man," Jerry Lee Lewis

My personal favorite of the bunch. As ever, The Killer transcends whatever the song seems to be about and goes straight for the final frontier. Here at the Carnivore's Manifesto we stand hard against the Industrial Farming Complex, but Jerry Lee takes it to the next level. Feathers in his teeth, indeed.

"Easy Meat," Frank Zappa

Let me just say it right here that I don't really dig Frank Zappa. After a pretty cool start with Freak Out and a few garishly smart and occasionally funny outings, he turned to the plastic fantastic goop of prog rock and the kind of sexist, smutty novelty tunes that pander shamelessly to awkward, twenty-year old male virgins and would have seen him pilloried if any women actually listened to this crap. This clip pretty much sums up the worst of both crimes — witness the 400-piece drum set and the puerile lyrics: "This girl is easy meat/I seen her on the street…..I knew she was/Easy Meat." This is the kind of stuff idiots listen to when they want to feel superior. But I felt that this had to be included so I could (A) make my case against Zappa and (B) make a segue to Frank's old running mate, a true hero…

"Neon Meate Dream of an Octafish," Capt. Beefheart and the Magic Band

I confess to having no earthly clue to what the fuck this song is about, or even if "meate" and "meat" are the same thing, but the dude's name is "Beefheart" and I'll take any chance to spread the gospel of his mighty vision and pimp the greatest avant garde statement in the history or recorded music, Trout Mask Replica, from which this jewel was purloined.

"One Man's Meat," Gary Lucas & Gods and Monsters

Speaking of Capt. Beefheart, guitar ace Gary Lucas was his manager and plucked and slid on the six-string in the last go-round of the Magic Band. This is one of his signature numbers with his New Yawk Supah Group, here heard with special guest David Johansen. Full discloser: I sometimes sit in with Gary and the fellas, jamming theremin on local gigs. Nice work if you can get it.

"One Man's Meat," The Lurkers

Maybe not so surprising is that there is more than one song called "Actor Viggo Mortensen made a record called One Man's Meat (with his ex-wfe Exene, from X,) and features the title track plus "Barbecue Kingdom," and "Carne de Niño," so he is all over the meat thing. Deep Purples's stab at something called "One Man's Meat," meanwhile, (from their 1993 comeback turd TKTKTK) is among the worst music ever recorded in the history of the spot. The best of rest is this minor miracle, from the too-often overlooked British punks the Lurkers, presented here, raw and ready, just the way I like it.

"War of the Superbikes," The Meatmen

As an Epilogue, there are a small gaggle of bands who have the word "meat" in their handles that I could have just as easily tossed on the grill, but, after much thought, have decided to take a pass on Meat Loaf's schlocky karaoke classics and the earnest twang and strum of the Meat Puppets to go with one of my favorite second-wave punk rock acts, the Meatmen. This one is from their later macho metal phase, but if it's too much testosterone for you to handle ("three men on monster machines shot out of God's slingshot"), then as a bonus here's the title track from their first outing, the decidedly juvenile We're the Meatmen and You Suck.


Mike Edison and The Carnivore's Manifesto links:

the author's Wikipedia entry
the book's website

Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review

Food52 interview with Patrick Martins
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by Mike Edison for I Have Fun Everywhere I Go
Wall Street Journal profile of Patrick Martins


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - July 17, 2014

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Seconds

Seconds
by Bryan Lee O'Malley

The hotly anticipated follow up to O'Malley's emblematic Scott Pilgrim series was worth the wait! 29 year old restaurant owner, Katie, discovers that she can undo her mistakes by writing them down in a mysterious book and eating a mushroom before bed, but it soon becomes clear that this power has some unintended consequences. If you're in Montreal on July 31, be sure to catch O'Malley here at Librairie D&Q where he will be in conversation with Brad Mackay, followed by a signing. Tickets are free with a purchase of Seconds!


God and the Devil at War in the Garden

God and the Devil at War in the Garden
by Anders Nilsen

Nilsen's idea to both shed light on and subvert Amazon's business practices is as ingenious as it is beautiful. Included with the book is an invitation to the reader: if you send Nilsen your receipt (a formality to prove that you bought it from an independent bookstore, rather than Amazon) and a request or question, he will send you a personalized drawing in response! As if that wasn't incentive enough to pick up a copy, it is absolutely gorgeous to look at too.


Spectacular Optical Book One: KID POWER!

Spectacular Optical Book One: KID POWER!
by Kier-La Janisse

The latest from Kier-La Janisse, author of the perennial store favourite, House of Psychotic Women, promises to be a true delight for anyone who appreciates the weirder side of kids' cinema and television. This book is the debut in a line of small-run, themed anthologies focused on cult film, pop culture, and emphasizing the work of Canadian genre writers. Sounds almost too good to be true, no?


Who Did It?  Who Did It?

Who Did It? Who Did It?
by Ohara Hale

If there's one thing that makes kids laugh without fail -and plenty of grown-ups too- it's bodily functions. This little boxed set covers all the bases and is chock full of hilarious illustrations of animals relieving themselves, all the while teaching kids the proper etiquette for such situations. Ohara Hale will be here at Librairie D&Q on Sunday July 27th at 10:00 am, reading from her books, and teaching kids how to draw farting dogs (amongst other things, of course.) It'll be a whale of a time, so bring your wee ones for some laughs, snacks and fun drawings!


The Hundred-Year House

The Hundred-Year House
by Rebecca Makkai

Unfolding in a secret-laden, possibly haunted Midwestern estate, Makkai's latest novel pays homage to the grand tradition of gothic fiction. Laurelfield, the titular hundred year old house, was once an arts colony, and still harbors the creative spirits of many of its former inhabitants. Academics Zee and Doug move in with their somewhat eccentric family and begin to unravel some of Laurelfield's history in this engrossing tale of horror, love, and family drama.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (The Appeal of Human-Curated Playlists, The Best Novels of 2014 So Far, and more)

The Next Web examined the appeal of human-curated music playlists.


Paste listed the best novels of 2014 so far.


Comic Book Resources listed six of the best books of 2014 so far.


Noisey offered tips on starting a metal band.


Author Javier Marias discussed reasons not to write novels at the Independent.


The Fresh & Onlys visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Flavorwire shared a reading list of books that address the Israeli-Palestine conflict.


The Guardian recommended essential tracks from alternative bands you've never heard of.


Publishers Weekly listed great graphic novel adaptations of literature.


The Quietus reconsidered Echo and the Bunnymen's 1984 album Ocean Rain.


Stephen Burt discusses trans literature at the New Yorker.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

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Daily Downloads (Woods, Low Roar, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Ben Wht: "Summer Bird" [mp3]

Dakota Parler: Thoroughfare album [mp3]

Filmloom: Limit EP [mp3]

Low Roar: Havallagata 30 EP [mp3]

Powderhouse: In the Meantime album [mp3]
Powderhouse: The Powderhouse Sampler EP [mp3]

Twin Cities: In the Past Four Months EP [mp3]

Various Artists: Roadrunner Records 2014 Summer Sampler album [mp3]

Wilbur by the Sea: Wilbur By the Sea EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Woodsist: 2014-04-22, Brooklyn [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

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July 16, 2014

Book Notes - Scott Cheshire "High as the Horses' Bridles"

High as the Horses' Bridles

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Scott Cheshire's High as the Horses' Bridles is one of the year's strongest debuts. This epic novel brilliantly explores themes of family, faith, and desire.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Cheshire tackles life's biggest issues through the person of Josiah, whose evangelistic heritage is finally revealed, in a narrative studded with gems of insight about the human condition. An impressively crafted literary first novel."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Scott Cheshire's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel, High as the Horses' Bridles:


A Soundtrack for Apocalypse

There will come a falling rain of fire. Smell the crackling oven air and tall burning trees, as the earth splits open like a mouth. A river of blood fills the streets. God is pissed. Or maybe there will come a firestorm of flesh-melting mass annihilation, a nuclear mushroom cloud. City blocks and buildings turned to dust. Or maybe the water levels rise, and we drown. Regardless, we all die. Or most of us do anyway, when it comes to apocalypse. And you can bet it will already be an uber-dramatic scene, so a soundtrack might seem like overkill. Nevertheless…

When I was a boy, in 1980's Cold War America, the End of the World was alive and well, on everybody's minds, on TV, in books, certainly at church, and at home (also sort of church). The Apocalypse was coming any day now. And I'm still a sucker for that kind of thing. I saw the Armageddon cheese-fest that is The Day After Tomorrow on opening day, and sat way up front so that great tidal wall of water would seem even more monstrous. But as I got older, I became less and less interested in that particular take on the word, in the gaudy, bloody, puerile sense of apocalypse (which is actually something of a neologism, a modern interpretation), and became more interested in the literal, classic sense of the word. Apocálypsis, from ancient Greek, means an "un-covering," "a lifting of the veil," "a revelation" (hence the biblical book). And in this sense, I must admit, I continue to be one apocalyptic mother*ucker. Really, all writers are. Otherwise what are we writing for? If not for some uncovering? If not to find out something previously unknown about ourselves? If not to break through the veil of "reality" and access some new place of meaning? If not to leave the body and transcend?

In that spirit, I give you ten pieces of music especially apocalyptic, in every sense of the word. Which means there is but one place to start: Slayer.

10 – "War Ensemble," Slayer, Season in the Abyss

This list would be incomplete without metal, and "War Ensemble" is a rallying bloodcurdling battle cry. When Tom Araya rages, like a warlord possessed, and screams from the hills – "Waaaaaaaaar!" – it sounds like the last thing you'll ever hear while running for your life. This is the sound, not of war, but the desire for war, for the End, the sound of bloodlust. It's thrilling, frightening, and relentless.

9 – "The End of all Things," NoMeansNo, Wrong

NoMeansNo are the evil clowns of punk rock. Equal parts punk, jazz, prog, and metal, they have been called "Motörhead after art school," and Wrong is their masterpiece. "The End of all Things" is about as twisted and seductive as they get, with a collection of gleefully demonic and lovely lady voices singing along with the band as they all hymn heavenward, over and over and over: "Hear the angles sing/ This is the end of all things!" The whole show is closing down, and they are just plain giddy.

8 – "World of Dogs," Death Grips, No Love Web Deep

Death Grips are the future. The music is lusty, menacing, and manic, and "World of Dogs" manages to make a stuttering chorus of "It's all suicide, suicide, it's all suicide" actually sound sexy. It's a song for a post-apocalyptic world without humanity, all animal, and it works because we soon come to recognize that world as this one. "Left for dead, but I'm not dead yet"—Death Grips barks. The dogs are coming, but I will not go gently.

7 – "My Sweet Lord," George Harrison

This song scared the shit out of me when I was a kid. Yes, it's sweet, bracingly sincere, and sounds like a lullaby sung by the Buddha. But in the 1980's there existed a palpable fear of "cults," especially in my house where family and friends found it necessary to daily deny accusations that we were in one. And so when I heard Harrison and the halo of voices around him chanting—

"Hare Krishna

Hare Krishna

Krishna Krishna

Hare Hare Hare Rama

Hare Rama

Aah

Hallelujah."

--and when I heard, “I want to go to you, I really want to go with you, my lord,” all I heard was a longing for rapturous death.

6 – "Massage the History." Sonic Youth

This is where things get really interesting, for me anyway, because apocalypse is essentially abut the manipulation of time, our perception of it, and mastering death. Kim Gordon (I had posters of her on my wall in high school) sounds here like she's in mourning: "Wishing you were here by me/ Wishing you were here/ Let's massage the history." It eventually devolves into one of their wonderfully nosiey abstract guitar spirals, like its about to fall apart and die. But it doesn't. The melody returns, and so does Gordon: "Here's a song, here's a song/ To massage history along/ Come with me to the other side/ Not everyone makes it out alive." It's their last song, on their last album, recorded in the throes of a dying marriage, and it's gutting and perfect.

5 – "Countdown to Armageddon," Public Enemy

In just one minute and forty seconds, Public Enemy makes the most pithy and powerful musical statement on apocalypse. The opening track of their second album, amidst the roar of a screaming crowd, "Countdown…" starts with the blare of an air raid siren, followed by one loud voice: "Peace! Armageddon has been in effect! Go get a late pass." Peace? Armageddon? At the same time? Oh yes, because like it or not, death is life, life is death, and war and peace are happening now and everywhere, always have been. It's a wake up call, an alarm to popular consciousness: go get a late pass. Every moment is eschatological.

4 – Ascension, John Coltrane

This is the stuff. And it's fitting it follows Public Enemy because there would be no P.E. without Coltrane's aching bellow and skronk. Coltrane makes me cry. Coltrane makes me feel alive. But more than anything else he takes me elsewhere, off this plane. And Ascension is all about elsewhere. A seven-man front line of horns, they were given few cues save theme and chords, but most important, a directive: go headlong and ascend toward crescendo. For some it's meaningless noise. For others, like me, it's the sound of eleven men reaching out for Jacob's Ladder. It's a try at heaven, or maybe better, at the heavens, to break through the earthy veil into cosmos.

3 – "The Moon is your Moon," Edible Flowers

I have listened to this album thousands of time. Literally. I listen to it every time I write. It's in my blood, by now, not to mention the acknowledgements of the novel. I first saw Nels Cline and Devin Sarno perform as Edible Flowers over a decade ago, and it remains one of the most frightening and beautiful things I've ever witnessed. One guitar. One bass. And somehow they make the formless overwhelming sound of space itself. Outer space. This is the sound of the limninal beyond, the sound of interstellar regions, what might stretch on between us and death. Which is sort of comforting because it's scary at first but eventually it reveals music arrestingly rich with beauty and meaning.

2 – Pulse Demon, Merzbow

"Music" cannot, has never, and will never get more extreme than this. Imagine hell as the never-ending drilling of a healthy tooth. Merzbow makes Slayer sound like Donnie and Marie, and "Pulse Demon" is about as severe as it gets. This is the edge of music, of sound in general, it's been said of his work. Beyond that awaits nothingness, the void. I'm not suggesting you listen. Don't. I'm saying I'm happy there is someone in the world who's made his life's work (since 1979) a constant reach for the limits of sound, to see what those limits reveal, no matter how brutal.

1 – Disintegration Loops, William Basinski

Basinski, a celebrated avant-garde composer who often works with loops, was trying to save some old magnetic tape recordings by transferring them to digital format. As the transfer progressed the magnetic tape itself began to disintegrate. This happened on September 11, 2001. At least according to the myth now accrued around the work. The recording itself was of a mournful horn, string, and percussive loop. Sort of what one might expect to hear as a beloved fallen king's body was taken through the streets on the shoulders of his sons. It is heart wrenching, but also elegiac, even as the loop itself eventually erases. Basisnki: "The music isn't just decaying — it does, it dies — but the entire life and death of each of these unique melodies was recorded to another medium for eternity. So that blew my mind, as someone who grew up Catholic, to see that that is a possibility." This is the sound of corporeal passing and decay. Pure melancholy. It's also weirdly comforting, even alluring. Why? Because it gives death shape. It gets us close. It's repetitive and for that promises meaning and revelation, and so we wait, headphones on, weeping, hoping no one's watching, and we wait.

And then it's gone.


Scott Cheshire and High as the Horses' Bridles links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Brooklyn Rail review
Flavorwire review
Washington Post review

Brooklyn Rail interview with the author
Electric Literature interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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WORD Bookstores Books of the Week - July 16, 2014

In the Largehearted Word series, the staff of Brooklyn's WORD bookstore highlights several new books released this week.

WORD Bookstores are independent neighborhood bookstores in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and Jersey City, New Jersey. Our primary goal is to be whatever our communities needs us to be, which currently means carrying everything from fiction to nonfiction to absurdly cute cards and stationery. In addition, we're fiends for a good event, from the classic author reading and Q&A to potlucks and a basketball league (and anything set in a bar). If a weekly dose of WORD here isn't enough for you, follow us on Twitter: @wordbookstores.


Dirty Wings

Dirty Wings
by Sarah McCarry

WORD favorite Sarah McCarry follows 2013's All Our Pretty Songs with this stirring, punked-up recast of the Persephone myth.


Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever

Henry & Glenn Forever & Ever
by Tom Neely and Friends

A cabal of comic artists and illustrators take the mickey out of mainstream countercultures most serious personages.


The Mad and the Bad

The Mad and the Bad
by Jean-Patrick Manchette

As brutal as American Psycho with the craft of Raymond Chandler, this New York Review Books reissue restores an unsettling masterpiece to the pantheon.


Virtual Unreality

Virtual Unreality
by Charles Seife

Most conversations. debates, pontifications, reports. and mere anecdotes inspire a particularly contemporary response -- is it true, or is it Internet true? Charles Seife's study examines the notion of veracity in the age of Wikipedia expertise.


WORD Brooklyn links:

WORD website
WORD Tumblr
WORD on Twitter
WORD's Facebook page
WORD's Flickr photos


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics & graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)

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