July 18, 2016

Book Notes - Josh Fomon "Though We Bled Meticulously"

Though We Bled Meticulously

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Josh Fomon's debut poetry collection Though We Bled Meticulously is as impressive as it is startling and poignant.


In his own words, here is Josh Fomon's Book Notes music playlist for his poetry collection Though We Bled Meticulously:


Mixtape for Though We Bled Meticulously:



Robert Francis—"Nightfall"

Though We Bled Meticulously is a book that begins in flux—there is a rupture that happens and leads to a series of what I believe to be expansions and contractions—destructions and recreations of piecing everything together. In making this mix, Robert Francis' crooning refrain of "Honey, I'll be gone before the nightfall" captures the urgency and energy the book latches onto immediately. The speaker plays revenant but knows it's never enough to return because so much changes.

WU LYF—"Spitting Blood"

WU LYF existed briefly yet left a beacon of tremendous, raw energy. Ellery James Roberts' gravelly, breaking voice acts as a conduit that channels a twisted, beautiful landscape of tension and viscera. Spitting blood is a radical image—a presumed act of aggression against the mouth. It speaks or opens, but it drains a corporeal symbol and toil. "Cut me, I won't even bleed/My blood's as lazy as the mums and dads/Whose fantastic mundane can't be all bad."

TWBM was shaped by the energy and explosiveness of WU LYF and in WU LYF this book forms a harbinger: "We are so happy, happy to see/All of our children will run blind and free." There is so much that wants to get out and see what happens when we aim to destroy that reminds me so much of Raphael Montañez Ortiz's "Piano Destruction Piece." Illusory and incantatory—everything is hinged on a moment about to fail.

Warpaint—"Elephants"

I oftentimes am obsessed with bands that create landscapes in which a state of tension draws me through the song—I think every single one of the mix reflects this. The breaks and tempo changes of "Elephants" and modulated vocals of this amazing band instantly have me hooked. This song and "Beetles" made me consider pacing in language where "every breath just bites/into the soft/space of calm about you."

LCD Soundsystem—"Home"

Home is a feeling of time and space. I play this song on the jukebox whenever I am home in Iowa City because it allows me to remember how far I've been. "Home" creates a visceral experience of the hot, balmy Iowa summers in badly lit rooms and epic dance parties. In a sense, there is something terrifying in going forth into the world and not looking back. TWBM tries to articulate this wonderment but it doesn't get as much simpler than "You're afraid of what you need."

Everything Everything—"Cough Cough"

"But I'm coming alive/I'm happening now" is such a fascinating couplet—the "But" is a strange reaction that asserts one's aliveness in a way that animates life. There is a certain wonderment in being able to declare this, what it even means. It's caught mid-thought "And that eureka moment hits you like a cop car/And you wake up just head and shoulders in a glass jar."

I've always envisioned TWBM as a post-apocalyptic journey into space and the reconciliation of what that means. This song is the perfect frenetic movement into making sense of chaotic rupture.

The Naked and Famous—"Young Blood"

"Young Blood" is pure nostalgia. From "trying to find the in-betweens" and the vitality of youth, this song is wild fun and joy. There is so much love that retracts and coils its complexity in our everyday lives—we just need to remember to see it. I suffer from my own decadent excess with language and "Young Blood" reminds me to revel in it. And it's so much fun.

Mount Eerie—"Between Two Mysteries"

I don't remember how I came to Mount Eerie, but Wind's Poem is a fully realized world. It's a wilderness grown out of noise and quiet moments captured in the experience of jumping into an abyss. Phil Elverum creates a calming and unnerving architecture, which makes this "Between Two Mysteries" a phenomenal waypoint to talk about creating an influential vision in how TWBM connects its selves to other selves and the dark things they do.

Daníel Bjarnason—"Emergence II. Black Breathing"

In the middle of revising TWBM, my friend and sound artist/composer Burke Jam shared Daníel Bjarnason's Over Light Earth. Bjarnason's preternatural, jarring composition helped the manuscript find its internal l'appel du vide.

This particular piece captures the subversive and calculated estrangement of movement in sound and crescendos into a fully inhabited urgency I've always wanted to mimic in my writing. Coupled with Ori Gersht's "Big Bang," I soon realized how I needed to approach the book and its revision—destroying and rebuilding language into moments of exploding wonderment and terror and then trying to piece together what remained.

Iggy Pop—"In The Lobby"

Post Pop Depression is a blistering, powerful masterpiece. "In The Lobby" is a pulsating blur of bellowing baritone menace with Iggy wailing "I followed my shadow and it led me here/What is the problem if I disappear/And I hope I'm not losing my life tonight." This uncertainty is a kind of urgency at the core of the book—what life instills when facing its counterpart.

Colour Revolt—"Blood In Your Mouth"

Colour Revolt reminds me of Arnold Odermatt's Karambolage series of photographs wherein we view the immediate fallout after horrific car crashes, void of any human predicament—we're only allowed the documentation of the crash, which creates an incredibly powerful energy and anxiety of causation and menace. There is this welling up that needs to get out and this song lets it all out. When blood is in the mouth, it's a multisensory, visceral experience. This song is so vengeful and yet, there is a yearning supplicant performing a ritual: "If you bury me, I'll bury you" and "Wait for grace/to set in/you don't/offer love as hope."

Broken Water—"Heal"

To say that listening to Broken Water influenced how TWBM was written is an understatement. The trancelike lure of noise throughout their incredible catalog creates a wall of sound I have never been able to not get swept up in. There is so much tension ready to burst forth at any given point it's like Yoko Ono's "Cut Piece." "Heal" lulls the listener into a sense of calm and then throttles a chainsaw. What strikes me most about this particular song is the steady, assuring bass line that confidently marches all the while being shredded with a cacophony of glorious guitar shrieks. I get lost in Broken Water's music how I get lost in language and cannot imagine a better place to be.

Beach House—"Silver Soul"

Beach House, for me, is not a listening experience so much as navigating into calm unknown. The modulating backing mixed with possessing vocals creates a perfect realm that is not our own. "It's a vision, complete illusion, yeah." What fascinates me about this song is the assertion that "It is happening again." Because it is, and because we need it to happen—it is so wondrous when art becomes this engrossing and meticulous. It's the incantation and the mystic wanderings where we feel immense amongst the stars—the ineffable energy propelling everything forward.

Sharon Van Etten—"We Are Fine"

This song captures the anxieties of creating in such a strange, smart way—Van Etten uses the imperative but doesn't create action—she asserts declarative measures which roll into more directions toward a nameless other. The loss, the love, the awakening, it's heartbreaking, but hopeful. In TWBM the speaker needs to say "Say I'm alright. I'm alright."

Deep Sea Diver—"Ships"

There were too many local Seattle bands that I wanted to include, but the sadness and desperation in Deep Sea Diver's "Ships" is a testament to the acts we take to love and continue to be loved. The ambiguity of hope and loss and determination are all at once admirable and heartbreaking and this is everything amazing in the world—there is so much uncertainty but we must try or else we never go anywhere. Even in the face of utter failure, we persist.

Bosnian Rainbows—"Red"

Red is an elegy for lost love and in lost love "Spring kisses all my thoughts/These strands of memories invading us throughout life" but "All feelings I have for red are dead/Are dead, are dead and lonesome." This isolation, once self-affirmed, is an empowering feeling. It begins a forward trajectory of recovery, of recovering the memories of who we once were and who we have the potential to become. Moments of order dot landscapes and loves and losses but they only mark a journey in how we evolve.

Angel Olsen—"Sweet Dreams"

"Sweet Dreams" bleeds sorrow and hope and all the ambiguities trying to love and live provide. This song destroys me and puts me back together and tells me to "sleep tight." What strikes me most is Olsen's realization of self-love in order to love better: "And I love you most/I love you most/when I first found love in my soul/and I'll give to you/give it up to you/when I first find it in myself." Most of all, this song goes in search of wisdom—it feels so genuinely. I'm jealous of how incredible this song inhabits the world with confidence. Olsen captures life in flux—the ambiguities so important to TWBM.


Josh Fomon and Though We Bled Meticulously links:

excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us





July 18, 2016

Shorties (Mary Gaitskill Profiled, The New Daniel Johnston Graphic Novel, and more)

The Observer profiled author Mary Gaitskill.


Scott McClanahan talked to Salon about his new graphic novel The Incantations of Daniel Johnston.


Would you like to support Largehearted Boy? Here are a couple of ways you can help.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
The Eternal Wonder by Pearl S. Buck
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories by Ken Liu
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

A History of the Future by James Kunstler
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume


Big Issue North profiled author Marlon James.


Stream video from Belly's first reunion show.


BuzzFeed features a new essay by Max Porter.


Stream a new song by The Head and the Heart.


Author Jessica Winter discussed her favorite books on girl power at The Week.


Beach House covered the Korgis’ “Everybody’s Got To Learn Sometime”."


Salon interviewed Ann and Jeff VanderMeer about their new anthology The Big Book of Science Fiction.


Stream a new My Morning Jacket song.


Paste listed the best comics of 2016 so far.


Noisey interviewed singer-songwriter Nick Monaco.


The Telegraph recommended summer reading.


The Atlantic on the need for independent literary presses.


Houstonia profiled singer-songwriter Robert Ellis.


Ebook on sale for $1.99 today: Kurt Vonnegut's novel Mother Night.


PopMatters continued its countdown of the greatest 100 alternative singles of the '90s.


Cynthia Ozick talked to Weekend Edition about her book Critics, Monsters, Fanatics, and Other Literary Essays.


R.I.P., Alan Vega of Suicide.


Ploughshares shared new Viet Thanh Nguyen short fiction.


The A.V. Club recommended Rilo Kiley songs.


BOMB interviewed author Geoff Dyer.


Marianne Faithfull discussed her favorite books at the New York Times.


Rumaan Alam on writing his novel Rich and Pretty at Literary Hub.


John Prine discussed his new album of classic country duets, For Better, Or Worse, with The Record.


The Rumpus interviewed author Amy Rose Spiegel.


NME listed the best songs of 2016 so far.


Rachel Herron interviewed author Wendy C. Ortiz.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

July 17, 2016

Largehearted Boy Weekly Wrap-Up - July 17th, 2016

A list of the past week's Largehearted Boy features:


Book Notes: (authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates to their book)

Caroline Angell for her novel All the Time in the World
Jennifer Spiegel and Paul Fuhr for the anthology Dead Inside
John Domini for his short story collection Movieola!
Maryse Meijer for her short fiction collection Heartbreaker
Michael Homolka for his poetry anthology Antiquity
Tara Altebrando for her novel The Leaving


Weekly New Book Recommendations:

Atomic Books Comics Preview (recommended new comics and graphic novels)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


New Music Recommendations:

The Week's Interesting Music Releases


And of course, the daily literature and music news and link posts:

Shorties (news & links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Antiheroines
Atomic Books Comics Preview
Book Notes
Cover Song Collections
Lists
weekly music release lists
musician/author Interviews
Note Books
Soundtracked
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

July 15, 2016

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - July 15, 2016

Amanda And Jack Palmer

Amanda Palmer's covers album with her father You Got Me Singing and Heliotropes' Over There That Way are the week's new music highlights.

Reissues include three Sonic Youth releases on vinyl (Murray Street, Rather Ripped, Sonic Nurse) and remastered vinyl albums from Peter Gabriel (So
UP, US) and XTC (English Settlement, Skylarking).

What new music are you looking forward to or enjoying this week?


This week's interesting music releases:

Amanda And Jack Palmer: You Got Me Singing
Bjork: Vulnicura Live
Boss Hog: Brood Star EP [vinyl]
Cassius Clay: I Am the Greatest (reissue)
Clams Casino: 32 Levels
Dave Matthews Band: Crash (Anniversary Edition) (remastered) [vinyl]
Frank Zappa: The Crux of the Biscuit
Frank Zappa: Frank Zappa for President
Good Charlotte: Youth Authority
Heliotropes: Over There That Way
Jeff Beck: Loud Hailer
Jherek Bischoff: Cistern
Justin Timberlake: Can't Stop the Feeling
Lindstrom: Windings [vinyl]
Little Richard: Mono Box: Complete Specialty/Vee-Jay Albums (5-LP box set)
Michael Kiwanuka: Love & Hate
Modern English: After the Snow (reissue)
Motorhead: Clean Your Clock (2xLP Boxset w/ CD, DVD, BluRay and Ltd Edition Metal Motorhead Medal)
NEEDTOBREATHE: Hardlove
Nina Simone: The Philips Years (7-LP box set) [vinyl]
Pedro the Lion: Progress (reissue) [vinyl]
Peter Gabriel: So (remastered) [vinyl]
Peter Gabriel: UP (remastered [vinyl]
Peter Gabriel: US (remastered [vinyl]
Scharpling & Wurster: Live at Third Man Records [vinyl]
Snoop Dogg: Coolaid
Sonic Youth: Murray Street (reissue) [vinyl]
Sonic Youth: Rather Ripped (reissue) [vinyl]
Sonic Youth: Sonic Nurse (reissue) [vinyl]
Steven Tyler: We’re All Somebody From Somewhere
Sun Ra: Space Is The Place (reissue) [vinyl]
Various Artists: Classic Folk Songs for Kids from Smithsonian Folkways
Various Artists: Everybody Wants Some!! (Music From The Motion Picture) [vinyl]
Various Artists: Ghostbusters (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
Various Artists: The Music Of DC Comics: Volume 2
XTC: English Settlement: Deluxe Edition (remastered) (2-LP) [vinyl]
XTC: Skylarking: Deluxe Edition (remastered) (2-LP) [vinyl]
William S. Burroughs: Let Me Hang You [vinyl]


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Essential and Interesting 2015 Year-End Music Lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Atomic Books Comics Preview - July 15, 2016

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics, graphic novels, and books.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. He also runs the Mutant Funnies Tumblr.

Atomic Books has been named one of BuzzFeed's Great American Bookstores, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Elf Cat in Love

Elf Cat in Love
by James Kochalka

Elf Cat goes on an adventure and finds love. To read a James Kochalka book is to experience a sort of magical wonderment that seems childlike but is actually profoundly mature.


Gullivera

Gullivera
by Milo Manara

This one is adults only. Gullivera is Manara's erotic adaptation of the Jonathan Swift classic - and it is some of his best work, adult or not.


Hellbound Lifestyle

Hellbound Lifestyle
by Kaeleigh Forsyth / Alabaster Pizzo

This collaboration project is utterly charming. Forsyth collected daily observations and thoughts, and she sent them to Pizzo to illustrate. And the results are funny, weird, colorful and hard to stop reading.


I Am Legion

I Am Legion
by Fabien Nury / John Cassaday

It's World War II and the Nazis have found a girl with supernatural powers that they seek to exploit. As the name suggests, it may be a little vampire-y.


Love Addict: Confessions Of A Serial Dater

Love Addict: Confessions Of A Serial Dater
by Koren Shadmi

Love Addict takes a look at the world of modern dating. After a breakup, K discovers a dating app that he quickly becomes addicted to. A little addiction never hurt anyone, right?


Monstress Volume 1

Monstress Volume 1
by Marjorie M. Liu / Sana Takeda

If beautiful and weird is your thing, then Monstress is your thing. It's 1900s matriarchal Asia that looks a bit Steampunk and a bit Art Deco. Here a teenage girl discovers she has a psychic link to a monster.


Notes Volume 1: Born To Be A Larve

Notes Volume 1: Born To Be A Larve
by Boulet

Collecting the first year of Boulet's blog entries (in comic form). It's a glimpse of life in Paris with an amazing illustrative style.


Time Clock: Eye Of The Majestic Creature Volume 3

Time Clock: Eye Of The Majestic Creature Volume 3
by Leslie Stein

Time Clock is Stein's first complete graphic novel, and her illustrations have never been richer. Brooklynite Larrybear has to contend with a drinking problem, running a restaurant and a hurricane - but it's all told with Stein's unique brand of weirdness.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Mutant Funnies


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2015" Book Lists

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (An Excerpt from Elena Ferrante's New Book, Grimes' Claire Boucher on Songwriting, and more)

Read an excerpt (PDF link) from Elena Ferrante's forthcoming nonfiction collection Frantumaglia.


Grimes' Claire Boucher broke down her song "Kill v. Maim" at the Song Exploder podcast.


Would you like to support Largehearted Boy? Here are a couple of ways you can help.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
The Eternal Wonder by Pearl S. Buck
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories by Ken Liu
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

A History of the Future by James Kunstler
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume


Stream a new Julia Jacklin song.


Book Riot recommended July's best new small press books.


PopMatters interviewed Martin Bramah of the band Blue Orchids.


Electric Literature interviewed author John D'Agata.


Sharon Van Etten covered the Flaming Lips' "Do You Realize."


The Guardian profiled author James Kelman.


The ten album shortlist for Canada's Polaris Music Prize has been announced.


R.I.P., author Carolyn See.


Katy Goodman and Greta Morgan discussed their covers album Take It, It's Yours with American Songwriter.


Dennis Cooper on Google deleting his blog.


Stream a new Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings song.


The New Orleans Review interviewed author Adrian Van Young.


Stream a new Wilco song.


Electric Literature recommended novels set on the beach.


The Julie Ruin covered Courtney Barnett's "Pedestrian at Best."


Don DeLillo on what he's learned at Esquire UK.


Filmmaker interviewed Werner Herzog about his online class.


Ebook on sale for $1.99 today: Edwidge Danticat's novel Breath, Eyes, Memory.


Stream a new M.I.A. song.


Nobel laureate Herta Muller discussed books and reading with the New York Times.


Paste recommended jazz albums for people who don't like jazz.


Men's Journal interviewed author Richard Russo.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

July 14, 2016

Book Notes - Jennifer Spiegel and Paul Fuhr "Dead Inside"

Dead Inside: Poems and Essays About Zombies

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Inspired by televisions The Walking Dead, Dead Inside is an impressive literary anthology that examines our fascination with the undead through poems and essays.

In their own words, here is Jennifer Spiegel and Paul Fuhr's Book Notes music playlist for the anthology Dead Inside: Poems and Essays About Zombies:


Walker Hymns
prepared by Jennifer Spiegel, featuring Paul Fuhr

Dead Inside, the first title from Foiled Crown Books, is a collaboration. What do two poets and a fiction-writer do when planning a playlist for their anthology of literature about The Walking Dead? They get a music guy on board!

Each of us is musically driven or inspired in individual ways. Personally, I have to admit that the music in the early seasons of The Walking Dead was a big draw. Raw, somber tunes seemed to work against the potential for cheesiness inherent in a zombie show. I created a Pandora Station called The Walking Dead Radio, where I heard "Oats in the Water" by Ben Howard and "Warm Shadow" by Fink. But this is a literary anthology of many voices, so we sought unity. How might we pull together many poets and many prose writers together with melody? Writer Paul Fuhr offered his talents in giving our book a soundtrack! Here’s Paul (we thank him profusely):


When I was asked to curate a playlist for the anthology Dead Inside, I was as honored as I was paralyzed. How could I possibly convey something so specific through just a few songs? And that’s when it dawned on me: I would not have done this subject justice with only a couple of well-chosen tunes. The playlist needed to be epic, sweeping, spectacular—and still, somehow personal. Just as the anthology is about more than merely the notion of “zombie”—it’s a mélange of ideas about our bodies, society, identity, and mortality—so, too, is this playlist larger in scope. As a whole, the playlist can bring about a growing sense of dread as much as it will echo a thundering drive for survival. Taken on their own, however, each song is its own singular commentary on a zombie apocalypse. Some tracks are so sparse that they seem to be grieving; some of them exist in a very narrow, liminal musical space—not quite here nor there, the kind of disassociation we would experience in losing civilization as we know it and the routines of our daily lives. There are tracks about things returning to this world, which is not quite the same as it was before. Some of them are catchy earworms that simply infect you. Some are calls to arms. Some of them are broken and hopeless. Some speak to being isolated from everything you know and love. More than anything, this playlist echoes what I imagine would be the human emotional experience of the zombie apocalypse: it’s disorienting, chaotic, lumbering, shifting, and highly specific to wherever you find yourself when it happens. While it may appear dead on the surface, this playlist very much has a pulse:



Terminus: Ital Tek, Hollowed
The Suburbs: My Little Jeans Pocketknife
Letters From The Sky: Civil Twilight, Civil Twilight
Afraid of Everyone: The National, High Violet (Expanded Edition)
Empires: Northeast Party House, Northeast Party House
I Say Fever: Ramona Falls, Intuit
Ebb & Flow: Man Without Country, Foe
The Dark Has Fallen: Air Formation, Daylight Storms
Visiting Statue: Grimes, Visions
Bleed Bleed Bleed: Thieves Like Us, Bleed Bleed Bleed
The Dream Has Faded: Geographer, Myth
Water Hymn: Painted Palms, Canopy
Oshin (Subsume): DIIV, Oshin
Put Me To Sleep: Porcelain Raft, Strange Weekend
Dream Beat: Peaking Lights, Lucifer
Three Seed: Silversun Pickups, Carnavas
Doused: DIIV, OShin
I Will Return: Ratatat, Magnifique
Spectre: Radiohead, Spectre
Octobre: Edith Crash, Partir
Your Hand In Mine: Explosions In The Sky, The Earth is Not a Cold Dead Place
Brain Damage: Pink Floyd, The Dark Side of the Moon
Eclipse: Pink Floyd, The Dark Side of the Moon
Gunshot: Lykke Li, I Never Learn
Last Song (feat. Matt Berninger): Clogs, Matt Berninger, The Creatures in the Garden Of Lady Walton
Opening: Philip Glass, Martin Jacoby, Opening – Single
Signals – 2005 Digital Remaster: Brian Eno, Apollo
Both Sides Are Even: The Boxer Rebellion, The Cold Still
Regular Disease: Blind Mr. Jones, Stereo Musicals
Wyoming: Heather Woods Broderick, Glider
Loomer – Remastered Version: My Bloody Valentine, Loveless
Pancake: Tori Amos, Scarlet’s Walk
Hey Moon: John Maus, We Must Become the . . .
Metallic Cloud: Damien Jurado, Brothers and Sisters o . . .
Gethsemane: Dry the River, Gethsemane
Electric Man: Rival Sons, Great Western Valkyrie
Windows: Angel Olsen, Burn Your Fire For No . . .
Only Skin: The Spring Standards, Yellow//Gold
Mumble: Whirr, Sway
Song to the Siren: Amen Dunes, Cowboy Worship
Vesper: Itel Tek, Hollowed
Dust: H/ELOS, Full Circle
------: Doveman, With MY Left Hand I R . . .
Nitrous Gas: Frightened Rabbit, Pedestrian Verse
Echoes: Washed Out, Within and Without
Peregrine: Story Books, Peregrine
Tempest: Lucius, Tempest
Exposure: Glasser, Interiors
Glas/Green: Solomon Grey, Dathanna – Sounds of . . .
Heart Space: Vex’d Anneka, Cloud Seed
Wall of Light: Om Unit, Threads
Inside/outside: The Free Association, Code 46
Hypnotised: Broadway Project Da . . ., Film Works Vol. 1
Winter Sleep: Valgeir Sigurooson, D. . . , Ekvilbrium
The Obeisant Vine (Hammock Re . . .: Hellos Remixed
Stem – LP: DJ Shadow, Reconstructed: The . . .
Missed: Julia Kent, Green and Grey
No Place to Go: The Oscillation, From Tomorrow
Cult of silver: RA, Bloodline
All My Prayers: Magic Castles, Magic Castles
The Field: Jon Hopkins, How I Live Now (Origi . . .)
Stone: Bird Courage, Mala Manu
Rose Quartz: Toro y Moi, Anything in Return
Open Eye Signal: Jon Hopkins, Immunity
Backchannels: Shearwater, Jet Plane and Oxbow
Apply: Glasser, Ring
Berlin: RY X, Berlin EP
The Quotidian Beasts: Phosophorescent, Muchacho
Something In The Way: Nirvana, MTV Unplugged in N . . .
Flooded Eye: Negative Lovers, .38 Loves Me 10”
Blackout: Sennen, Where the Light Gets In
The Sun’s Coming Up and My P . . .: Young Galaxy, Swing Your Heartach . . .
Posters: Youth Lagoon, The Year of Hibernati . . .
Runaway: Szymon, Tigersnap
Talisman: Air, Moon Safari
Another Wave From You: M83, Hurry Up, We’re Drea . . .
God’s Whisper: Raury, God’s Whisper
If I Had A Tail: Queens of the Stone, . . .Like Clockwork
Still Cold: Mazzy Star, Among My Swan
My Body Betrayed Me: Black Wing, . . . Is Doomed
Sundowner: Blanck Mass, Blanck Mass
Reach For The Dead: Boards of Canada, Tomorrow’s Harvest
Cradle: Dreamscape, La-Di-Da Recordings
The Birth and Death Of The Day: Explosions In The Sky, All of a Sudden I Miss . . .
Get Back: Fog Lake, There’s a Spirit, There . . .
Still Life: The Horrors, Skying
Untitled: Interpol, Turn On The Bright Li . . .
Farewell/Goodbye: M83, Before The Dawn He . . .
Staralfur: Sigur Ros, Agaetis Byrjun
Valley of Gardens: Teen Daze, Morning World
Swirl: Westkust, Swirl
Happy Alone: Saintseneca, Dark Arc
In Every Mind: Red Sparrowes The Fear Is Excruciati . . .
New Topia: This Will Destroy, Another Language
Contrails: Glowworm, The Coachlight Woods
Decks Dark: Radiohead, A Moon Shaped Pool
All I Need: Radiohead, In Rainbows
The Funeral: Stars Of The Lid, Carte-de-visita
Subtext: John Foxx, Translucence + Drift . . .
Their Memories – 2005 Digital Re . . .: Harold Budd, The Pearl


Jennifer Spiegel, Paul Fuhr and Dead Inside: Poems and Essays About Zombies links:

Jennifer Spiegel's website
Paul Fuhr's The Fuhrious Podcast


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - July 14, 2016

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Pond

Pond
by Claire-Louise Bennett

A series of twenty short stories told, ostensibly, from the fixed perspective of a semi-reclusive female narrator. Her soliloquies of varying lengths animate the minutiae of her rural existence. Bennett’s elegant and intimate prose have been compared to Lydia Davis and Jean Rhys.


Cook Korean

Cook Korean
by Robin Ha

Learn how to Cook Korean with Robin Ha’s new graphic novel! Ha offers step by step illustrated instructions for over sixty recipes. From traditional dishes to fusion cuisine, you’ll learn how to make kimchi, bibimbap, spicy rice cakes and all about Korean food culture while you’re at it.


String Theory

String Theory
by David Foster Wallace

This slim and attractive volume collects all of DFW’s writings on tennis for the first time. For those familiar with Wallace’s ouevre they may recognize tennis as a subject dear to his heart. In this compilation his unique analytical prowess is evident as he moves through his own short-lived career as a “near great” player to ruminations on the game and greatness.


Yevengeny Onegin

Yevengeny Onegin
by Alexander Pushkin

It’s only fitting that Pushkin Press should release this vibrant new translation of a pivotal work by its namesake, Alexander Pushkin. A novel in verse, it chronicles the life and times of hapless, bored aristocrat Yevengeny through love, death, and duels. By turns playful, philosophical, and sorrow-laden - this energetic work has been described as the lodestar of all Russian literature!


Problems

Problems
by Jade Sharma

Brought to you by Coffee House Press and Emily Books - your haven for weird books by women - is Jade Sharma’s debut novel, Problems. Narrator Maya has been surviving in New York City on a dead-end bookstore job and part time heroin addiction for years. When her principal relationships dissolve her fragile situation implodes. Rest assured that Sharma succeeds in breaking every cliche about redemption narratives


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (An Interview with Helen DeWitt, A List of the Best Post-Punk Albums, and more)

Vulture profiled author Helen DeWitt.


Paste listed the best post-punk albums.


Would you like to support Largehearted Boy? Here are a couple of ways you can help.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
The Eternal Wonder by Pearl S. Buck
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories by Ken Liu
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

A History of the Future by James Kunstler
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume


Guernica interviewed author Jade Sharma.


Essential albums from Stones Throw Records.


Electric Literature interviewed author Chelsea Martin.


NPR Music is streaming The Amazing's new album Ambulance.


The Fader interviewed author Marlon James.


Stream a new LVL UP song.


Electric Literature interviewed author Brad Watson.


Littler covered the Muffs' "Big Mouth."


The Guardian listed the best books about the Iraq war.


NPR Music is streaming Elysia Crampton's new album Elysia Crampton Presents: Demon City.


The Paris Review launched a new series by cartoonist Vanessa Davis.


The Bad Plus covered Prince's "The Beautiful Ones."


Literary Hub interviewed author Ben Lerner.


Stream a new song by Itasca.


The Independent recommended new literary crime fiction.


Turntable Kitchen listed the best cover songs of all time.


Bookworm interviewed author Geoff Dyer.


Stream a new Nedelle Torrisi song.


Miami Herald book critic Connie Ogle discussed summer reading with WLRN.


Beach Slang covered the Replacements' "Can't hardly Wait" with Craig Finn.

Stream a new song by the band.


Ebook on sale for $1.99 today: Heidi Durrow's novel The Girl Who Fell from the Sky.


Stream a new song by Flock of Dimes (side project of Wye Oak's Jenn Wasner).


LitReactor interviewed author Donald Ray Pollock.


Stream a new PJ Harvey song.


Electric Literature profiled five women writers with an exceptional sense of place.


American Songwriter examined the musical heritage of Memphis.


The Millions previewed the best nonfiction from the second half of 2016.


Noisey interviewed musician Steve Gunn.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn shared the year's best fiction (so far).



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

July 13, 2016

Book Notes - Michael Homolka "Antiquity"

Antiquity

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Michael Homolka's debut poetry collection Antiquity is innovative and powerful as it brings the ancient and modern worlds together.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Homolka's alluring debut seamlessly tiles scenes of past and present to create a mosaic that is constantly conscious of the inescapability of time...…. Aware that he is presenting perennial human questions in new imagery, Homolka lets his metaphors do the work so that the craft, not cleverness, shines through."


In his own words, here is Michael Homolka's Book Notes music playlist for his poetry collection Antiquity:


The poems in this collection stage meeting grounds for the irreconcilable. Aryans and Jews find themselves face-to-face in a common afterlife. Heroes of ancient Greece and Rome puzzle over American values. The Black Death reprises itself, this time to victims already aware of the historical significance. Antiquity churns to confusion the events, technologies, and beliefs of eras, isolating essential human qualities that do not change with time.



"Music for Strings, Percussion & Celesta" – Bartók

Nothing says disillusionment, disorientation, and despair like Bartók's strings. "Goshen," the sequence that opens the collection, is set in a theoretical afterlife in which Jewish victims and Aryan aggressors must reconcile. The prospects are dim and weird, and a certain amount of disconcerting titillation takes place. "Music for Strings, Percussion & Celeste" would provide the accompaniment to this sequence as well as to the collection as a whole.


"Pennyroyal Tea" – Nirvana

I listened to a lot of Nirvana in high school. "Ode on Quote How to Live," the poem that immediately follows the opening sequence, probably stems from a high-school era cynicism. Feelings of general suckyness come on utterly unfiltered during that time—I don't think I've ever dwelled in them as purely or obligingly since. Few bands I can think of take on feelings of general suckyness as well as Nirvana. This track, for me, captures it best.


"Go West" – Pet Shop Boys

I love ancient Roman poets—Catullus, Horace, Martial, and Juvenal in particular. They neither denied themselves despair nor lay victim to it. They leveled insults at lovers and politicians from which there was no getting up. The first few poems in Section 2 of Antiquity operate along similar lines of viciousness and vulnerability; however, they also attempt to highlight incompatibilities between that ancient mode of hostile direct address and today's less declarative and more self-questioning aesthetics. Why "Go West" for poems that model themselves after the voices of antiquity? I don't know, but it just seems to fit. It's bouncy and festive, but the lyrics point to the futility of trying to start anew. Out West where life is peaceful, skies are blue, and there is sun in wintertime? No—we all know it's Grapes of Wrath, perpetual drought, Schwartzenegger as ex-governor, and one of the most ineffectual public education systems in the country. Shame on everyone, as the Romans poets might say, but we can still bob our heads to a nice beat.


"I'm Leaving You Because I Don't Love You" – Jens Lekman

The refrain of this song is so depressingly direct it's hard not to laugh. The uptempo piano and synth play against the awfulness of the admission with a kind of sensual, celebratory quality. Many of the middle and later poems of Section 2 likewise try to push the limits of plainspokenness with a tone that undercuts. I think the effect is related to the boingy, underwatery nostalgia found in this song.


"Estampes; Pagodes" – Debussy

I don't know how often the time signature changes in this piano piece, but it must be a lot. It's a short work, and feels emblematic of Impressionism, but with maybe more disorientation and uncertainty than I'm imagining was typical. The poem that closes Section 2 is titled "Unjustified Mood on a Monday Evening" and has nods to Napoleon and Monet. I think the poem is lighter-hearted than most of the other poems, and also perhaps performs the act of never quite settling on its direction. More than most composers, I'm never ultimately able to put my finger on what Debussy is getting at. I like this feeling of being left with tones and sensations and everything up in the air.


"Cult of Personality" – Living Colour

Section 3 of Antiquity begins with the poem "Ruins," which traces an encounter between an anonymous contemporary male and the Roman god Jupiter. The god is relaxing by some pillar fragments from one of his ruined temples and figuring out what to do. The unnamed man is trying to ascertain whether or not, after the passing of so much history, he still falls under Jupiter's spiritual jurisdiction. He has trouble getting the god's attention since the god is listening to music on his headphones. The song Jupiter is listening to, despite the serenity of the seaside breeze that blows through the quiet scene, has to be "Cult of Personality." It's just about raucous enough.


"I Get Nervous" – Lower Dens

This song feels like a strange overlap between wanting to start over and wanting to take stock. I think of the track as playing in conjunction with "Modern Sensibility," which explores a related ambivalence, though more from the standpoint of poets and aesthetics. The music is mostly instrumental; the poem comes close to something like a mood without words.


"Let Me Walk, Lord, by Your Side" – The Stanley Brothers

"East" is set during a disastrous flood somewhere in late nineteenth century small-town USA. People's lives and property are getting rapidly destroyed as the poem begins, and they wonder what this might be saying about their relationship to God. The mandolins and vocal harmonies of the Stanley Brothers connote an era of late frontier America and the still robust desire to walk with the Lord in the midst of adversity.


"Bottle Up and Go" – Lead Belly

Toward the middle of "East," people are swept away involuntarily but also do their fair share of abandoning others. The urgent, almost hectic, feel of Lead Belly's voice matches the poem's flurries of split-second decisions with lasting consequences.


"White Dove" – The Stanley Brothers

"East" concludes with somber assessment, and looks ahead to what will likely be a long emotional aftermath. The refrain of the Stanley Brothers' song—"I live my life in sorrow / since mother and daddy are dead"—speaks well to the sentiment at the end of the poem. I think this song would be playing somewhere after the town had been razed and regressed once again to prairie.


"Milo Hayward" – Jeremy Pelt

It's difficult at times to predict whether this track is stopping or starting. Piano chords slash at the air; trumpet and sax struggle at (but also comment from) the surface. The later poems in Section 3 deal with lack of certainty in a more choppy and obtrusive way than some of the collection's earlier softer edges. I think three poems in particular—"Transients," "History Moves in Waves," and "A History of Art,"—also move in stops and starts. Restlessness, some levity, transience as a kind of grating given.


"Sister Europe" – Psychedelic Furs

The track "Sister Europe" feels unsettlingly prescient with its flangey swooshes and chorusy guitar riff. Resignation permeates vocals and instruments alike. "Sister of mine. Home again." I can't quite believe the same sister is returning to the same home as before, nor do I think I'm expected to. "Emanation," the collection's final sequence, is set during one of outbreaks the Black Plague among victims who have already been made aware of the outcome. A lot of Antiquity centers on latter-day attempts—both personal and more general—to return to life exactly as it was in the past, the impossibility of ever doing so, and the counter-impossibility of ever moving on.


Michael Homolka and Antiquity links:

Library Journal review
Publishers Weekly review

The Southeast Review interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Favorite Albums of 2016 (So Far)

These are the seven albums I have recommended most to friends, Largehearted Boy readers, and complete strangers in 2016 so far (my personal metric for favorite music).

My favorite album of the year? Easily Mitski's Puberty 2.

Stream these albums on Spotify:


My favorite eleven albums of 2015:


Anohni: Hopelessness


Big Thief: Masterpiece


Car Seat Headrest: Teens Of Denial


Mitski: Puberty 2


Savages: Adore Life


School of Seven Bells: SVIIB


Whitney: Light Upon The Lake


also at Largehearted Boy:

Largehearted Boy's Favorite Books of 2016 (So Far)

2015 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2010 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2009 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2008 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2007 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2006 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2005 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2004 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2003 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2002 Largehearted Favorite Albums

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (The Year's Best Nonfiction So Far, Shearwater Covered Bauhaus, and more)

Vol. 1 Brooklyn listed the year's best nonfiction so far.


Shearwater covered Bauhaus's "Kick in the Eye."


Would you like to support Largehearted Boy? Here are a couple of ways you can help.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
The Eternal Wonder by Pearl S. Buck
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories by Ken Liu
Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

A History of the Future by James Kunstler
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume


Arab Strap's Malcolm Middleton discussed his favorite albums at The Quietus.


The Chicago Review of Books interviewed author Patricia Engel.


The Literary Hub podcast interviewed composer Nico Muhly.


The Guardian examined the new wave of feminist, confessional memoirs.


Stream a new Ultimate Painting song.


Electric Literature interviewed author Ramona Ausubel.


The New York Times interviewed Kathleen Hanna.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt of Rikki Ducornet's new novel Brightfellow.


Stream a new Hiss Golden Messenger song.


Full Stop interviewed filmmaker Whit Stillman.


Esquire examined Paul Thomas Anderson's influence on music videos.


Literary Hub features an excerpt from Yuri Herrera’s novel The Transmigration of Bodies.


Festival Playlister shares setlists from music festivals.


Tor.com explored fictional comics in novels.


All Songs Considered shared its favorite songs about ice cream.


Mark Z. Danielewski is soliciting cat pictures for volume 4 of his The Familiar series.


Paste profiled Australian singer-songwriter Sophie Payten, AKA Gordi.


Jeff Zentner talked to Bustle about his forthcoming second novel Goodbye Days.


St. Vincent covered the Golden Girls theme song.


Read new nonfiction about Harlan County, Kentucky by Elyssa East at the Oxford American.


Drowned in Sound shared an excerpt from music critic Everett True's forthcoming book The Electric Storm.


Warren Ellis talked to WIRED about his new digital serialized novel Normal.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Google
  Web largeheartedboy.com