Quantcast



April 22, 2015

Shorties (Haruki Murakami's Advertorial Short Short Stories, Amanda Palmer on Crowdfunding, and more)

Haruki Murakami's advertorial short stories.


Forbes interviewed singer-songwriter Amanda Palmer about crowdfunding.


Bustle recommended literary podcasts.


Stream a new Milk Carton Kids song.


Paula Hawkins talked to the Guardian about writing her novel The Girl on the Train.


Patterson Hood of the Drive-By Truckers talked southern rock with the Monterey Herald.


STET interviewed Amber Tamblyn about her poetry collection Dark Sparkler.


Red Bull Music Academy, Paste and PopMatters interviewed Sadie Dupuis of the band Speedy Ortiz.


Listen to Kurt Cobain's cover of the Beatles' "And I Loved Her."


The Telegraph interviewed author Toni Morrison.


Sean and Sara Watkins covered Fleetwood Mac's "Steal Your Love Away"


A reading series that pairs books with food and drink.


Filmmaker John Carpenter talked soundtracks and music making with FACT.


Rolling Stone interviewed Paul Beatty about his new novel The Sellout.


All Things Considered interviewed Michael Angelakos about the new Passion Pit album, Kindred.


The Guardian listed the best closing lines of books.


Creative Boom listed Europe's top summer music festivals.


Flavorwire listed the best poetry books of the decade so far.


Stream a new My Morning Jacket song.


Courtney Maum discussed the debut author experience at BuzzFeed.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Sleater-Kinney's Carrie Browstein.


Follow Largehearted Boy on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us





April 22, 2015

Daily Downloads (Ben Frost, Frances Luke Accord, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers free and legal music and/or stream.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

The Ballroom Thieves: The Ballroom Thieves EP [mp3]

Ben Frost: "Rare Decay" [mp3]

Frances Luke Accord: Live at Strobe EP [mp3]

Junior College: The Carribean Winter album [mp3]

Mina's Ghost: Goodnight and Love EP [mp3]

Misun: "After Me" [mp3] from Feel Better EP (out May 29th)

The Monochrome Set: "Oh, You're Such a Star" [mp3] from Spaces Everywhere

Montropo: "More Light" [mp3]

Radar: "Give Up on the Now" [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

The Instruments: 2005-03-24, Athens [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Daily Downloads

covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 21, 2015

Book Notes - Andrew Roe "The Miracle Girl"

v

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Andrew Roe's debut novel The Miracle Girl is a compelling story of faith and family.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"A winning debut . . . Lively, pitch-perfect and assured . . . Roe's story feels just right for our desperate and despairing time, when a miracle--any miracle--will do."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Andrew Roe's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel The Miracle Girl:


Music is one of my great companions in life, and here are some of the songs that accompanied me while I wrote my debut novel The Miracle Girl.

Warning: There's a fairly high ratio of classic rock, which was the soundtrack of my high school years, and which also, coincidentally, happens to be the high school soundtrack of two of the main characters in my book.

"Alesund" – Sun Kil Moon

I'll start at the end: One Saturday morning, after dropping off my kids at my mom's house in San Clemente, California, I went to a nearby café to write. I knew I was getting close to being done with my novel—and by "done" I mean the version of the manuscript that I felt good enough about to print out and do a final line edit before I sent it off to my agent. It turned out that I reached this point sooner than I thought, after maybe an hour or so. I typed "The End" (yes, writers actually do that) and I was stunned and it was as if the book had been officially birthed (though of course more changes and edits would come later). The café is near the ocean, so I took a celebratory walk along the beach, and this beautiful, haunting song came on my iPod. And whenever I listen to it now, it invariably takes me back to that moment in time. The beach. The waves. The relief. The years of work. I was done. I had written a book.

"Scarlet Town" – Gillian Welch

I don't care much for writing in public places, but it became a necessity to make progress on (and eventually finish) this book. It was either the café mentioned above or a Starbucks near my house. These coffee houses are crowded, noisy, not ideal for writing (not for me at least) and also typically have piped-in music, so I'd bring my iPod to combat the din of conversation and slurping espresso machines. Usually I can only listen to instrumental music when writing. But when working on The Miracle Girl, I often listened to Gillian Welch's The Harrow & The Harvest. This lead-off track always put me in the place I needed to go.

"He Stopped Loving Her Today" – George Jones

This one is actually in the book. There's an early scene in a dive-y bar, where we're introduced to one of the main characters, John, who's the father of the title character. He's fucked up his life and he knows it. He's left his family but he wants to find his way back. He's drinking, both trying to remember and trying to forget. This song comes on the jukebox. It stings like only a song can sting when you hear it in the right (or wrong) place at the right (or wrong) time. Probably one of the saddest songs ever in the entire sad catalogue of country music.

"Speak to Me/Breathe" – Pink Floyd

Going to Griffith Park for Laserium and Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon was a ritual for teenagers growing up in Southern California in the 1980s. If you're not familiar, it went like this: carfuls of intoxicated teens made the pilgrimage to Griffith Observatory on Saturday night and soaked in a laser light show, accompanied by the iconic, best-selling album. I did it a couple of times, and in The Miracle Girl we learn that John and his wife, Karen, did it, too. The moment when the sound effects and heartbeats of "Speak to Me" transition into the trilling guitar chord of "Breathe" (that's when the lasers would light up the dome of the observatory and the music would fully kick in) caused many faces to melt and many minds to be blown (at least temporarily).

"Dance the Night Away" – Van Halen

John and Karen have a rocky relationship. When they finally decide to get married, it's a quickie courthouse ceremony, not the kind of wedding that most people envision—it feels more like a defeat than a celebration. But it's part of who these characters are—people who are young and already feel like life isn't working out for them, yet they aren't really sure what to do about it. Their wedding night is equally non-cinematic. It's fast food for dinner and Van Halen II as the wedding night soundtrack. Van Halen I was the more popular album and the one that's remembered today, but the sequel seemed like a better (and perhaps sadder) fit John and Karen and where they are in their lives. (Random personal trivia: Van Halen's bass player, Michael Anthony, bought my grandmother's house in Monrovia, California, for his sister.)

"Cocaine" – Eric Clapton

John and Karen have a child, Anabelle, who ends up becoming the Miracle Girl of the title after a tragic car accident (I won't say more). The couple shakily enters the world of parenthood; John is particularly unprepared and overwhelmed. When he tries to comfort his crying daughter during the night, he realizes he doesn't know the words to any lullabies or kids' songs, so he resorts to singing rock songs like "Cocaine," "Iron Man," "Sunshine of Your Love," "Dazed and Confused," etc. "‘If you want to hang out/You've gotta take her out/Cocaine.' Now go to sleep little one."

"Your Hand in Mind" – Explosions in the Sky

Remember when I said I liked to listen to instrumentals when I write?

"Ramble On" – Led Zeppelin

"He was one of those one-handed, cool-guy Southern California drivers who barely grasp the wheel and concentrate more on the scenery and the radio station than the road and the death and horror and destruction looming everywhere. So she wondered: Had there been a brief lapse there, a moment when a bikinied billboard or a Led Zeppelin song he hadn't heard in years had taken precedence over the safety of Anabelle, their seven-year-old child, their world?"

"Horses" – Bonnie "Prince" Billy

There was a time when I was deep into writing and revising the book, and this was my go-to commute song. I have a fairly long drive to get to work, so music plays a big part in keeping me sane. It also gives me space and time to think about what I'm writing (what's working, what's not; what can be fixed, what can't). This country/folk/badass song opens with the line "I'd be riding horses if they'd let me." Something about that haunted me for several weeks, and I often thought of John. The line felt like it was speaking directly about him: someone feeling trapped, someone wanting to escape, transcend. "Horses" is one of those songs that you hear in your car and you feel like driving across the entire country.

"I Believe in You" – Neil Young

From Young's melancholic masterpiece After the Gold Rush, one of the lesser-known/cited songs but always one of my favorites from the album. Because of the slow unfolding of the music. Because of the yearning in the lyrics and in the singer's voice. The Miracle Girl is a book about belief—the power of it, the mystery of it. It's about the big beliefs (god, miracles, etc.), but also the smaller, day-to-day beliefs and the everyday miracles in life, as well as the importance of the people we believe in and trust and love. This song reminds me of that. Belief was a beginning and it's what got me started on the book and thinking that I might have something to say.


Andrew Roe and The Miracle Girl links:

the author's website
excerpt fro the book

Kirkus review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - April 21, 2015

Rocky Votolato

Rocky Votolato's intense and personal Hospital Handshakes is easily my favorite new album this week.

Built to Spill's Untethered Moon, San Fermin's Jackrabbit, and Say Lou Lou's Lucid Dreaming are other releases I can recommend.

Reissues include vinyl editions of two Modest Mouse albums, Building Nothing Out of Something and Interstate 8.

What new releases are you picking up this week? What can you recommend? Have I left anything noteworthy off the list?


This week's interesting music releases:

Alabama Shakes: Sound & Color
As It Is: Never Happy Ever After
Bjork: Vulnicora [vinyl]
BoDeans: I Can't Stop
Buena Vista Social Club: Lost and Found
Built to Spill: Untethered Moon
Death: N.E.W.
Drake: If You're Reading This It's Too Late
Dustin Kensrue: Carry the Fire
Frank Sinatra: Ultimate Sinatra (100 Songs Celebrating 100 Years) (4-CD box set)
Geographer: Ghost Modern [vinyl]
Girl Band: The Early Years EP [vinyl]
Good Riddance: Peace in Our Time
Great Lake Swimmers: A Forest of Arms
Joe Pug: Windfall [vinyl]
Joywave: How Do You Feel Now?
Low Cut Connie: Hi Honey
Mavis Staples: Your Good Fortune
Milky Wimpshake: Encore, Un Effort
Miniboone: Bad Sports
Modest Mouse: Building Nothing Out of Something (reissue) [vinyl]
Modest Mouse: Interstate 8 (reissue) [vinyl]
Mylets: Arizona
Nicki Bluhm and The Gramblers: Loved Wild Lost
OOFJ: Acute Feast
Passion Pit: Kindred
The Peter Ulrich Collaboration: Tempus Fugitives
Rocky Votolato: Hospital Handshakes
Rush: A Farewell to Kings (reissue) [vinyl]
Ryan Adams: Ryan Adams: Live at Carnegie Hall
Sam Lewis: Waiting on You
San Fermin: Jackrabbit
Say Lou Lou: Lucid Dreaming
Skinny Lister: Down On Deptford Broadway
Speedy Ortiz: Foil Deer
Squarepusher: Damogen Furies
Stealing Sheep: Not Real
Terra Lightfoot: Every Time My Mind Runs Wild
They Might Be Giants: Glean
Tom DeLonge: To The Stars … Demos, Odds and Ends
Turbo Fruits: No Control
Various Artists: The Alchemist and Oh No Present: Welcome to Los Santos
Wire: Wire
Yelawolf: Love Story


also at Largehearted Boy:

weekly music release lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (The 2015 Pulitzer Prizes, Viv Albertine on Her Memoir, and more)

The 2015 Pulitzer prizes were awarded yesterday.

Anthony Doerr won the fiction prize with his novel All the Light We Cannot See.


The Media interviewed Viv Albertine about her memoir Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys.


PopMatters interviewed Colin Newman of the band Wire.


The most literate cities in the United States.


All Things Considered profiled the Alabama Shakes.


Bookforum interviewed author Sarah Manguso.


Dummy listed its favorite songs of the year so far.


Rosie Schaap paired poems with drinks at Saveur.


Bjork's favorite TED talks.


Emily Bitto has been awarded Australia's Stella Prize for her novel The Strays.


Courtney Barnett covered John Cale's "Close Watch."


The photography of Allen Ginsberg.


Singer-songwriter Jose Gonzales visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


The Guardian reviewed the musical theater adaptation of Alison Bechdel's graphic memoir Fun Home.


Paste recommended relaxing movie soundtracks to listen to while studying.


Fresh Air and Mother Jones interviewed author Toni Morrison.


The Washington Post is no fan of "poptimism."

"For a good critic, listening to a recording should be like a skeptical stroll around the new-car lot, not an unwrapping frenzy on Christmas morning. Listening alongside fans on social media, racing toward a verdict, too many writers seem to be getting swept away in the lovefest."


Follow Largehearted Boy on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Daily Downloads (The Local Strangers, Hiss Golden Messenger, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers free and legal music and/or stream.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Arms Akimbo: Vignettes EP [mp3]

Art School Girls: Art School Girls EP [mp3]

As Lonely As Dave Bowman: Monolith album [mp3]

The Ballroom Thieves: Homestead EP [mp3]

Beach Bodies: Swimmer EP [mp3]

The Brave Kind: "Dogs" [mp3]

Gum: Gum album [mp3]

The Local Strangers: Take What You Can Carry album [mp3]

Plush: Pine album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Hiss Golden Messenger: 2015-04-17, Saxapahaw [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Daily Downloads

covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 20, 2015

Book Notes - Jeffrey Rotter "The Only Words That Are Worth Remembering"

The Only Words That Are Worth Remembering

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jeffrey Rotter's novel The Only Words That Are Worth Remembering is darkly comic and poignant throughout, and one of the finest dystopian works I have read in years.

Open Letters Monthly wrote of the book:

"The extent to which the Van Zandts rekindle any kind of hope – or embody it – is one of the many fascinating strands running through Rotter's book as we follow Rowan's adventures in a life he never imagined for himself. The result is a novel that stands out even in the grotesquely overcrowded current field of dystopian fiction."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Jeffrey Rotter 's Book Notes music playlist for his novel The Only Words That Are Worth Remembering:


After he commits the bizarre crime that fractures his family, Rowan, the hapless hero of The Only Words That Are Worth Remembering, flees the ruins of Cape Canaveral. After many detours, some of the worst jobs I could imagine, and a shameful detox in the presence of mountain goats, he reaches the high Chilean desert. Every road trip gets the mix tape it deserves, and Rowan's is absurd and grim. The music on this list isn't mentioned in the book, but it comprises part of the Downcast Lo-Energy Playlist that got me pumped down each morning before the typing began.

Fete des belles eaux: VI. L'eau: Messiaen wrote this for a then-futuristic instrument called the ondes martenot. It's a rippling, hopeful piece composed to accompany dancing waters and fireworks on the Seine during the 1937 Paris Exposition. Albert Speer's German pavilion loomed nearby, a Nazi eagle perched on the roof ready to snatch away that hope. Messiaen would be captured by the Nazis some three years later. In prison, he composed and performed Quatuor Pour la Fin Du Temps, my favorite jam when the world ends. The Only Words isn't really post-apocalytic; the Van Zandt's world is the result of slow degradation following a hard swing toward libertarian rule. It's Florida. But I'm less disturbed by apocalypse than I am by the continued slide.

"Children Crying," The Congos: I prefer my reggae biblical. And this Lee Perry production is like Moses ran the Burning Bush through an Echoplex while Aaron played dub bass. I would never compare Rowan's journey to find the last intact telescope on earth to the Israelites halting trek through the wilderness, but the horror of struggling to reach something that may not exist—that was what I was going for.

"Weak Brain, Narrow Mind," Willie Dixon: The lyrics read like a father's instructions to his child: "You know the strong overpower the weak/And the smart overpower the strong." So why does Dixon sing it with so much world-weariness? Could it be the kind of wishful thinking we parents pass off as a life lesson? Rowan is one of the few who understands how the cosmos works, and he hopes that knowledge will bring his daughter a better life, so he addresses The Only Words to her. This song reminds me of Stanley Elkin's comment about powerlessness being the engine of contemporary comedy. The Van Zandts are the butt of this joke, and they don't understand why it's so funny.

"Treatment Bound," the Replacements: I first heard this song when I was working at a formalwear shop in Columbia, South Carolina. It was a high school job, and we were often enlisted to model in bridal fairs at the mall. We'd hit the ice-sculpture champagne fountain hard, pass out in the dressing room, and then hit Orange Julius to rehydrate. The dope'n'mope routine of late adolescence has probably not changed since the Bronze Age, and I don't expect it will abate in the distant future. Rowan spends his adolescence and early twenties on the lam, trying to escape a drug habit and his loneliness; little does he know, he's actually running toward something beautiful.

"Everything Merges With the Night," Brian Eno: Rowan has a moment of rapture when, upon reaching a high-altitude observatory under clear skies, he feels as if he's floating among the stars. I had a similar experience during a night hike at the Grand Canyon. I was eight, and we'd walked out onto a narrow promontory. The Milky Way was in my ears, my hair. The earth collapsed to the size of my Chuck Taylors, but I didn't fall. Society in The Only Words fails because it turns its back on the stars (and on science in general). What a lonesome place that would be.

"The Wonderful Widow of Eighteen Springs," John Cage: I remember fleeing a job as a county fair security guard in New Mexico. I left in the middle of the night and drove north. By the time I reached the Colorado border, I was having the usual road hallucinations (descending space ark, bright face comets that streak across the headlamps.) I have no idea what this song is about, or if it is about. (Something to do with James Joyce.) But in this version Robert Wyatt wrings so much creepy absurdity from the lyrics that it feels like the most thrilling road-trip hallucination.

"Nothin'," Townes Van Zandt: TVZ is one of the ghosts that haunts this book. "Nothin'" provided the title: "Sorrow and solitude/These are the precious things/And the only words that are worth remembering." (See also: Lucinda Williams's heart-shredding cover.) It was actually months into writing before I noticed another connection between the song and my story. The Only Words is about the relationship between brothers—one too strong, the other too weak—both fleeing the world. Van Zandt sings:

As brothers our troubles are
Locked in each others arms
And you better pray
They never find you

'Cause your back ain't strong enough
For burdens doublefold
They'd crush you down
Down into nothin'


Jeffrey Rotter and The Only Words That Are Worth Remembering links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

BookPage review
NPR Books review
Open Letters Monthly review
Publishers Weekly review

The Brad Bogner Show interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for The Unknown Knowns


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Nick Courage "The Loudness"

The Loudness

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Nick Courage's The Loudness is a fast-pitched entertaining debut novel, a fascinating dystopian book for middle graders as well as their parents.

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Nick Courage's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel The Loudness:


I first got the inspiration for The Loudness during a stretch where I listened to Vivida Vis! by Against Me! on repeat for about three days straight. But I won't be including "This Is Control" on this playlist; there's just too much cussing for a middle grade novel. If you'd like a link to that song, please have a parent or guardian send a signed note with their permission.


"Too Much Freedom" by Lou Barlow

The Loudness opens in a battered coastal city, in the aftermath of a series of devastating storms. What's left of our thirteen-year-old protagonist's hometown is overgrown and sun baked, and rather than help the remaining inhabitants rebuild, he watches their progress from an attic window. This song might as well be playing in the background.

"New Orleans" by Caves

Though the city is never explicitly named in the book, it's roughly based on New Orleans. I'm a New Orleanian, but have lived in the Northeast for most of my adult life. So long, in fact, that this UK-based punk band is able to perfectly capture the distance and road-trip longing that characterizes my relationship with the city, both in The Loudness and in everyday life.

"A Political Song About Cassette Tapes" by Mike Petruccelli

I'm terrible at keeping a lot of lyrics in my head at once; I'll listen to a text-heavy song like this and immediately forget the words. The silver lining: I can listen to "A Political Song About Cassette Tapes" a million times in a row without getting sick of it. Which is what I did while writing The Loudness, the line about "not knowing what's beyond the neighborhood" standing out each time, fresh and new.

"Indictment" by Jawbreaker

I used to think a lot about Blake Schwarzenbach as a sort of platonic ideal of Literature and Punk. My ideal, to be honest, in high school. I don't think about Blake that way anymore (like the rest of my teen idols, he's become mortal), but I still listen to a lot of Jawbreaker, and there's something about "Indictment"—a typically caustic song about writing a happy song—that captures the jaded resilience of the characters in my story.

"Unpredictable" by Sundials

I can't listen to the loopy guitar riff that runs through this song without picturing my protagonist, Henry, riding his bike down deserted city streets in big, sleepy esses.

"San Andreas" by The Visitors

I first heard this song on The Thing That Ate Larry Livermore, a compilation by the author of Spy Rock Memories (a fantastic memoir about how Larry escaped into the mountains while starting up Lookout Records). In many ways, this and the other road trip songs might be a little bit too on-the-nose for The Loudness, which (spoiler alert) includes a road trip. But this is such a perfect road trip song…

"Piano Fire" by Sparklehorse

"I can't seem to breathe with a rusted metal heart," and everything else about this track. It plays like it's off an album Henry might have salvaged from the storms: pleasantly warped, with fuzzed out riffs and built-in nostalgia.

"Never Were" by The Worriers

I love The Worriers—especially their Past Lives 7". This is song isn't on that record, but it is about the nuances of radicalism and revolution, which is also a major theme in The Loudness.

"Electrocution" by Bill Fox

I don't want to give away too many plot points, but those lightning bolts on the cover? Are there for a reason.

"The Stars Were Exploding" by Good Luck

"So we gathered up the broken stars, lit a spark, put them back up in the sky. If you can wish on their falling, imagine what you can do bringing them back to life."

"Fix My Brain" by The Marked Men

This song is too often the soundtrack to my life, and definitely would've been the soundtrack to my life when I was thirteen (that distinction goes to Operation Ivy, also on this mix). Between "Unpredictable" and "Too Much Freedom," this is also the soundtrack to thirteen-year-old Henry's life.

"Which Way To Go" by The Eddy Current Suppression Ring

I'm a big fan of road trip songs, but I'm an even bigger fan of psychic road trip songs. I should clarify: not songs about cross-country astral projections—although, I'd be into those, too. More: psychological journey songs about figuring out what to do with yourself, your life, etc. There's a whole genre of punk that I call "Tony Robbins Rock" that's basically just self-affirmation you can dance to. This is better, because it's not as sure of itself. It's a psychic road trip without a map.

"I Don't Want Solidarity If It Means Holding Hands With You" by Defiance, Ohio

"I've gotta get my voice and my fist on the same page as my heart / as my heart."


"In the Middle of the Sea" by Chris Wollard & The Ship Thieves

I lived in Gainesville, Florida for a few years, during which time I fell in love with both Central Florida and No Idea Records, the label whose shirts now make up most of my wardrobe. This song, by longtime swamp rocker and No Idea MVP Chris Wollard, is basically the exact pace and tone I was trying to achieve with The Loudness.

"Unsatisfied" by The Replacements

I have another Spotify playlist that I sometimes turn to – it's just thirty minutes of "Unsatisfied" by The Replacements. If there's a more resonant and evocative rock song, I haven't heard it.

"Lungs Quicken" by Lanterns on the Lake

I don't know how many times I listened to Gracious Tide, Take Me Home while writing – hundreds? And I still couldn't tell you what the lyrics are – they just wash into the mix in a way that I find completely relaxing. I'm just now realizing that the album's cover art has a worn effect echoed by the cover of my book.

"If I Knew" by Paul Baribeau


Oh, wait… this song might be more emotionally resonant and evocative than "Unsatisfied" – although, it's not really fair to compare. Every few years I rediscover Paul Baribeau and remember that he's one of the best songwriters going. This track, specifically, captures the uncertainty and earnestness of Henry – and his placelessness (physical and otherwise). If I could hug this track, I would.

"The Crowd" by Operation Ivy

There's a lot of what I consider to be mellow or introspective songs on this mix, but The Loudness isn't a quiet novel. If it were an album, I would've wanted it to be released on Lookout Records, and more specifically: I would've wanted it to be Operation Ivy's Energy, which I've listened to at least once a month since I was thirteen years old.


Nick Courage and The Loudness links:

the author's website

Paris Review essay by the author
Tor.com contribution by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Stoner Books for 4/20, Rock Memoirs Worth Reading, and more)

Bustle recommended stoner reads for 4/20.


The Irish Times listed rock memoirs worth reading.


SPIN listed essential Damon Albarn albums not by Blur.


Literary maps of the United States,


NPR Music is streaming Paul de Jong's album IF.


Litro interviewed Paul McVeigh about his debut novel The Good Son.


Read Laurie Anderson and Patti Smith's speeches at Lou Reed's induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.


The Rumpus interviewed author Jill Alexander Essbaum.


NPR Music is streaming Jackson Scott's Sunshine Redux album.


The Library of Congress has posted online many recordings from its Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature.


SPIN interviewed members of the band Wire.


OUPblog shared a reading list for Earth Day.


NPR Music is streaming the new Brown Bird album Axis Mundi.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author James Tadd Adcox.


The Arts Desk interviewed singer-songwriter Ron Sexsmith.


The Baltimore Sun profiled author Michael Chabon.


NPR Music is streaming Bill Fay's new album Who Is the Sender.


All Things Considered interviewed Steven Milhauser about his new short story collection Voices in the Night.


NPR Music is streaming Braids' new album Deep in the Iris.


Weekend Edition interviewed poet Gary Snyder.


Drowned in Sound is streaming the new Mew album + -.


BuzzFeed recommended Indian graphic novels.


The A.V. Club recommended entry points into the psychobilly music genre.


The Quietus interviewed author Atticus Lish.


Newsday interviewed Ellis Ludwig-Leone of the band San Fermin.


The New York Times reviewed the musical based on Alison Bechdel's graphic memoir Fun Home.


Noisey profiled the women of the UK punk scene that influenced the Riot Grrrl movement,.


BuzzFeed recommended spring's best new books.


Weekend Edition noted the return t popularity of the flexidisc.


Longreads shared an excerpt from James Grissom's book Follies of God: Tennessee Williams and the Women of the Fog.


Follow Largehearted Boy on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Tumblr, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Daily Downloads (The Ataris, Kaki King, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers free and legal music and/or stream.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

The Ataris: Record Store Day 2015 album [mp3]
The Ataris: Live in Los Angeles album [mp3]

Claire Cottrill: Claire Cottrill EP [mp3]

Connections: Live on WFMU [mp3]

Crazy Heart: Auto Twang EP [mp3]

Lyttle King: "Drink and Swoon" [mp3]

Rachel Taylor: Magnetic Sampler EP [mp3]

Teen Cult: Teen Cult EP [mp3]

Valise: Young Bloomer album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Kaki King: 2013-03-28, Limoges [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Daily Downloads

covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 19, 2015

Largehearted Boy Weekly Wrap-Up - April 19, 2015

A list of the past week's Largehearted Boy features:


Book Notes: (authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates to their book)

Andre Alexis for his novel Fifteen Dogs
Janaka Stucky for his poetry collection The Truth Is We Are Perfect
Lindsey Palmer for her novel If We Lived Here
Marian Palaia for her novel The Given World
Sarah Layden for her novel Trip Through Your Wires
Sassafras Lowrey for her novel Lost Boi


Weekly New Book Recommendations:

Atomic Books Comics Preview (recommended new comics and graphic novels)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


New Music Recommendations:

The Week's Interesting Music Releases


And of course, the daily music and news posts:

Daily Downloads (10 free and legal mp3 downloads every day, plus links to free live recordings online)
Shorties (news & links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)


also at Largehearted Boy:

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines
Atomic Books Comics Preview
Book Notes
Contests / Giveaways
Cover Song Collections
Daily Downloads
Lists
weekly music release lists
musician/author Interviews
Note Books
Soundtracked
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Daily Downloads (The Week's Best Free and Legal Music Including Waxahatchee, A 2015 Bonnaroo Compilation Album, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers free and legal music and/or stream.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Alice Boman: Folkadelphia Session EP [mp3]

Chastity Belt: "Time to Go Home" [mp3] from Time to Go Home

Les Jupes: Some Kind of Family album [mp3]

Mountain Goats: 2015-04-02, Nashville [mp3]
Mountain Goats: 2015-04-11, New York [mp3]

Soundstatues: Soundstatues EP [mp3]

Summer Fiction: "Lauren Lorraine" [mp3]

Various Artists: The Best Carpark Compilation In The World...Ever! album [mp3]

Various Artists: Bonnaroo Mixtape 2015 album [mp3]

Waxahatchee: 2015-04-16, Cincinnati [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Mountain Goats: 2015-04-16, Cincinnati [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Daily Downloads

covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Google
  Web largeheartedboy.com