January 13, 2017

Book Notes - Laurie Blauner "The Solace of Monsters"

The Solace of Monsters

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Laurie Blauner's novel The Solace of Monsters is an innovative modern interpretation of Frankenstein.

Helen Phillips wrote of the book:

"The Solace of Monsters is courageous and innovative and mesmerizing, Frankenstein for a new age. Laurie Blauner never shies away from the grotesque, or from the beautiful."


In her own words, here is Laurie Blauner's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Solace of Monsters:



My new novel, The Solace of Monsters, is about the adventures of Mara, a young woman, and the fifth version of a daughter created by her scientist father from other body parts. It's an updated Frankenstein story as seen through Mara's eyes. Memory and dreams play a large part in her story. And there is always the question as to whether pieces come together as a whole or does the whole disassemble into its parts? My musical interests include all kinds of music. I don't listen to music when I write but sometimes it is a reward after writing well. A playlist that evokes my book in some way includes:

1) Leonard Cohen - if I need to pick a particular song "Suzanne" whose lyrics, "And you want to travel with her, and you want to travel blind/ And you know that she will trust you/ For you've touched her perfect body with your mind." Which is about caring, communication, and traveling but it's the way his music and lyrics move, undulating like a river. It also brings up mind versus body themes, i.e., what is a perfect body? What is a perfect mind? How do emotions affect these? A journey reminds me of Mara. But it is his growling, deep voice that, somehow reminds me of Mara's voice and her grinding laugh.

2) Pink Martini - "Let's Never Stop Falling in Love" only because Mara falls in love with the world. And I enjoy the way Pink Martini take diverse and a variety of classical songs and do them in their own fashion because I never like writing the same book twice. I want to write something different every time but in my own way like Pink Martini.

3) Adele - Yes, she encompasses everything for everyone, sadness, joy, contemplation, declaration, life. "Turning Tables" with its lyrics "I can't keep up with your turning tables/under your thumb I can't breathe." This describes Mara's relationship with her father and the difficulty of loving and hating someone.

4) from Wicked - the song "Defying Gravity" because "Something has changed within me/It's time to trust my instincts/I think I'll trying defying gravity." With the wizard as a father figure, this is also true of Mara's story and her need to seek out the world and see what's in it. It's also true for anyone changing anything.

5) Camille Saint-Saens - "Danse Macabre" because I take ballet classes at an older age, which is insane. This song is a bit creepy, haunting, lively, and lovely at the same time (which describes my book) and also makes me want to dance to it. Instead, I imagine all the Maras dancing excitedly at the same time to this song.


Laurie Blauner and The Solace of Monsters links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Kirkus review

Necessary Fiction essay by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us





January 13, 2017

Shorties (The Tournament of Books Shortlist, Slowdive's First New Song in 22 Years, and more)

The shortlist and judges for this year's Tournament of Books has been announced.


Stream Slowdive's first new song in 22 years.


35 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Tuesday (bringing the total number to 1,624), including Forbes' best books on birds and birding and The Oklahoman's best graphic novels.

Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting "best of 2016" music lists


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Hannah Arendt: A Life in Dark Times by Anne C. Heller
A Model World by Michael Chabon


Stream a new Wolf Eyes song.


GQ interviewed Marlon James about the fantasy trilogy he is writing.


Phantogram covered Radiohead's "Weird Fishes/Arpeggi."


Signature recommended books by and about Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald.


Stream a new Allison Crutchfield song.


The New Yorker profiled author Ayelet Waldman.


Stream a new GEMS song.


Bustle recommended 2017 books by Indian authors.


Kevin Devine covered Elliott Smith, Pinegrove, and Leonard Cohen.


The Millions interviewed author Leland Cheuk.


NPR Music is accepting entries for its 2017 Tiny Desk Concert contest.


Bookworm interviewed author Lynne Tillman.


Drowned in Sound reconsidered Slint's Spiderland album.


Electric Literature looked back on Barack Obama's literary moments as president.


Garden & Gun shared two new Son Volt songs and interviewed Jay Farrar.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

January 12, 2017

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - December 1, 2017

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


We Told You So: Comics As Art

We Told You So: Comics As Art
by Michael Dean and Tom Spurgeon

Congratulations to our pals at Fantagraphics on reaching the 40 year milestone! The legendary comics publisher was founded in 1976 by a bright, young group of men and women with the belief that comics could be art. Four decades later, comic books are reviewed positively in literary publications and are held in similar esteem to their prose counterparts, a striking resurgence of a medium that was once all but discredited. We Told You So is the oral history of a true trailblazer, and traces the lineage of modern comics through interviews with over 200 cartoonists (including Robert Crumb and Daniel Clowes), editors, critics, and more.


Difficult Women

Difficult Women
by Roxane Gay

Acclaimed essayist, powerhouse talent, and twitter icon Roxane Gay has delivered on the hype once again. Difficult Women collects previously published stories, and with them it collects evidence that Gay’s writing deserves the superlatives. Her remarkable language feels raw as an exposed tooth root, and as the reader burrows through these thematically linked stories, one finds that the harshness of the subject matter (violence, rape, desperation, etc.) is negated by Gay’s engrossing prose. There is particular care in depicting the body, in experiencing the world through the body, which adds a clarity, an immediacy.


Kubrick Red: A Memoir

Kubrick Red: A Memoir
by Simon Roy, translated by. Jacob Homel

Simon Roy teaches literature at Collège Lionel-Giroux, and has seen Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining over forty times. Translated from the original French by Jacob Homel, Kubrick Red is a difficult book to describe, but, as Kubrick himself pointed out in 1995, what good book isn’t? Simon Roy’s novel fuses film theory, thriller, and reflections on his troubled childhood to create an unsettling and often brilliant debut.


Homesick For Another World: Stories

Homesick For Another World: Stories
by Ottessa Moshfegh

A regular in the likes of The Paris Review and The New Yorker, Ottessa Moshfegh’s fiction is incredibly alluring. The unsentimental depravity from her acclaimed novel Eileen is kicked up a notch in this collection of short stories. Do not let the exterior fool you, these are not tales of sci-fi fantasy, these are stories of the down-and-out dancing in the ditch with two left feet. Her stories are often brutal and outrageous, but Moshfegh truly excels when she works in moments of tenderness and compassion; hers is a craft of startling emotional complexity.


Blood of the Dawn

Blood of the Dawn
by Claudia Salazar Jiménez, translated by Elizabeth Bryer

Claudia Salazar Jiménez, professor and founder of literary journal Fuegos de Arena, is one of the most recognized Peruvian writers of her generation, and is now available to English readers through the translation of her stunning debut. Blood of the Dawn is teeth-bared tale of three women’s lives during the “time of fear” in Peru, when the Shining Path rebel insurgency was at its peak. This incendiary novel manages to pair an honest look at a social and national trauma with an intimate portrayal of the personal tragedies within.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Paul Auster on Books And Reading, A List of the Best Punk Albums of the 2000s, and more)

Paul Auster discussed books and reading with the New York Times.


Paste listed the best punk albums of the 2000s.


35 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Tuesday (bringing the total number to 1,624), including Forbes' best books on birds and birding and The Oklahoman's best graphic novels.

Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting "best of 2016" music lists


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Hannah Arendt: A Life in Dark Times by Anne C. Heller
A Model World by Michael Chabon


Beach Slang covered the Adverts' "Bored Teenagers."


Anna Pitoniak discussed her debut novel The Futures with Flavorwire.


Aquarium Drunkard shared a compilation of outsider psych music from the '60s and '70s.


Literary Hub interviewed author Samanta Schweblin.


Stream a new Grails track.


Stream a new Minus the Bear song.


The Rumpus interviewed poet Dawn Lundy Martin.


Stream a new Tall Tall Trees song.


Literary Hub previewed 2017's best indie press books.


The Allegedly NYC podcast interviewed ANOHNI.


The Creative Independent interviewed author Lynne Tillman.


NPR Music is streaming Austra's Future Politics album.


Elle shared a short story from Roxane Gay's new collection Difficult Women.


CLRVYNT shared an excerpt from Finding Joseph I: An Oral History of H.R. From Bad Brains.


Electric Literature interviewed author Mary Miller.


Drowned in Sound interviewed PWR BTTM's Liv Bruce.


BuzzFeed, The Week UK, Cultured Vultures, and The A.V. Club recommended 2017's best new books.


Stream a new song by Pavement's Spiral Stairs.


IGN listed the most anticipated comics of 2017.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Anton Newcombe of the Brian Jonestown Massacre.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

January 11, 2017

Book Notes - Joshua Mohr "Sirens"

Sirens

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Joshua Mohr's memoir Sirens is a fascinating account of recovery, writing, and love.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"By turns raw and tender, this book not only chronicles a man's literary coming-of-age. It also celebrates the power of love while offering an uncensored look at the frailties that can define—and sometimes overwhelm—people and their lives. An entirely candid, compelling memoir of addiction and the long, fraught road of recovery."


In his own words, here is Joshua Mohr's Book Notes music playlist for his memoir Sirens:



Music is always a huge part of my writing process, as is coffee—so much coffee!—but with my new memoir, music played a more intimate role: It supplied the book's biorhythm.

In my novels, I use music to channel certain characters, maybe listening to PJ Harvey exclusively, while I'm writing a ferocious/cerebral woman, etc, but with the memoir, I tried to use music as a literal soundtrack.

What the hell does that mean? A literal soundtrack? That's a good question. I'm glad you're paying attention.

A literal soundtrack means that not only was music playing while I wrote the source material, but I revised this memoir compulsively out loud, reading it like 100 times to myself to dial in the book's time signature, its unique sound, and while I read aloud I always had music playing. So when I'm reading a chapter maniacally, pacing and ranting, scaring my neighbors, super disgusting and lovely punk rock blared to help me lock in and keep the proper sonic assignments for certain scenes.

Here's a selection of tracks that played huge roles in that aural intermingling of music and my out loud rantings.

Kim Gordon – "Murdered Out"
7 Year Bitch – "Hip Like Junk"
Bad Brains – "The Regulator"
Operation Ivy – "Knowledge"
Parquet Courts – "Stoned and Starving"
Karen O – "Native Korean Rock"
The Cramps - "Garbageman"
The Kills – "Weedkiller"
Savages – "I am Here"
Fang – "Invitation"

Go ahead and find these songs on YouTube or Spotify. Turn ‘em up loud—and I mean loud—and try to read to it. It will feel weird at first, but don't stop. You might go hoarse. You might find yourself fighting with it a bit, and that's a good thing! They are screaming and you are screaming and after a few minutes, your different kinds of music will dilute.


Joshua Mohr and Sirens links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Kirkus review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Damascus
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Fight Song
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Some Things That Meant the World to Me
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Termite Parade
LitReactor interview with the author
Los Angeles Review of Books interview with the author
Rare Bird Radio interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Marlon James' New Fantasy Trilogy, Roxane Gay Interviewed Madonna, and more)

Marlon James is writing a fantasy trilogy.


Roxane Gay interviewed Madonna at Harper's Bazaar.


35 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Sunday (bringing the total number to 1,624), including Forbes best books on birds and birding and The Oklahoman's best graphic novels.

Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting "best of 2016" music lists


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Hannah Arendt: A Life in Dark Times by Anne C. Heller
A Model World by Michael Chabon


Lambchop's Kurt Wagner discussed his favorite British albums at The Quietus.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed Joshua Mohr about his new memoir .


Stream a new track from Ariel Pink and Weyes Blood.


Rolling Stone listed David Bowie's most unforgettable onscreen moments.


Stream a new Cloud Nothings song.


J. David Osborne interviewed author Troy James Weaver.


Stream a new Temples song.


Read the writings of a young Jane Austen.


Stream a new Mark Eitzel song.


The Guardian previewed 2017's Brexit-inspired fiction.


Stream a new Karen Elson song.


Stream a 2009 BBC documentary on Neil Young.


Literary Hub recommended short novels.


David Byrne on his Joan of Arc musical.


Stream a new song by Laetitia Sadier Source Ensemble.


Huck Magazine interviewed Kim Gordon.


Junot Diaz discussed the works of Octavia Butler with Salon.


The Creative Independent interviewed musician Thor Harris.


Bustle listed the most anticipated feminist books of 2017.


Stream a new darkDark song that features Haley Bonar.


The Chicago Reader previewed 2017's best books.


Stream a new Laura Marling song.


All Things Considered interviewed Shanthi Sekaran about her novel Lucky Boy.


Stream a new Japandroids song.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

January 10, 2017

Book Notes - Madeleine Thien "Do Not Say We Have Nothing"

Do Not Say We Have Nothing

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Winner of the Giller Prize and a finalist for the Booker, Madeleine Thien's novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing is an ambitious and profound exploration of the lives of Chinese citizens and how the Cultural Revolution changed their (and their family's) lives.

The New York Times wrote of the book:

"A powerfully expansive novel…Thien writes with the mastery of a conductor who is as in command of the symphony’s tempo as she is attuned to the nuances of each individual instrument"


In her own words, here is Madeleine Thien's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Do Not Say We Have Nothing:



In 2011, I finished a a novel, Dogs at the Perimeter, which forever changed my thinking about why and how I write. Then novel takes place within, and in the aftermath of, the Cambodian civil war and genocide, and is about the destruction of society and self, first by a totalitarian regime and horrific brutality, and afterwards by one's own hands (the guilt and loneliness of survival, and violence against oneself). Writing the novel and, later, speaking about it in the world, was emotionally and physically exhausting. By the end, I was almost afraid of words. What they couldn't say, and what they hid.

I was overwhelmed, and for a long time, desperately sad. When the depression lifted, I turned to music, and in particular, one piece, J.S. Bach's Goldberg Variations.

Unexpectedly, this music opened for me another way of thinking about sound, silence, time, cadence, discipline, and freedom. I began to feel how, each time we listen deeply, each time we give ourselves over to a piece of music, it reconfigures something within us.

Eventually I wrote another novel, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, which circles between three musicians studying at the Shanghai Conservatory in the 1960s. The novel is a meditation and a journey through art and revolution, as well as artistic and revolutionary violence. In the novel, silence and sound are not binaries; rather they form part of a continuous, complex fabric of life, politics, music and self.

When and if we can, we speak (make music, write, engage, commit) and when we cannot, we listen. It was listening, not speaking, that saved me.


The Goldberg Variations, J.S. Bach, recorded by Glenn Gould in 1955 and 1981

These two recordings bookend Glenn Gould's career and life. The Goldberg Variations consists of an aria (which begins and ends the whole) and a set of 30 variations, built not on the melody of the aria, but on the notes of baseline. By the time we return to the beginning, we have traversed worlds. I listened to these recordings whenever I worked on Do Not Say We Have Nothing, and heard it at least 10,000 times.

Of the 15th variation, Glenn Gould wrote, "It's the most severe and rigorous and beautiful canon … the most severe and beautiful that I know, the canon in inversion at the fifth. It's a piece so moving, so anguished—and so uplifting at the same time—that it would not be in any way out of place in the St. Matthew's Passion."


Sonatas for Piano and Violin, J.S. Bach

Sometime before his 40th birthday, Bach began composing six sonatas for violin and harpsichord. Over the next 25 years, he returned to these six sonatas again and again; they would be the very last pieces of music he worked on before he died. The first instrument Bach studied was not the organ, but the violin. He was taught by his father, who passed away when Bach was twelve. In these sonatas, the two voices, piano and violin, seem to create space even as they speak their own desires. The act of creation was, for Bach, acts of counterpoint: necessary solitude and necessary contact; each to his or her own, each brought into focus by the other.


Sin Sisamuth and Ros Sereysothea, "Mou Pei Na"

Cambodian singers Sin Sisamuth and Ros Sereysothea were part of the country's brilliant psychedelic rock scene of the 1950s and 1960s. They carry us back to the Cambodia that was, and a Cambodia that still exists. Many of the original recordings were destroyed during the time of the Khmer Rouge and the genocide, but their music, preserved on copies of copies of cassettes and CDs and every possible format, can be heard everywhere in Cambodia today.


Dmitri Shostakovich, Symphony No. 5

In 1936, the Russian composer Dimitri Shostakovich, persecuted by authorities, chose to withdraw his Fourth Symphony. His brother-in-law, his sister and his mother-in-law had all been sent into exile or labour camps, and one by one his friends were disappearing. Shostakovich, according to biographer Laurel E. Fay, knew that his life was in peril.

When he returned with his Fifth Symphony, Shostakovich courageously put into the world a symphony that was necessarily public but also deeply private. Abstract, wordless, yet making use of a narrative structure, the Fifth Symphony reaches us in multiple, complex ways. The Committee for Artistic Affairs concluded that it was the "practical creative answer of a Soviet artist to just criticism" and an exemplar of Socialist Realism. Meanwhile the public heard profound grief and audience members wept openly during the Largo. At the height of Stalin's Terror, a thousand people were executed every day.

Fay notes that Shostakovich's lifelong reluctance to describe his music was both necessitated by survival as well as "a natural disinclination to circumscribe the multiplicity of meanings music harbours."

For me, it remains one of the most extraordinary orchestral works, at once a public response to political criticism and a deeply personal, enormously moving, mysterious work of art.


Teresa Tang, "The Moon Reflects My Heart"

This was one of my mother's favourite songs, and arguably one of the most beloved Chinese pop songs ever recorded. It is a song of fidelity and innocence, and of deep sentiment.

During the decade-long Cultural Revolution in China – which saw 36 million people targeted, countless suicides, and mass violence and murders fuelled by political denunciations and a drive towards ideological purity – only Communist Party-approved art that served the revolution was permitted.

When Deng Xiaoping came to power, China shifted to a highly controlled "open door policy", a slight loosening of the reins on Chinese traditional and contemporary art, as well as fewer restrictions on foreign goods, music, art and books. "The Moon Represents My Heart" became one of the first hits of the new era. Film director Jia Zhangke later said, The song was "something completely new. So people of my generation were suddenly infected with this very personal, individual world."

You ask how deeply I love you,
and just how great my love is.
My affection does not waver
and my love doesn't change.
The moon represents my heart.


Leonard Cohen, "Dance Me to the End of Love"

The music of Leonard Cohen has accompanied me through decades of living. This was the first of his songs that I ever heard, and has never ceased to move me. Cohen was writing about the existence of a string quartet in a concentration camp, and of the almost unbearable side-by-side existence of the sacred and the profane. He says, ‘So, that music, ‘Dance me to your beauty with a burning violin,' meaning the beauty there of being the consummation of life, the end of this existence … But it is the same language that we use for surrender to the beloved, so that the song — it's not important that anybody knows the genesis of it, because if the language comes from that passionate resource, it will be able to embrace all passionate activity."


Sun Belt (Rick Maddocks, Steven Lyons, Paul Rigby and Jon Wood), Cabalcor, "Pale Destroyer"

This is a beautiful and provocative work by Vancouver's Sun Belt, using music and text to tell the story of the rise and fall of a mythical tar sands company town. Mixing music, journals, film transcripts, environmental studies and police reports, the album blends historical and speculative storytelling to bring to life a booming resource town that, within a century, becomes a desert wasteland.

"Pale Destroyer" carries us between First Contact and the present ("The year 1509 / two suns in the morning / we looked down to find / shadows in the water / we were so young, her age / And though we traveled far / we were never free from her deep wondering"), and speaks to a history that is now.


Madeleine Thien and Do Not Say We Have Nothing links:

the author's website
the book's Wikipedia page
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Financial Times review
Guardian review
Kirkus review
New York Times review
Publishers Weekly review
Wall Street Journal review

CBC interview with the author
Financial Times interview with the author
Guardian profile of the author
Wall Street Journal interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Woody Woodmansey "Spider from Mars: My Life with Bowie"

Spider from Mars: My Life with Bowie

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Woody Woodmansey's memoir Spider from Mars follows the drummer for David Bowie's Spiders from Mars band through the recording of The Man Who Sold the World, Hunky Dory, The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars, and Aladdin Sane albums and worldwide tours.


In his own words, here is Woody Woodmansey's Book Notes music playlist for his memoir Spider from Mars: My Life with Bowie:



My book is about my memories of being David Bowie's drummer in the band Spiders From Mars so it already contains recollections of recording four albums and touring the world performing the songs from those albums. In order to write this it has brought back memories of all those songs and made me look again at what it felt like to be a contributing part of songs that have become rock and roll history. So music and its influence and inspiration is what drove us every day. Never thinking for a minute I would be re-living it all again over forty years later and telling the story!


"Ode To Joy" Stanley Kubrick Music - A Clockwork Orange

In my book I felt it was important to try to convey the feeling of anticipation and excitement, the adrenaline rush that always occurred prior to walking out on stage and delivering a David Bowie and The Spiders From Mars show.

Bowie had chosen this piece of music as our intro music and it was the perfect counterpoint being a Beethoven classical piece with an electronic arrangement.

It was arranged this way for the soundtrack of the movie A Clockwork Orange and it quickly became the cue for the band and the audience that the show was about to start.

Whenever I hear 'Ode To Joy' I always feel like I should be getting ready to walk on stage.

I listened to it many times whilst writing the book and it helped bring back memories I would have missed.


"The Wild Eyed Boy From Freecloud"

I had just re-located from the north of England on guitarist and friend Mick Ronson's recommendation in order to join Bowie's band. I didn't know much about Bowie and thought he was a folk singer that had had a hit with 'Space Oddity' and then disappeared.

On my first meeting with him I had a list of boxes in my head that I needed to tick. Could he sing? Could he write? Did he have what it takes? Sounds funny now yeah.

He'd played me some songs from his earlier recordings and they were a bit too folky and lightweight, for me, coming from a progressive rock background. As I wrote I remembered he had picked up his 12 string guitar and sitting just a few feet in front of me, he played this song…by the end of it I'd ticked the boxes and felt I'd made the right decision to join his band.


"Life On Mars"

In the book I talk in detail about the recording of what has become an iconic Bowie song, 'Life On Mars'.

I vividly remember hearing David 'plinky, plonking' on the piano he had in his bedroom. He wasn't an accomplished pianist but was brilliant at putting chords together. I listened as he completed the lyrics…'Micky Mouse has grown up a cow'. That's weird, I remember thinking.

When we went in to the studio to record the song as part of the album Hunky Dory, Rick Wakeman was hired as the pianist.

David said to him 'just treat it as a piano piece'. The result blew us all away and when Ken Scott (co-producer) called us in to hear the finished mix, it was an incredible feeling. I recall thinking 'is that what we sound like?'

That song was a turning point for us as a band. We all realised at that point that Bowie had only just scratched the surface of his actual potential. It is still my favourite song on any Bowie album.


"Starman"

It's funny to think this song was not originally part of the album The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust and The Spiders From Mars.

We had finished the album and the mixes were sent over to RCA, the record company Bowie was signed to.

They loved it but said 'there isn't a single on here and so we can't release it as it is'.

This was just before Christmas '71. David went away and wrote 'Starman' and we went back in to the studio early January and recorded it.

This was the song, that when released, led to the rocket ride to the top.

It also made sense as it brought a sort of concept together of an alien arriving on earth as a rock star! Without that song the success might never have happened!!

I honestly believe Bowie could write a hit song any time he felt like it…


Woody Woodmansey and Spider from Mars: My Life with Bowie links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

Kirkus review

Noisey interview with the author
Phawker interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists Update - January 10th

The Largehearted Boy List of Online 'Best of 2016' Book Lists

For the ninth straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find. As the lists appear online, I will add them to the master list, updating daily.

The Master List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Please feel free to leave a comment or e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online year-end book list I have missed.

Other daily updates to the 2016 master list.

Revisit previous years' collections of year-end book lists: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2000-2009 (best of the decade).


Today's additions to the Online Year-end "Best of 2016" Book Lists:


Adventures in Polishland (best books)
Always & Forever Reading (top books)
As Told by Sissy (favorite books)
CK's Reading Corner (top books)
A Dash of Ash (favorite books)
Delicate Eternity (favourite books)
fangirlfashionista (best and wrst books)
Forbes (best books about birds and birding)
Fourth & Sycamore (favorite books)
Freddiereads (favorite books)
GeekDad (best books)
ICPE Mission Singapore (favorite books)
Library of Michigan (Michigan books)
Life as Leels (best young adult books)
Martha Reynolds Writes (favorite books)
Ministry Musings (best fiction)
Muddy Colors (best books)
My Byrd Life (top nonfiction books)
My Parisian Books (top books)
Note to Selph (top books)
Notes from the Train (top books)
The Oklahoman (best graphic novels)
On a Sci-fictional Mission (books)
Outgoing Signals (best books)
Rachael Richardson Bullock (favourite books)
The Rat's Den (favorite books)
Red Violet (best books)
Retirement 2.0 (best books)
Secular Cinephile (favorite books)
She Missions (best books)
Somewhere Only We Know (best books)
Stuff That Needs Saying (top books)
Suzy's Cozy World (best books)
Tommy Wilkerson (top books)
zoe.thinks (best books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily updates to the master list

Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2016 Online Year-end Music Lists
2015 Online Year-end Music Lists
2014 Online Year-end Music Lists
2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (comics recommendations)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Michael Cunningham on Collaborating with David Bowie, The Most Anticipated Albums of 2017, and more)

Michael Cunningham discussed his musical theatre collaboration with David Bowie at GQ.


The A.V. Club and Flavorwire listed the most anticipated albums of 2017.


44 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Sunday (bringing the total number to 1,589), including Her Story Arc's best feminist books and Thinking Through History's best books.

Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting "best of 2016" music lists


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Hannah Arendt: A Life in Dark Times by Anne C. Heller
A Model World by Michael Chabon


Literary Hub interviewed author Mitchell S. Jackson.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Joe Halstead.


Stream Gnoomes' new single.


Book Riot previewed 2017's LGBTQ comics.


Dear Nora is reissuing its Mountain Rock album.


The Chronicle of Higher Education profiled author Mark Greif.


Pitchfork reconsidered Massive Attack's Mezzanine album.


The Chicago Tribune and Book Riot previewed 2017's best new books.


Musicians previewed 2017's best new artists at Pitchfork.


Min Jin Lee on selling her first novel.


A 42-track compilation album (featuring Owen Pallett and YACHT) will benefit the Ghost Ship fire victims.


The Story Prize has announced its 2017 finalists.

Congratulations to Largehearted Boy Book Notes contributor Anna Noyes.


Wayne Coyne discussed every Flaming Lips studio album at Consequence of Sound.


Literary Hub recommended books about Herge's Tintin comics.


The Quietus reconsidered David Bowie's Low album 40 years after its release.


Vogue interviewed Ayalet Waldman about her new book A Really Good Day.


Stream a new Cate Le Bon song.


Bustle previewed 2017's best graphic novels.


Stream a new song by The Proper Ornaments.


The Irish Independent recommended 2017's best books by Irish authors.


Julia Holter discussed scoring the film Bleeding for This with PopMatters,


Fanzine interviewed author Brian Evenson.


Stream a new Craig Finn song.


Signature recommended books about psychedelic drugs.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

January 9, 2017

Book Notes - "Silent Beaches, Untold Stories: New York City's Forgotten Waterfront"

Silent Beaches, Untold Stories: New York City's Forgotten Waterfront

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Silent Beaches, Untold Stories: New York City's Forgotten Waterfront is a stunning collection of works of fiction, poetry, and art about the city's untouched places.


In their own words, here is the editors' Book Notes music playlist for the book Silent Beaches, Untold Stories: New York City's Forgotten Waterfront:


Silent Beaches, Untold Stories: New York City's Forgotten Waterfront by Elizabeth Albert, with fiction and poetry edited by Underwater New York (Nicki Pombier Berger, Helen Georgas, Nicole Haroutunian), collects historical narratives, archival images, contemporary art and new literary work about ten liminal New York City waterways, and is published by Damiani. We paired each of these ten waterfronts with a song, sometimes weaving in the book's stories and art, too.


North Brother Island: "Sea of Love" by Phil Phillips, Cat Power version

Today, North Brother Island is a bird sanctuary, forbidden to human visitors. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, though, it was the site of Riverside Hospital, where people sick with infectious diseases like cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever were sent. Mary Mallon, healthy but a carrier of typhoid fever, was quarantined there against her will in 1907. Elizabeth Gaffney's story, "Bodies by the Sea," imagines into Mallon's solitary life, an island herself on tiny North Brother Island, until she meets a nurse, Adelaide Offspring, and they develop a tentative love. Cat Power's haunting version of "Sea of Love," could be the melancholy soundtrack to their relationship: Come with me my love / to the sea…Do you remember / when we met? / That's the day I knew you were my pet…


The Rockaways: "Let's Go Surfing" by The Drums

"Let's Go Surfing" starts, Wake up / it's a beautiful morning. "It was such a beautiful, clear morning"—one of the characters in Antoine Wilson's "Sticks" says of 9/11. September 11th and Hurricane Sandy are both undercurrents in "Sticks," which uses surfing as a conduit to tell a deeper story about the people, history, landscape, and resilience of the Rockaways. Similarly, The Drums' cheerful, whistling song—jaunty and fun on the surface, invoking the rollicking feeling of waves in the same way that Wilson's staccato sentences do—is darker in its depths: I wanna go surfing / I don't care about nothing. By the end of each, though, there's been a turn: Jonathan Pierce of The Drums is singing, I'll never let you go—caring very much—and Wilson's narrator is boarding a plane out of New York, passing repurposed pieces of the Rockaways boardwalk in a fast food restaurant as he goes.


Blackwell's Island: "Down By the Water" by PJ Harvey

Amy Shearn's story "House from the Bottom" takes place on present day Roosevelt Island, where a single mother contends with her own ghosts as well as those of the island's past. Formerly Blackwell's Island, the city used the narrow swatch of land in the East River to house various institutions: a penitentiary, a smallpox hospital, the abysmal Blackwell's Island Lunatic Asylum. Given that Shearn's protagonist follows a child's howling to the water's edge and merges with the specter of a young orphan who was once interred there, the first lines of PJ Harvey's song "Down by the Water"—I lost my heart / under the bridge / to that little girl / so much to leave—are almost too on-the-nose to pair with the story and location, but then again, too perfect an opportunity to miss.


Sandy Ground: "Jesus Gave Me Water" by Sam Cooke

Sam Cooke has so many water-songs, but for Sandy Ground, this one seems apt. It is hard to imagine that the waterways of New York City used to be rife with oysters. In the 19th century, though, thriving oyster beds not only existed, but provided a livelihood for, among others, a settlement of free black oystermen. Driven north from Maryland, where they were not permitted to own boats, for them, Sandy Ground in Staten Island was a sanctuary. The oystermen were joined by freed and escaped slaves from other parts of the country, and built a prosperous, vibrant community. As the text on Carrie Mae Weems's powerful artwork paired with Sandy Ground reads, You became / a whisper / a symbol of a / mighty voyage / & by the sweat of / your brow / you laboured / for self / family / & other. By 1916, increasingly polluted waters put an end to the area's oyster business; residents moved on or adapted by taking on other trades. Although a fire destroyed much of what was left of Sandy Ground in the 1960s, the Rossville A.M.E. Zion Church remains as a testament to the strength and vitality of the community to this day.


Dead Horse Bay: "Water Fountain" by tUnE-yArDs

Barren Island, where once much of the city's waste was sorted and horse bones were processed into glue, was connected to mainland Brooklyn by landfill in the early 20th century. Today, it is Dead Horse Bay, a waterfront littered with horse bones and decades of trash escaped from the landfill. Dead Horse Bay has earned the nickname Bottle Beach; picking across it, one can find today's Coronas knocking up against what could be our grandfathers' fifths of whiskey and our great-aunt's not-quite-empty perfume atomizers. The waves of the bay push and pull the bottles, creating a unique, rhythmic waterfront soundtrack, not unlike the percussive chiming in the background of tUnE-yArDs "Water Fountain."


Coney Island Creek: "Watertown" by Frank Sinatra

It is hard not to choose the Beatles "Yellow Submarine" to match with Coney Island Creek, given that there is a real-life yellow submarine half-submerged in the waterway, but we are so intrigued by the Creek's past as a stop on Rum Row, where rum-running mafiosos like Frankie "the Undertaker" Yale, Lucky Luciano, and Vito Genovese smuggled liquor during Prohibition that "Watertown" by Frank Sinatra proved the more tempting a pairing.


The Gowanus Canal: "Head Underwater" by Jenny Lewis

One can see how Jenny Lewis's existential contemplation of her own mortality in "Head Underwater" -- I put my head underwater, baby / I threw my clothes away in the trash / I stood barefoot on the blazing concrete -- could easily be set on the banks of the Gowanus. All of the associations we have with the canal are there: urban, water, garbage, death. The Gowanus is infamous for its toxins (it was once known as "Lavender Lake"), which include mysterious white goo, black mayonnaise, and even gonorrhea. This last association -- to sex -- leads us back to the tossed clothing of Lewis's song, of course, but also to Ben Greenman's story "Oracle, Ocean, Opening," where the story's protagonist, Dan, hooks up with a woman in his car while parked on the shores of the canal. Greenman's story includes a line that perfectly captures the confused state of the Gowanus today: "a rancid canal that snaked, or rather wormed, through the neighborhood in which Captain Gus lived. People said that apartment prices were going through the roof, which seemed like a mixed metaphor, or at least a collapsed one."


Newtown Creek: "Red Tide" by Neko Case

Neko Case's "Red Tide" starts, There's a smell here that stands my hair on end, which can't help but make us think of Newtown Creek. The staggering list of pollutants that have been dumped or leached into the canal over the years is too long to recount here; one does not need to approach the often-psychedelically oil-slicked surface of the Creek too closely to catch a noxious whiff of the toxins. In Bill Cheng's story, "Unfathomable," the protagonist prepares to take on the Creek's demons; in the book's image of Ennead Architect's "Digester Eggs," a wastewater treatment plant, the sky, and its ominous reflection on the eggs, glows red.


Hart Island: "Silent the Voice" by Slapp Happy

Silent and dark, surrounded by dangerous currents, Hart Island is NYC's public cemetery, the resting place of over a million of the city's unclaimed dead. The dead have at times shared the island with the living, a reformatory for "vicious boys," a "lunatic asylum" for women, a Nike missile base, Phoenix House drug rehabilitation center have all at one time or another occupied part of its 101 acres. But the dead remain. They are packed into mass graves each containing 150 adults or 1000 babies. Many of the dead are buried at Hart Island, not because of indigence, but because the city was unable to locate their families or loved ones quickly enough. Some people have been buried there as a result of a bureaucratic error. Until very recently it has been next to impossible for families and loved ones to gain access to visit and mourn. There they lie in an island off the waters of the Bronx, where the East River opens into the Long Island Sound.

I imagine "Silent the Voice" as a conversation between the dead and the living. I think of it as a mother who lost her daughter, or perhaps between lovers. The song begins with cowbells that echo the harbor buoys. The rhythm has a seasick lilt. And then Dagmar Krause's voice, whispering to us and then calling out to the loved one, "If you could cover my body with flowers." "If I could imprint my soul with you eyes." Choked with frustration, desire, remorse. I think of the heart-broken people who are willing to go through such hurdles to visit to a forgotten island of mass graves, if only for a chance of some tiny measure of relief.


College Point: "The Jumblies," music by George Ingraham, from Nonsense Songs by Edward Lear

"Ave Maria" by Herbert von Nessler was Willhelm Steinway's favorite song. I found this on a concert playlist from 1903 following Ave Maria. It somehow makes me think of Steinway's friend and founder of College Point, Conrad Poppenhusen. Beginning in the 1850's Poppenhusen made a fortune from using Goodyear's vulcanized rubber recipe to make combs, corset stays and other products. He built a kind of utopian community for his employees surrounding his American Hard Rubber Manufacturing Company.


Silent Beaches, Untold Stories: New York City's Forgotten Waterfront links:

the book's website

New York Times review

The Brian Lehrer Show interview with one of the editors
Hyperallergic interview with one of the editors
WFUV's Cityscape interview with two of the editors


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (2017's Most Anticipated Books, New Music from Julien Baker, and more)

The Guardian previewed 2017's most anticipated books.


Stream a new Julien Baker song.


44 "best books of 2016" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy yesterday (bringing the total number to 1,589), including Her Story Arc's best feminist books and Thinking Through History's best books.

Largehearted Boy's list of essential and interesting "best of 2016" music lists


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Hannah Arendt: A Life in Dark Times by Anne C. Heller
A Model World by Michael Chabon


Emma Donoghue shared her writing routine with the Guardian.


Fluxblog shared a collection of songs from 1990.


The Guardian interviewed author Yaa Gyaasi.


Stream Gorilla vs. Bear's favorite songs of 2016.


Literary Hub listed books that have been called "the great American novel."


Consequence of Sound ranked the albums of David Bowie.


Ayelet Waldman discussed her new book with the New York Times.


Stereogum listed 2017's most anticipated albums.


Authors discussed their favorite funny books at the Guardian.


The Creative Independent interviewed singer-songwriter Cass McCombs.


The Australian previewed 2017's best new books.


Pitchfork previewed 2017's best albums.


Paste listed the best sci-fi comics.


The Upcoming previewed 2017's most anticipated albums.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed Kelly Luce about her debut novel


The Band guitarist Robie Robbertson discussed his new memoir Testimony with World Cafe.


Emma Straub talked indie bookstores with Huffington Post.


Psychology Today examined the neuroscience behind why music brings us pleasure.


Real Pants interviewed author Leesa Cross-Smith.


Stream four new Spoon songs.


Powell's Books recommended books for President Obama and President-elect Trump.


Watch a new David Bowie video.


GQ recommended January's best books.


R.I.P., influential jazz critic Nat Hentoff.


BuzzFeed shared Emily Gould's essay from the anthology Scratch: Writers, Money, and the Art of Making a Living.


CLRVYNT interviewed the duo Uniform.


So Say We All interviewed author Meredith Alling.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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