March 12, 2019

Shorties (Lawrence Ferlinghetti's San Francisco, Cherry Glazerr's Tiny Desk Concert, and more)

Lawrence Ferlinghetti

The New York Times visited Lawrence Ferlinghetti's San Francisco.


Cherry Glazerr visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


March's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson
The Moviegoer by Walker Percy
The Patriots by Sana Krasikov


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Josh Denslow.


Stream a new song by Karen O & Danger Mouse.


Social Text shared an excerpt from one of my favorite book of the year, Trisha Low's memoir Socialist Realism.


Stream a new Weyes Blood song.


The Cut profiled author Halle Butler.


Noisey reconsidered Wilco's Summerteeth album on its 20th anniversary.


The A.V. Club interviewed author Lindy West.


The Arcade Fire covered "Baby Mine."


Elle recommended spring's best best books.


NYCTaper shared a recent Oneida live performance.


BuzzFeed shared an excerpt from Mallory Smith's memoir, Salt in My Soul.


Noisey interviewed Foals' frontman Yannis Philippakis.


Out recommended queer books to read this month.


Stream a new song by Bill MacKay.


Stylist recommended memoirs by black women.


Stream a new song by the Faint.


Book Riot recommended African comics and graphic novels.


Stream a new Younghusband song.


PBS NewsHour interviewed author Marlon James.


NYCTaper shared a recent live performance by Oneida.


Ngugi Wa Thiong'o discussed his new story collection, Minutes of Glory, with Morning Edition.

Read an excerpt from the book.


Helado Negro broke down every song on his new album, This Is How You Smile, at Pitchfork.


The Harvard Crimson profiled author and critic Hilton Als.


Charlotte Talks interviewed author Jeff Jackson.


Read a new Sally Rooney short story in the New Yorker.


Therese Svoboda recommended books about the prairies at BookMarks.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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March 11, 2019

Shorties (Haruki Murakami Interviewed, Wilco's Summerteeth Album Reconsidered, and more)

Summerteeth

The Times Literary Supplement interviewed author Haruki Murakami.


Stereogum reconsidered Wilco's Summerteeth album on its 20th anniversary.


March's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

The Life To Come by Michelle de Kretser

eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

Moby Dick by Herman Melvile


Helado Negro played guest DJ at All Songs Considered.


Between the Covers interviewed author Marlon James.


Amanda Palmer visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


Electric Literature interviewed author and actress Amber Tamblyn.


Mark Mallman discussed his memoir The Happiness Playlist with The Current.


Paste recommended 2019's best audiobooks.


SPIN recommended essential Townes Van Zandt songs.


Vulture profiled author John Lanchester.


Stream two new Local Natives songs.


The Paris Review interviewed author Mitchell S. Jackson.


All Things Considered profiled singer-songwriter Stella Donnelly.


The Strategist recommended books to understand socialism.


Stereogum recommended essential songs in 7/4 songs.


Jacob Tobia discussed his memoir,Sissy: A Coming-of-Gender Story, with Salon.


Stream a new Fennesz song.


The Guardian interviewed author Elizabeth McCracken.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 8, 2019

Shorties (Spring's Best Books, New Music by Mary Lattimore & Mac McCaughan, and more)

Amy Hempel

Book Riot recommended spring's best books.


Stream a new song by Mary Lattimore and Mac McCaughan.


March's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte


Stream an in-studio set by Ellis at Paste.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Gerald Murnane’s A Season on Earth.


NPR Music is streaming Chai's new album, Punk.


The Seattle Review of Books interviewed author Mesha Maren.


Stream a new song by Blushh.


Guernica features new fiction by Lydia Millet.


Stream a new song by the Get Up Kids.


The Daily Star interviewed author Arundhati Roy.


Stream a new Versing song.


Book Riot recommended books on sustainable living.


Stream a new song by No Age guitarist Randy Randall.


The Independent listed the best books by women.


Stream a new Black Mountain song.


Artist Kenny Scharf discussed his favorite books at Vulture.


Scott Hirsch shared three cover songs at Aquarium Drunkard.


Bookworm interviewed author Chloe Aridjis.


Stream a new song by Patio.


The Rumpus interviewed author T Kira Madden.


Literary Hub shared a conversation between authors Salvatore Scibona and Victor LaValle.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 7, 2019

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - March 6, 2019

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Gingerbread

Gingerbread by Helen Oyeyemi

Helen Oyeyemi has an Angela Carter-esque knack for retelling fairy tales (her 2014 hit Boy, Snow, Bird was a fresh take on Snow White) and her most recent novel, (very) loosely based on Hansel & Gretel, seems partly inspired by her adopted home of Prague. The story centers on Perdita Lee and her mother Harriet, both immigrants to the UK from the possibly imaginary Mitteleuropan country of Druhástrana, who guard a family recipe for gingergread. When teenage Perdita goes in search of her mother’s childhood friend Gretel, the recipe’s long history is uncovered. A spicy, chewy treat of a book!


Binstead’s Safari

Binstead’s Safari by Rachel Ingalls

Following the rediscovery of Rachel Ingall’s cult classic Mrs. Caliban (which partly inspired Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water), New Directions has reissued Ingalls’ 1983 novel Binstead’s Safari. In it, a sour academic’s neglected wife finds new life and new love (possibly with a Lion deity?) while tagging along on her husband’s African research trip. A magical realist romance, Kirkus describes Binstead’s Safari as ‘’Another witty, elegant story from a writer whose atavistic vision of romantic love is resonant and deeply satisfying.’’


Famous Men Who Never Lived

Famous Men Who Never Lived by K Chess

This novel boasts one of the best sci-fi premises we’ve come across in a while: the protagonists are refugees, fleeing an alternate universe in which nuclear war broke out in the United States; now they live in our New York City, which they find both reassuringly familiar and terrible wrong. The plot centers on a couple, Hel and Vikram, one of whom tries to assimilate while the other fixates on The Pyronauts, a science-fiction masterpiece from her universe which never existed in ours, and of which she possesses the only (dog-eared, paperback) copy.


Our History is the Future

Our History is the Future by Nick Estes

Thi powerful book by Lower Brule Sioux historian Nick Estes offer an insider’s perspective on the Standing Rock protests in North Dakota -- the largest indigenous protest movement of the 21st century -- and the genesis of the #NoDAPL resistance. But Estes also folds this recent history into the long tradition of Indigenous resistance in North America, making this book a work of history, a manifesto, and an intergenerational story of struggle that Naomi Klein has called “a major contribution.”


Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys’ Club of Silicon Valley

Brotopia: Breaking Up the Boys’ Club of Silicon Valley by Emily Chang

From Emily Chang, the host of Bloomberg Technology, comes this incisive critique of Silicon Valley’s male-dominated culture, its consequences for women in tech, and some solutions for what to do about it. With insight that comes from firsthand experience, she reveals how the tech industry got so sexist, calls out the worst offenders, and describes how women are fighting back. This paperback edition also includes a new afterword with reports from the high-tech wing of the #MeToo movement.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (The Moral Clarity of Slaughterhouse-Five at 50, New Music from Charly Bliss, and more)

Slaughterhouse-Five

Kevin Powers examined the moral clarity of Kurt Vonnegut's novel Slaughterhouse-Five on its 50th anniversary at the New York Times.


Stream a new Charly Bliss song.


March's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

California: A History by Kevin Starr
Deliverance by James Dickey

eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte


William Basinski discussed The Disintegration Loops with Pitchfork.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed poet Big Bruiser Dope Boy.


Paste visited the Montgomery, Alabama of Hank Williams.


Vox interviewed author Helen Oyeyemi.

The New York Times reviewed Oyeyemi's new novel, Gingerbread.


Stream a new song by Christian Lee Hutson.


K Chess discussed her debut novel Famous Men Who Never Lived with The Rumpus.


Aquarium Drunkard remembered Let's Active drummer Sara Romweber.


Marie Claire recommended feminist books every woman should read.


Stream a new Amyl & the Sniffers song.


Entertainment Weekly interviewed author T Kira Madden.


Stream a new song by the Gotobeds.


David Means discussed his story collection Instructions for a Funeral with All Things Considered.


Stream a new Steph Chura song.


Newsarama interviewed cartoonist Bryan Lee O'Malley.


Stream a new Kate Teague song.


Entertainment Weekly recommended March's best comics.


Stream a new song by Penelope Isles.


The Reason podcast interviewed cartoonist Peter Bagge.


Stream a new song by Lambchop.


The Tab recommended books every feminist should read before they turn 26.


Stream a new Stephen Malkmus song.


Mitchell Jackson discussed his new book, Survival Math, with Salon.


Stream a new Laura Stevenson song.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author Pam Houston.


NYCTaper shared a live performance by William Tyler.


Bookforum interviewed author Leah Dieterich.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 6, 2019

Salvatore Scibona's Playlist for His Novel "The Volunteer"

The Volunteer

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Salvatore Scibona's brilliant novel The Volunteer is both moving and epic.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Scibona’s lyrical yet muscular prose anchors this majestic work as he probes deep philosophical questions about family, identity, belonging, and sacrifice . . . Scibona’s greatest strength is his ability to inhabit each character with profound psychological depth to explore their guilt, doubt, and humanity. This novel rewards close reading and deserves wide readership."


In his own words, here is Salvatore Scibona's Book Notes music playlist for his novel The Volunteer:



Hélène Grimaud, “Partita for Violin Solo No. 2 in D Minor, by J. S. Bach, Transcribed for Piano by Ferruccio Busoni: Chaconne”

Bach wrote the Chaconne three hundred years ago. According to legend, he returned home from a trip and discovered his wife Maria Barbara had died; he wrote the Chaconne in his grief.

This is not a sorrowful piece of music. It doesn’t express one or another emotion: it’s capacious enough to include any emotion you bring to it, and more. Maybe this is what “larger than life” means.

I first heard the Chaconne in a required music class at St. John’s College when I was nineteen. I hadn’t considered myself qualified to hear what was special about music of this kind. I figured it would be a foreign sentiment described in a foreign language. But it wasn’t language at all. It wasn’t code. It was experience, magnified. Immediate and unmistakable.

Busoni’s transcription for piano dates from 1893. This studio recording by Hélène Grimaud, along with her hypnotic performance here, made the piece new to me after I had listened thousands of times to recordings on the violin. Grimaud’s version made me want to write a novel arranged formally like the Chaconne, with its heights, reversals, hopes of redemption, promises, ruin of hopes, and final saving chord. (My first novel also took some formal inspiration from the Chaconne.) A novel demands particular characters and particular action, so what I have written of course falls infinitely short of the everything that the Chaconne contains. On the other hand, you could listen to this piece every day of your life and never fail to hear a new and particular world in it.

Tom Krause and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, “The St. Matthew Passion, by J.S. Bach: 75. Mache dich, mein Herze, rein”

Grimaud’s Chaccone made me want to learn the piano. It seemed the only way to gain access to the inner life of the novel I wanted to write. I had never played an instrument before. I plunged into a rash of practice that, after a couple of years, left me with a case of tendonitis in both wrists. I had to stop playing cold for almost a year and then come back to it in a new way. I regret not having started playing until my 30s.

Both of my novels took more than ten years to write. There must be a shorter way, but I can’t find it. Still, a good long time with a character lets a writer live out on the page what his own history makes impossible. If only I had started the piano earlier—but the Volunteer of the title, called Vollie Frade for the first part of his life, starts to play in early childhood, and I’ve lived another life with him.

When Vollie is born on an Iowa farm in 1950, his parents are middle aged. Even as a child he believes he has come too late for them and represents an unnatural burden. Nothing they do corroborates this. His father especially embodies an abundant gratitude, in spite of adversities, that it takes a long life to accumulate and that I hear in the bass aria “Mache dich, mein Herze, rein” from late in Bach’s St. Matthew Passion. The aria is sung in the voice of Joseph of Arimathea, the rich man in the gospels who obtains Jesus’ dead body from the Romans and puts it in his own tomb: “Make thyself, my heart, clean / I want to bury Jesus himself within me.”

None of the characters in The Volunteer is immune from the hope for a new world and a new life that I hear in this piece.

Vladimir Horowitz, “Kinderszenen, Op. 15, by Robert Schumann: 1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen”

In his youth on the farm, Vollie practices the songs in Schumann’s Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood) while his father listens in the corner of the parlor. The child’s mind evoked in Number 1 (Of Foreign Lands and People), resembles to me the field of a fiction writer’s imagination—the bittersweet hope of escape born in the mind of a child who has been kept safe and doesn’t yet know to be grateful for it.

The Beach Boys, “Good Vibrations”

Music is a backdrop throughout Vollie’s life, never a primary pursuit. After his father dies, he doesn’t play for others and won’t play at all if he believes anyone else can hear him.

During his three tours of duty in Vietnam, he practices on a dummy keyboard he’s made from a tabletop and a Magic Maker, with only his imagination’s ear to make the sound.

He is taken prisoner in Cambodia and held underground for more than a year. There he undergoes a transformation, a separation from self that defines him for the rest of the book. After he’s released, he recuperates in a military hospital in Saigon. He walks the streets, searching for guidance only music can give him. In a Saigon record store, he listens to Schumann and the Beach Boys, “to the coded language of numbers in motion in which an invisible spirit had been trying since he was a small child to communicate some urgent news, some extremely important instruction that after almost twenty years he still failed to comprehend.”

Vladimir Horowitz, “Kinderszenen, Op. 15, by Robert Schumann: 7. Träumerei”

When Vollie eluded me, I would leave the office and practice the seventh of the Kinderszenen (Dreaming). Vollie listens in music for what to do; I listened in this piece for him. His soul is in it. It’s his father’s favorite of the Schumann songs.

Here and there in the piece, Schumann uses the tempo marking ritardando. Vollie’s father, who is illiterate and can’t play music, still feels he knows how the piece should sound and believes his son doesn’t know what “slowly” really means: “Real slowness. Gradually slower. A long slowing walk that ended in repose. A long easeful stride that came someplace to a finish. ‘You figure if you go too slow you won’t get there. Vollie, that ain’t so. Unless you slow down you’ll get to the end and blow right past it.’”

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra and Chorus, “The St. Matthew Passion, by J.S. Bach: 53. Befiel du deine Wege”

We try to “make it new,” but any piece of art bears the mark of the work that inspired us to make something ourselves. Bach took the melody of this chorale (Entrust your Way), repeated in several variations in his St. Matthew Passion, from a love song already more than a century old that had, by Bach’s time, become a Latin hymn.

Bach is famous for his variations—I had listened to the Chaccone for fifteen years before I learned that the entire thing was a continuous stream of variations on its opening four measures. The variations on a theme—A, A1, A2, A3 that eventually return to A—are a musical expression of the structure we may find in a novel, or in the habits of people we know. People repeat themselves; they strive to change; the change takes the form of a variation on what they have done before. But as a piece of music returns to A, to the core theme, a novel, like a person, can return to a trait, an error or saving virtue or drive central to a character’s being. In the case of Vollie, he will never shake the desire to become no one.

We know a person by the things she can’t help repeating.

Paul Simon, “American Tune”

More than three centuries after the love song became a hymn and then a chorale in the St. Matthew Passion, Paul Simon took the melody and turned it into something else again. I think this song feels more utterly new because it is so old. The lyric of “American Tune” is about dashed hopes and rueful consolation.

I find the tenderness of this recording irresistible. Simon’s music, especially from the late 1960s and ’70s, is so free of cynicism that it always feels like a challenge to me, to wear no defenses, to hide nothing.

Vladimir Horowitz, “Kinderszenen, Op. 15, by Robert Schumann: 11. Fürchtenmachen”

This strange interruption (Hobgoblin) is the only place in the Kinderszenen where Schumann uses the marking “Schneller” (faster). Vollie’s father dislikes it for this reason, and Vollie avoids playing it until an impulsive and fateful turn halfway through the book.

Hélène Grimaud, “Suite Bergamesque, by Claude Debussy: 3. Claire de Lune”

I took a detour in the middle of this novel to work on another book, part of which is here, the story of a woman who has never played piano before the age of twenty-four and who, hearing this piece (Moonlight), is gripped by the determination to master the instrument. (It turns out she’s pretty good!) The story is about the necessity and folly of effort.

I’ve learned from piano that you have to try, but if you push you will fail. The same is true of love as the characters in The Volunteer experience it. A piano teacher once told me the most important word in English is “let.”

Jerusalem Trio, “Piano Trio No. 1 in B Major, by Johannes Brahms: I. Allegro”

Brahms wrote of Bach’s Chaccone, “If I imagined that I could have created, even conceived the piece, I am quite certain that the excess of excitement and earth-shattering experience would have driven me out of my mind.”

The first movement of this trio by Brahms, makes me so excited I want to shout. I imagine a short novel based on it. Maybe 180 pages. Something crammed with jubilation, the story of a love affair or a baseball season.

Vadim Gluzman and Angela Yoffe, “Spiegel im Spiegel, by Arvo Pärt”

The mathematical clarity of this piece (Mirror in Mirror), written by the Latvian composer Arvo Pärt in 1978, is so plain that it seems discovered, not written. As though a piece of music could be true. It evokes an unbounded intuition, like the space exposed when a mirror faces another mirror.

What if we could speak of certain emotions as true, the way a mathematical theorem is true? My mind wants somehow to assent to the feeling “Spiegel im Spiegel” gives me. The paradox here is analogous to the one Marilynne Robinson describes in an essay: “Good fiction is not false. It is a complex and figurative statement of an intuition of truth.”

Vladimir Horowitz, “Kinderszenen, Op. 15, by Robert Schumann: 13. Der Dichter spricht”

The last of the Kinderszenen, (The Poet Speaks) a backward look at a time of security within turbulence: a parent is protecting you from the snow.


Salvatore Scibona and The Volunteer links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Booklist review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review

New Yorker interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Andrew Ridker's Playlist for His Novel "The Altruists"

The Altruists

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Andrew Ridker's debut novel The Altruists is a family drama both ambitious and intimate.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Beautifully written, with witty, pitch-perfect dialogue and fascinating characters, Ridker’s impressive, deeply satisfying debut is an extraordinarily insightful look at a family broken apart by loss and struggling to find a way back to each other and themselves."


In his own words, here is Andrew Ridker's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel The Altruists:



Before reading and writing consumed my life, I was what you might call a “music person.” I even had a short-lived career as a DJ in high school, which culminated in my aiding and abetting a girl in the temporary theft of her parents’ sound system. They—her parents—were having sex when we “broke in”; I’m not sure either of us ever recovered.

The following songs all relate in one way or another to my debut novel, The Altruists. The novel tracks the Alter family—Arthur, Francine, Ethan, and Maggie—over decades and across continents, from Paris to St. Louis to Zimbabwe, as they struggle with money, morality, and each other.

“News” – tUnE-yArDs

In my imaginary film adaptation of The Altruists, “News” plays over the opening credits. I imagine the lyrics as a warning shot to Arthur, the family patriarch: I’ve got news for you, baby / I’m not going to stick around here anymore / if you treat me badly.

“Fuck Up Some Commas” – Future

Early in the novel, Arthur’s daughter Maggie hears a song at a party that she can’t quite identify. Later on, she hears it again, noting the artist’s “promethazine-and-Sprite-soaked voice.” That artist, of course, is Future. “Fuck Up Some Commas” was released in March of 2015, just when the novel’s present action begins. To date I can think of no better euphemism for spending money. The Altruists, which centers around money—who has it, who doesn’t, what lengths people go to get it—might as well have been subtitled, The Alter Family Fucks Up Some Commas.

“Where You’ll Find Me Now” – Neutral Milk Hotel

It’s easy for me to picture Ethan, cloistered in his Carroll Gardens apartment, getting drunk and listening to Neutral Milk Hotel on a very expensive sound system. Ethan would have been about twelve years old when this album came out, and he strikes me as the kind of guy who drags his angsty teen listening with him into adulthood. I know I did.

“Stoned and Starving” – Parquet Courts

I began The Altruists while living in Ridgewood, Queens, in an apartment that overlooked a giant pit, just as Maggie does in the novel. I’m a fan of Parquet Courts, and really anything A. Savage is involved in, but this track makes the playlist for its lyrics, which mirror Maggie’s situation almost too perfectly: I was walking through Ridgewood, Queens / I was flipping through magazines / I was so, so stoned and starving.

“Across the Great Divide” – The Band

All white dads love The Band, and I think Arthur would relate to this song’s blend of longing and (naïve) optimism. “Across the Great Divide” is a song about the American Dream, about seeking your fortune in the west—or in Arthur’s case, the Midwest. I can hear him humming it while writing letters to his semi-estranged children from the other side of that great divide.

“Mwana Wamambo” – John Chibadura & Sungura Boys

Sungura is a popular style of music in Zimbabwe. This cheerful track would have been released just around the time Arthur visits the country, and I can see it playing in the background during his early days there—before things go terribly, terribly wrong.

“Sally Can’t Dance” – Lou Reed

The soundtrack to Francine’s semester abroad in Paris circa 1974. She’d probably want to be Sally, carefree and worldly, falling down on the dancefloor instead of writing a thesis about phenomenology. That chapter also contains a reference to “Johnny B. Goode,” in tribute to the great Chuck Berry, who used to have a standing engagement at Blueberry Hill, a bar in St. Louis not too far from the Alter family home.

“Swan Lake” – Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

The creeping oboe that kicks off Tchaikovsky’s opera gets a shout-out in the novel, when Arthur, in a misguided attempt to relate to Ethan, takes him to a regional production of Swan Lake.

“Jack U Off” – Prince

While Arthur is in Zimbabwe, Francine takes in a roommate from her home state of Ohio named Marla Bloch. Marla is a bit mischievous, and ends up throws a “Freudian ‘Slip’ Party” for their psych student cohort. Lingerie/underwear only. Prince’s deliciously single-entendre “Jack U Off” is the song of the night.

“You Can’t Always Get What You Want” – The Rolling Stones

The ultimate Baby Boomer hymn to disappointment and disillusionment. In a novel about thwarted desire, that hook—You can’t always get what you want / but if you try sometimes, you’ll find / you get what you need—seems entirely appropriate. I read recently that Trump used the song on the campaign trail. I’m not sure he’s ever heard the lyrics.


Andrew Ridker and The Altruists links:

the author's website

Booklist review
Kirkus review
New Yorker review
Publishers Weekly review

St. Louis magazine profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Nickolas Butler's Playlist for His Novel "Little Faith"

Little Faith

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Nickolas Butler's Little Faith is a moving novel that explores faith and loss.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Breathtaking yet devastating.... Butler weaves questions surrounding faith, regret, and whether it’s possible to love unconditionally into every page of this potent book.... This is storytelling at its finest."


In his own words, here is Nickolas Butler's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Little Faith:



The Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin is a magical place and I live on the very cusp of that magic amidst the northernmost ridges of that ancient country. This part of the world was mostly steamrolled by glaciers, everything flattened: Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Iowa, Michigan… But for some reason, The Driftless Area was spared and so, the landscape is all abrupt valleys, ridges, coulees, draws, cool and dark trout streams, and the dramatic Mississippi River Valley. It is a place of mystical bookstores housed in old tobacco warehouses, hippie co-ops, artistic small towns, great music, rushing trains, and abundant nature. It is also the setting for my most recent novel.

When I began imagining the world of Little Faith, I wanted everything in the book to be old and smooth. I wanted you to feel the atmosphere of the book like you were rubbing a river-stone in your pocket. I wanted the characters to be old and familiar, like grandparents – that feeling you get from being around a person who has lived a good long life - that comfort. And I wanted the setting to feel that way, too. Modest comfortable houses, old pickup trucks, ancient rivers, tired clothing, century-old churches, winding, curvy country roads…

Many of these songs are sprinkled throughout Little Faith providing a kind of soundtrack for the novel. One of the characters might reference a song, or hear a piece of some lyrics. I’ve always thought it was important for a reader to hear what they were reading: how a room sounds, what music is playing inside a tavern, how sounds moves inside the amphitheater of an abandoned quarry or inside a derelict movie theater.

I hope you enjoy this playlist.

Forward,

Nickolas Butler
Cleghorn, Wisconsin
January 15th, 2019


My Sweet Lord – George Harrison

There’s a reason George Harrison’s All Things Must Pass on vinyl sells for upwards of $50 ($20 or more, used.) The album is a masterpiece, marked by this single which is so much more than its pleadingly earnest title. My family always chastises me when I throw this song on our turntable, but to me it’s such an ecstatic, honest, searching song. And Harrison is my favorite Beatle.

White Winter Hymnal – Fleet Foxes

For me, Fleet Foxes can do no wrong. They remind me of driving through rural Pennsylvania with my father as a very small child and listening to Crosby, Still, Nash, & Young. In a world full of so much discord, I find great relief in the harmony of this music.

Midnight Cowboy – Faith No More

If you were going to construct a soundtrack of what my teenage years sounded like, circa 1995-1998, there would be a whole lot of Faith No More playing. And when I was at my most broody, my most angsty, sulking self, this song was a favorite. But of course it is a timeless movie theme that reminds us of friendship and of hard-times, too.

Comfort Me – Feist

Feist is my hero. Come back to Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Feist – please.

After Midnight – JJ Cale

My favorite song for hot nights in Wisconsin, drinking cheap, cold American macro-brews. You listen to JJ Cale and you hear the soundtrack of small-town Wisconsin bars. Enter through a screened-in door, hear the billiards balls pop, the murmuring of voices, the TV on low broadcasting a meaningless baseball game, the neons humming…

The Heart of Saturday Night – Tom Waits

American culture these days celebrates the city and portrays almost every small town as a backward place with dark, horrible secrets… But it wasn’t always that way. Tom Waits is a good example. Growing up listening to Waits made me feel proud to be from a small place in Wisconsin. He is the kind of American poet who celebrated everywhere, and I’ve always felt close to his music.

Today – Jefferson Airplane

A friend of mine reminded me of this song which is so heartbreaking and beautiful. Another friend pointed out that Jefferson Airplane’s Surrealistic Pillow was the artistic achievement all other rock bands at the time were reaching for.

Can’t Find My Way Home – Steve Winwood

A friend posted a YouTube video of Winwood playing this song solo, beside a crackling fireplace. I’ve been hooked ever since. Winwood was a near constant background voice for me in the 1980s, but I love his early stuff even more, of course. Teamed with Clapton and Ginger Baker among others, Winwood is a kind of rock-god.

Sweet Thing – Van Morrison

I listened to this song on repeat for many, many sessions while writing Little Faith. It is a difficult thing to achieve – how to make a piece of art that displays the wonder of youth, with the ache and weight of time and perspective. Sweet Thing melds the two perfectly.

Pass in Time – Beth Orton

Beth Orton’s Central Reservation is one of my Top-Ten-Desert-Island albums. And this song is the coup-de-grace.


Nickolas Butler and Little Faith links:

the author's website

Kirkus review
Library Journal review
Minneapolis Star Tribune review
Publishers Weekly review

KMUW interview with the author
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel profile of the author
Volume One interview with the author
WUWM interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Katie Peterson's Playlist for Her Poetry Collection "A Piece of Good News"

A Piece of Good News

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Katie Peterson's A Piece of Good News is an evocative and often startling poetry collection.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"In the fourth collection from Peterson, a typical poem moves by visceral detail rather than by association or logic, with many spectacular arrivals that overwhelm the journey."


In her own words, here is Katie Peterson's Book Notes music playlist for her poetry collection A Piece of Good News:



I wrote a book called A Piece of Good News during a time in which there wasn’t much. The world’s brutal, late in the second decade of the third millennium. The imagination has to stay on its toes with all the imagining it has to do – polar ice caps melting? Children put in cages by your government. A poem is a series of dares to the imagination –it makes you see one thing, then tries to make you see something more difficult, then maybe it tries to make you see something you’ve never seen. It can fool you into your own attentiveness using beauty or music. If the imagination is a kind of muscle, it’s strengthened by the moves a poem asks us to make. The belief of the poem is that we survive by attention, not by avoidance. I can’t remember where I heard the statistic about the human person only being able to think of loss for ninety seconds without suppling an explanation or a narrative, but I think about that a lot.

My last book, The Accounts, was an elegy for my mother, whose death in 2008 coincided with the financial crash and the election of Barack Obama, on whom she had a kind of civic crush the size of the national debt. What did my loss mean in relation to a world’s events that dwarfed it, that dwarf it still? And yet, I still think that poetry, the voice welling up from the body in whatever form that takes, whether it becomes public, whether it grows larger as it gets repeated by strangers, whether it takes on new meanings in the marketplace, begins small, with that one life we clutch to ourselves like a baby, or more like a passport, like a fistful of cash or a plane ticket. The hope is that everything from the personal, from the world of that one life, will interrupt the social world like the memory of a dream interrupts an ordinary day, and that all that was lived and material by the poet will live as a dream in the mind of a stranger. I go to work in the morning examining my own life by writing down my dreams – a series of emblems, images, fragments. And then what actually happens starts to seem more like those fragments as the day goes on.

A Piece of Good News is about living in the aftermath of the destruction of a world. By “destruction of a world,” I mean my world, but the poems mean the world, the whole damn thing. Such is the arrogance and grace of poetry, to make you believe the two are one. What we know about our current apocalypse is that it keeps going; what I know about my dead is that they keep living in their dying. The book makes an argument in its bones that our fear of the dead makes our lives harder; that our fear of the past makes our present more difficult. I was one person mourning while I wrote it – about my mother, about a lover, about a baby that didn’t live, about a world – but I was also an empty body that experiences traveled through, an empty house that the wind blew through, a space in which a new world kept bringing its constant arrivals, its perishable pleasures, its names and faces and places.

Which brings us to music. When I think of music, I think of movement – when I think of the time of this book, I think of driving in my green Honda Civic across the country and back. The book hurtles between California and Massachusetts, and when I left Massachusetts for good in 2014, I sold the car to my apartment’s super for a song. There are two kinds of actual song on this playlist, and I suppose for me, as Eliot said of Dante and Shakespeare, they divide the world between them. The first are folky ballads laced with sentimentality and irony by people we tend to call singer-songwriters, Dylan and his gang. In these songs, the prettiest view is the rearview mirror and it gets prettier the farther away it gets. But it’s the formal structure of the songs I like so much, the way that first person “I” of the traveler is such an empty container, so ready to be inhabited by the sights and sounds of the road. I love American landscape poems, from Whitman to Jeffers to Hughes – Dickinson’s even got a few, like “My Life had Stood – a Loaded Gun.” These songs are like those landscape poems. The second are gospel songs. Once, when something awful happened to me, nothing could touch it but gospel music, and it’s all I listened to for a good many months. I bought a bunch of messed up vinyls that still played and played them again and again. I love the way the images repeat, the lines repeat – and the way different singers inhabit the songs differently. Gospel music is a kind of metaphysical poetry – think Herbert and Donne and nowadays, Carl Phillips – it’s aesthetically complex, it both repeats and tries to surprise, it takes conventional material and turns it on its head. Or maybe metaphysical poetry, at its best, is a kind of gospel music— I could see someone singing “Batter my heart, three personned God,” in front of a choir. I love gospel music for its happy-sad quality. Mourning can’t let grief have the last word, not because one refuses sorrow, but because life has to keep on, or it doesn’t have to, it just seems to, and us, however changed, with it. And there are a few who sit a little in-between. Here’s some music to drive this book to.

“Freight Train,” Elizabeth Cotten

Heaviness meets lightness. Her voice is buoyed by the thought of the train, not weighed down. I moved a lot as I wrote A Piece of Good News and there were years when I had to find a home in movement. Cotten’s song says, let me always know what it means to move, even after I die. The story goes that she wrote it looking at the mountains thinking of the train passing through when she was a teenager in North Carolina (she later became Pete Seeger’s nanny), and the persistent ease of the rhythm puts me in the mind of my own landscape-gazing, looking not just at what was there, but at what wasn’t there yet, and at what had gone away.

“Up to Me,” Bob Dylan

Cotten’s song is like a field. Sometimes the past feels more like a junk store. This song’s full of fragments, one night stands, clever but cheap one liners, and dead end jobs. Dylan keeps saying, “I guess it must be up to me,” but he’s barely keeping it together, how can anything be up to this guy? This song’s a great example of that first person, seemingly intact, smashed to smithereens by the things that pass through its consciousness. There’s a set of poems in the book (“Autobiographical Fragment,” “The Economy,” “An Offering,” “The Government,” and a few others) in which lines from Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount are recharged with doubt and confusion, and Dylan’s lines remind me of these: “Now we heard the sermon on the mount and I knew it was too complex / It didn’t amount to anything more than what the broken glass reflects.”

“Will the Circle Be Unbroken,” The Staple Singers

This gorgeous version of this song has something to do with slowing the pace of the grieving to keep the ones we’ve lost alive. I love these lines and the way the Staple Singers sing them: “I said to that undertaker / Undertaker please drive slow /For this lady that you’re hauling / Lord, I hate to see here go.” Harmony’s dignity here. “Honeymoon Suite,” a poem in the book, talks of finding “a version of slowness / for the soul / accustomed to hurry.” I think a poem can do that.

“My Sweet Lord,” George Harrison

This song is more sound than words, and it’s more about the guitar than about the lyrics. The lyrics are famous for translating a Christian god into a Hindu one but they’re really both doing what the guitar tells them to do. There’s a poem in the book, “Echo Before the Echo” which is a story-poem, but the melody behind it would go something like this, a spinning, twisting longing that’s actually kind of engineered.

“Didn’t it Rain,” Sister Rosetta Tharpe

A kind of narrative’s hidden inside the beautiful music here too – a story retold, brought up to the present moment. In gospel music, the good news stays news, it keeps surprising, the delight’s not in the originality of the story but in the reanimation of the details. There’s a lot in this book that doesn’t even try to be new – there’s a lot of biblical allusion, for example. But subject matter’s just an occasion for music. Just look at the video – Sister Rosetta’s ready to sing all night.

“Who Knows Where The Time Goes,” Sandy Denny

She’s trying to figure out what’s timeless and as she does, time goes away. Come to think of it, a lot of these songs have to do with trying to re-align yourself in time and space. The book begins with a scene from Plato’s last dialogue – the epigraph to the book, that is. When Socrates’ student Crito asks him what they’ll all do when Socrates is dead, Socrates says that they have to live in the tracks of what they had said on previous occasions. As if that makes it any easier.

“Saratoga Summer Song,” Katie & Anna McGarrigle

I’m ashamed of how much happiness is in this book. I love all the hungers in this song, especially in these lines – “And all that sun brought dope and lust / We weren’t too smart; we had a bust / But nobody slept alone.” Gifts of the summer that get consumed – the gift of the poem, that it must be given away.

“California,” Joni Mitchell

Must I explain that the pleasure of being on the way back to California rivals the pleasure of arrival?

“How I Got Over,” Mahalia Jackson

She sings words like they were written in letters of fire. She turns words into something other than words – and these are the same words you and I use to talk! She describes a relief that feels like running after crisis has been averted – but I think it’s the continuation of the crisis that made the miracle necessary. Grief doesn’t get “solved.” But you can find a form, a rhythm, a song.

“If I Needed You,” Townes Van Zandt

A few weeks before my daughter was born, I hired a former student to put together some furniture in the downstairs room, an inordinately complicated guest bed from Ikea. A little while after he started I heard Townes singing this song, and I shouted down, “are you playing Townes,” and we shouted between the rooms for a while. Born in the Maldives, this fellow was working his way through the rest of his education as a farmhand, and after his family been forced off their land (which they’d lived on for hundreds of years) into the city, his father played Townes every day. You don’t need to say much if you love Townes, just that you do, but it got us going with each other, which helped a difficult day along. A lot of his songs are sad, turning and turning in a kind of hallucinatory grief at circumstances, the grief of hard luck and homelessness, the grief of the addict and the loser and the loner. But this one’s happy, even if it’s hypothetical, a hallucinatory dream of love rather than the grief, and in that dream, the lover and the beloved spin in constant motion towards each other, and desire and healing are one.

“Before Believing,” Emmylou Harris

This feels like a little song, just a tune, but it gives Harris’ Pieces of the Sky its title but not in a refrain, just somewhere in the middle (the title of my book isn’t anywhere in the book). It feels like a heart to heart confession, the moment when two people talking together can have as much solitude as one. I guess I’m still partial to poems that live in a secret and solitary place like that, that never tell all their secrets.

“Amazing Grace,” Aretha Franklin

It’s an aria. It’s perfect. It’s a world. It’s everything. In “Music 1980” I tell a story about what music meant to someone I loved and how I knew – I knew wordlessly, and the word I gave to that wordlessness is “astonishment” which is the same word I send as tribute across the river between the living and the dead to the Queen.

“Coat of Many Colors,” Dolly Parton

Now in some way I’ve got no business attaching myself to this song – we never hurt for coats in my family. But the buoyancy of the music invigorates not just the lesson (love’s more important than things) but the trouble at the heart of the lesson (the values of the world are all misaligned). She’s thinking all the way through this song – she’s turning the terms around in her head, looking for a way out, she’s defending and arguing and standing up and delighting in all that. The way out is the coat, not the argument, the love, not the moralizing.

“Beat the Retreat,” Richard and Linda Thompson

Sufi-seduced Richard and Linda Thompson in their married incarnation trying to win a competition for delayed gratification – it’s not the longest song here (Aretha’s got that) but it’s one of the longest feeling songs I know. It opens and closes its verses and refrains more times than I can count with guitar that feels more like percussion. But it’s on its way, strutting its awkward archaisms as a kind of tribute to the rituals love sometimes forces us to take part in.

“Love and Affection,” Joan Armatrading

If you could relax into hope it would feel like this.

“Go On Ahead and Go Home,” Iris DeMent

I wanted the last line of the book, which I’m not going to reveal here, to be like a blues song. The blues doesn’t let sadness have the last word. Either does this revival song by Iris DeMent that ends “everything is alright.” But what a road. It doesn’t matter whether everything that happens, happens for a reason and it sure as hell doesn’t matter if you find the right reason. What matters is that you got somewhere. Though it seems like it’s time to move on already, isn’t it?


Katie Peterson and A Piece of Good News links:

excerpt from the book

Publishers Weekly review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (An Excerpt from Helen Oyeyemi's New Novel, A New Song from the National, and more)

Helen Oyeyemi

BuzzFeed shared an excerpt from Helen Oyeyemi's new novel Gingerbread.


Stream a new song by the National.


March's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

Mary Queen of Scots by Antonia Fraser

eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

Strange Weather by Joe Hill


Stream a new song by L7.


BuzzFeed shared an excerpt from Mitchell S. Jackson's memoir Survival Math.


Stream a new song by Strand of Oaks.


Vulture, TIME, Big Other, and Town & Country recommended March's best new books.


Stream a new Illuminati Hotties song.


The Paris Review interviewed author Halle Butler.


Stream a new song by Shovels and Rope.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn shared an excerpt from Jordan A. Rothacker’s new collection Gristle.


Stream a new song by Pip Blom.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 5, 2019

Shorties (March's Best Books, The 10th Anniversary of the Antlers' Hospice Album, and more)

Hospice

Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Millions, and Literary Hub recommended March's best new books.


The Antlers' Peter Silberman reconsidered the band's Hospice album o its 10th anniversary at The A. V. Club.


March's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

Your Duck Is My Duck by Deborah Eisenberg


Women writers recommended books for Women's History Month at Vulture.


Stream a new song by Dehd.


Deadline shared an excerpt from the graphic novel adaptation of Margaret Atwood's novel The Handmaid's Tale.


Stream a new song by the Hold Steady.


The longlist for the 2019 Women's Prize for Fiction has been announced.


Paste recapped February's best books.


The Creative Independent interviewed author Kevin Killian.


All Songs Considered recapped February's best albums.


Marina Benjamin recommended books with unstable narrators at Electric Literature.


Stream a a new Mountain Goats song.


Yiyun Li discussed her story in this week's issue with the New Yorker.


Aquarium Drunkard shared a playlist of covers of Richard Thompson songs.


Electric Literature interviewed Esmé Weijun Wang about her essay collection, The Collected Schizophrenias.


The Paris Review shared an excerpt from Will Ashon's book, Chamber Music: Wu-Tang and America.


The Guardian examined why New York City is losing bookstores.


Noisey and Rolling Stone interviewed singer-songwriter Jenny Lewis.


George Saunders discussed his New Yorker stories with Electric Literature.


Movie Hustle listed the best music blogs of 2019.


The Millions recommended March's must-read poetry collections.


NPR Music shared a mixtape pf SXSW artists.


Author T Kira Madden talked food with Grub Street.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed musician and author Saul Williams.


Portland Monthly interviewed author Mitchell S. Jackson.


Pete Townshend's multimedia "rock novel." The Age Of Anxiety, will be published this fall.


Book Riot recommended must-read LGBTQ novels.


Literary Hub interviewed author Helen Oyeyemi.


BOMB interviewed author Mark Doten.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 4, 2019

Shorties (Helen Oyeyemi on Her New Novel, New Coathangers Music, and more)

Gingerbread

Helen Oyeyemi discussed her new novel, Gingerbread, with the Guardian.


Noisey shared a new Coathangers' song and interviewed the band's frontwoman.


March's best eBook deals.


Jenny Lewis discussed her forthcoming album, On the Line, with The Current's podcast.


Sandra Newman discussed her new novel, The Heavens, with Weekend Edition.


Paste previewed March's best new albums.


BuzzFeed shared an excerpt from T Kira Madden's memoir, Long Live the Tribe of Fatherless Girls.


Aurora visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Etaf Rum discussed her new novel, A Woman Is No Man, with Morning Edition.


All Songs Considered shared a playlist of February's best foods.


Vulture listed the best books of 2019 (so far).


Ars Technica examined why vinyl records have held their appeal in a digital age.


Refinery29 previewed March's best books.


Stream a new song by She Keeps Bees.


Paste recapped February's best books.


Stream a new Sebadoh song.


Nina Kruscheva's recommended books to help understand the world at The Week.


The Bird and the Bee covered Van Halen's "Panama."


Bookworm interviewed Dennis Cooper and Zac Farley.


Hanif Abdurraquib discussed his book, Go Ahead in the Rain: Notes to A Tribe Called Quest, with BOMB.


The Guardian interviewed author Siri Hustvedt.


Noisey remembered Talk Talk's Mark Hollis.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed poet Dorothea Lasky.


Pitchfork interviewed Weyes Blood's Natalie Mering.


TIME profiled author Meg Wolitzer.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author J.S. Breukelaar.


LitReactor recommended Black Caribbean authors.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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