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September 12, 2014

Book Notes - Laila Lalami "The Moor's Account"

Sherwood Nation

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Laila Lalami's ambitious and captivating The Moor's Account impresses with its authentic voice and illumination of the 16th century conquistadors interactions with the New World.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Estebanico’s account alternates between this disastrous mission and his past as a merchant, with the two threads combining to create a deeply layered, complex portrait of all-too-familiar characters in an unfamiliar world. The result is a totally engrossing and captivating novel that reconsiders the overlooked roles of Africans in New World exploration"

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Laila Lalami's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Moor's Account:


My third novel, The Moor's Account is based on the true story of the first African explorer of America, a Moroccan slave known as Estebanico. To write the book, I had to do a lot of research on Spanish conquest of America and, more specifically, on the failed Narváez expedition of 1527. I read dozens of sources on the political and cultural climate of sixteenth-century Morocco, Spain, and America. And I had to write about this often bloody history while maintaining the voice and point of view of a sixteenth-century Moroccan slave. Here are some of the pieces I listened to while writing the book:

"Symphony No. 4," Brahms
I started all my workdays with Brahms. Often, I would still be answering emails when "Symphony No. 4" began to play, but by the end of the first movement, I was ready to write. I can't explain how or why it inspired me so much, but it always did.

"Ech Edani," Souad Massi
The North African darbouka drum pairs well with the Spanish guitar. Add Souad Massi's mesmerizing voice and her beautiful lyrics and you have the perfect song for a book like The Moor's Account, where cross-cultural encounters are so central to the story.

"The Promised Land" – Bruce Springsteen
My commute to the University of California, where I teach fiction and nonfiction, is frighteningly long. To keep myself from losing my mind, I listen to Bruce Springsteen. I often use my time in the car to think about problems I have in a scene.

"Marikan" - Aza
I came across Aza's music at a concert in Los Angeles six or seven years ago, where they played Tamazight (Berber) music. They use both traditional instruments, like the guenbri, and modern instruments, like the electric bass. The fusion is particularly successful on this track.

"Killing in the Name Of" – Rage Against the Machine
I'm not generally a fan of angry rock, but the themes of this song make it a good fit for a novel about conquest. Every time RATM came up on the radio last year, my ten-year-old and I head-banged together.

Birth of the Cool – Miles Davis
When I was revising the novel, I used different tricks to force myself to look at the text with new eyes. For instance, I changed the font type and size or I went to sit in a different room in the house. I also listened to Birth of the Cool, which always gave me the energy to take on yet another draft.

"Cello Sonata No. 1" – Brahms
Another favorite is this cello sonata from Brahms. One of the challenges of writing this book was creating the voice of a sixteenth-century man, which had to feel authentic without being dated or stilted. To do that, I relied a lot on instrumental music, which is why my beloved Brahms was such a big part of my daily routine.


Laila Lalami and The Moor's Account links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

BookPage review
Kirkus review
Los Angeles Times review
The Millions review
New York Times review

All Things Considered interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Secret Son
The Nervous Breakdown self-interview by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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September 12, 2014

Book Notes - Benjamin Parzybok "Sherwood Nation"

Sherwood Nation

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Benjamin Parzybok's new novel Sherwood Nation is a riveting and imaginative retelling of the Robin Hood myth set in a near-future dystopia.

Shelf Awareness wrote of the book:

"Sherwood Nation--Benjamin Parzybok's second novel, after Couch--is a fast-moving tale of ideas and action, lent credibility by current headlines and engaging characters. Parzybok's apocalyptic future is so realistic, readers may think twice before guzzling a big glass of ice water."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Benjamin Parzybok's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Sherwood Nation:


Sherwood Nation is about a woman who secedes a neighborhood and runs it as her own country, an enclave, during a period of extreme drought. Within, the city's mayor plays video games, a retiring drug dealer wishes he could read tea leaves, an ad exec digs a tunnel under his house, and a cafe barista becomes a revered hero. Sherwood Nation's playlist speaks to each of these, while, I hope, making a kick-ass mixtape. Enjoy!


"Fake Empire" - The National, from Boxer

The empire has fallen. Let's put a little something in our lemonade! (Probably that drought-ration moonshine.)

"Scared Money" - Saul Williams, from The Inevitable Rise and Fall of Niggy Tardust

A rallying call to the disenfranchised. This song is a masterpiece.

"Fuck the bullshit
Whether from the hill or from the pulpit
Today, I put my money
On the fall of every culprit"

"Bag of Hammers" - Thao, from We Brave Bee Stings and All

The image Thao paints here, of a woman standing on a lawn with a bag of hammers in her hand, on the verge of wreaking holy hell on the house in front of her, is perfect. Renee, aka Maid Marian, gathers her own army on the city's front lawn.

"Halo," by The Upsidedown, from Human Destination

A halo is a dangerous weapon. By my friends The Upsidedown. #portlandband

"Paris is Burning" - St Vincent, from Marry Me

A city that has not burned is a city full of tinder. In order to seed the new nation with some wealth, Josh and Jamal steal a city truck full of water rations. One of them won't make it back.

"Neighborhood #1 (Tunnels)" - Arcade Fire, from Funeral

The ad executive from the city's ad firm has lost his job. In his new free time, he obsessively builds a tunnel under his house for reasons he's not entirely clear.

"City of Refuge" - Abigail Washington

While the city around them falls apart, the small nation at its center, housing 20 to 30 thousand citizens, are getting their shit together. For now, it's a refuge.

"Dog Walkers of the New Age" - Breathe Owl Breathe

The surreality of this song mirrors how I imagine those first few days of the new nation, when you wake up unsure to what nation you belong, and what the implications of that are. A song of tentative, disorienting hope.

"The Roots Beneath Your House" - The Golden Bears, from Wall to Wall

This book could have taken place just about anywhere (it's playing out now in the cities like Rio de Janeiro and Detroit and Los Angeles!). But in the end I put it in Portland, where I live, and so I have the pleasure of calling out Portland bands. My friends The Golden Bears: "When the roots beneath your house come crowning through the floor… lay your body down… and trade your famined thoughts for leaves and vines instead." #portlandband

"Belly of the Cavern" - Typhoon - from Hunger and Thirst

Like this song, Nevel is on a quest, seeking in the earth for some meaning and escape. But instead his solitary quest brings him a new entrance back into the world. #portlandband

"Butter + Toast" - Reggie Watts - from Why S*** So Crazy?

Reggie sings about flapjacks with agave nectar. Also: the mirrors and the mirrors within & stores full of useless shit. Zach, the new nation's strategist, would put this on long repeat, as he wanders through the deep and shallow of country logistics and supplies. "Somebody want a napkin? Too bad, motherf***er, use your sleeve."

"Fables of Faubus" - Charles Mingus

Gregor is a late-sixties retired drug dealer, and the general of the new nation of Sherwood. A man who has weathered incredible storms in his life. At this point, to his growing surprise, he realizes he would do anything for this fledgling nation. Even go up against the National Guard, as this incredible political piece by Mingus speaks to.

"Shame" - Hungry Ghost

Hungry Ghost is another PDX power trio. Let's not beat around the bush: Just about everyone does the wrong thing at some point in her/his life. Major fuckups make major catalysts. Shame never sounded so good. #portlandband

"The New Country" - Marisa Anderson, from Mercury

Yes, we repeat the cycles of history. But revolutions leave the residue of lasting change. My friend Marisa Anderson's intricate, melancholy instrumental aptly finishes us off. #portlandband


Benjamin Parzybok and Sherwood Nation links:

the author's website
the author's Tumblr

Kirkus review

KBOO interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Couch
Late Night Library interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (James Franco on Adapting The Sound and the Fury, An Interview with Owen Pallett, and more)

USA Today shared an excerpt from James Franco's forthcoming book, Hollywood Dreaming: Stories, Pictures, and Poems.

Franco also talked to the Guardian about his film adaptation of Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury.


The Rumpus interviewed musician Owen Pallett.


Bookforum interviewed author Ben Lerner.


Stereogum reconsidered The Notorious BIG's album Ready To Die on its 20th anniversary.


The Guardian listed American novels that should have won the Booker Prize.


The Los Angeles Times mourned the Apple iPod.


Vulture interviewed author Joshua Ferris.


Flavorwire listed the greatest crush songs ever.


The Independent interviewed author David Mitchell.


The A.V. Club suggested entry points into the discography of Queen.


Emma Straub offered novel-writing advice at Rookie.


NPR Music is streaming a recent New Pornographers show.


The New Republic considered the legacy of John Updike's Rabbit novels.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

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Daily Downloads (Caroline Rose, The Judy Blooms, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Caroline Rose: I Will Not Be Afraid Sampler EP [mp3]

The Choir: Shadow Weaver EP [mp3]

Dive Index: "A Person To Hide With" [mp3] from Lost In The Pressure (out September 30th)
Dive Index: "Pattern Pieces" [mp3] from Lost In The Pressure (out September 30th)

Foreign Fields: Little Lover EP [mp3]

The Gray Havens: "Silver" [mp3]

The Judy Blooms: Live on WFMU's Dark Night of the Soul with Julie - September 4, 2014 [mp3]

The Wild After: Lesson Learned EP [mp3]

Work Friend: Slouching album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

White Lung: 2014-09-06, Raleigh [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

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September 11, 2014

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - September 11, 2014

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


The Hospital Suite

The Hospital Suite
by John Porcellino

We’re very excited about this new D+Q book by John Porcellino, and even more excited that he will be here to launch it on September 17th at 7:00 pm! In 1997, John began to have severe stomach pain. He soon found out he needed emergency surgery to remove a benign tumor from his small intestine. In the wake of the surgery, he had numerous health complications that led to a flare-up of his pre-existing tendencies toward anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The Hospital Suite is Porcellino’s response to these experiences—simply told stories drawn in the honest, heart-wrenching style of his much-loved King-Cat mini-comics. His gift for spare yet eloquent candor makes The Hospital Suite an intimate portrayal of one person’s experiences that is also intensely relatable.


Women in Clothes

Women in Clothes
edited by Sheila Heti, Leanne Shapton, Heidi Julavits

We’ve been chomping at the bit all summer for the release of this book, especially since we’re hosting the launch next Tuesday, September 16th at The Rialto Hall! The almighty trifecta of Sheila Heti, Leanne Shapton, Heidi will be in conversation with Fiona Duncan, and then a clothing swap will take place, so make sure to bring along your best old duds so you can participate! (Tickets for the event are ten dollars, or free with a purchase of Women in Clothes and are available at Librairie D+Q.) Through original interviews, conversations, surveys, projects, diagrams and drawings from over six hundred contributors – including Miranda July, Molly Ringwald, Lena Dunham, Sook-Yin Lee, Rachel Kushner, Sarah Nicole Prickett, and Tavi Gevinson – Women in Clothes explores the wide range of motives that inform how women present themselves through clothes, and what style really means.


How to Be Both

How to Be Both
by Ali Smith

Already long-listed for the Man Booker, Ali Smith’s How to be Both is as daring as it is inventive. The book consists of two separate, yet fundamentally interconnected, story arcs. One is focused on a teenage girl named George, who is trying to make sense of her mother’s recent death, while the other follows an actual historical figure - Francesco del Cossa, the Italian renaissance painter. Smith’s big innovation here is that some editions of How to be Both begin with George’s story, while others begin with Francesco’s, so readers experiences of the book will vary, depending on which edition they happen to pick up. Smith’s work challenges the whole notion of binaries – not only in in its unconventional narrative structure, but also in its content.


Stone Mattress

Stone Mattress
by Margaret Atwood

All-things Atwood are beloved around Libraire D+Q, so we’re delighted to get our mitts on Stone Mattress, her latest collection of short tales. Atwood’s cast of characters is wide in scope; though several of the stories feature septuagenarian literary-types as their protagonists, Atwood also revisits the characters from The Robber Bride, and even throws in a werewolf! Sprinkled with a healthy dose of the supernatural, Atwood plays with the short story form, imbuing her mythic tales with her characteristic razor-sharp wit and wry humour.


Polina

Polina
by Bastien Vivès

Long appreciated by francophone readers, Bastien Vivès’ Polina is now available in English for the first time! This visually stunning graphic novel chronicles the life of a young ballet dancer, the titular Polina. When she is accepted at a prestigious Russian ballet school, the legendary (and legendarily difficult) Professor Bojinsky takes her under his wing, and despite his harsh ways, she flourishes under his tutelage. Upon graduation and admittance to a new school, Polina learns that her new ballet teachers disagree with Bojinsky’s methods, and her struggle to adapt leads her to flee Russia for Berlin, where she joins a group of students in creating a new form of theatre. Polina’s journey from girlhood to adulthood is gorgeously rendered in beautiful black and beige illustrations, courtesy of Vivès’ gift for capturing both the human form and human emotion in ink.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Tod Goldberg "Gangsterland"

Gangsterland

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Tod Goldberg's Gangsterland is a clever and compulsively readable comic novel.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"Clearly influenced by the great Elmore Leonard, Goldberg puts his own dry comic spin on the material…Clever plotting, a colorful cast of characters, and priceless situations make this comedic crime novel an instant classic."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Tod Goldberg's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel Gangsterland:


As a teen, I was something of an inveterate mix-tape maker. If you were dating me between 1984-1990, you might still be in possession of one of these tapes and might still have questions concerning why I found so many songs obviously about killing yourself romantic, but you must understand that I didn't know "The Ledge" by the Replacements wasn't about, you know, diving headlong into love, that it wasn't a metaphor for anything. Also, I'm sorry for making all of the B-sides a continuous loop of "I Melt With You." I recognize that might have seemed a tad obsessive.

Fortunately for all involved, I've been married since 1998 and thus I've stopped making mix-tapes for women and complete strangers – I can't tell you how many times I told people I met on vacations, or in the mall, or at drunken frat parties, or who wandered into the record store where I worked, "Dude, give me your address, I'll make you a tape!" – but then Spotify came along and re-awoke in me my primal need to cull music together. I've got something like 100 different playlists, some public, some horribly private (I just can't let the world in to see my playlist consisting entirely of Rick Springfield songs), including one called "What I've Been Listening to While I Write" which I started about six months into writing Gangsterland. The playlist contains roughly two hundred of the most thoroughly depressing songs ever recorded, including "Depression" by The Dead Tongues, one George Michael song, one Neil Diamond song (more on that in a moment), nine Replacements songs, one song about rewriting ("Rewrite" by Paul Simon), and one song that I don't think I've ever liked, "Ashes to Ashes" by Faith No More, that I can only imagine I put on by mistake when looking for the David Bowie song of the same name.

I'd go through periods where I added songs to the list and then long stretches when I wouldn't, because I was busy making other playlists, like "Drunk Songs" or, for a nice change, "The Most Depressing Songs Ever," which I would also listen to on constant repeat while I wrote. (My wife, bless her, probably has a playlist of her own on Spotify called "Songs I Hate That Tod Played 50,000 Times While Writing That Damn Book For Two and a Half Years.")

Of those two hundred songs, only a few have really anything to do with the book itself, apart from putting me into the particular mood I needed to be in while writing (contemplative, hopeless, etc.), which is different than the moods my characters needed to be in, since most of my characters spend the course of the book in a highly agitated or murderous state, and if I'm in a highly agitated or murderous state I find it hard to write fiction. (Highly caffeinated is fine. Highly agitated and murderous I just want to write essays about how my parents screwed me up.) So there's only a few crossovers here…which makes me think I should do a playlist of crossover hits…At any rate, as this is a book about the Mafia, and about Jews, and about the FBI, and about Las Vegas, and about Chicago, a lot of the songs that would be appropriate for your listening enjoyment might seem a little odd, which is to say: A lot of songs about guns.

"Man With A Gun" by Jerry Harrison: These lyrics pretty much encapsulate everything I've ever written: Pretty girl young man old man/Man with a gun/Two people in love/The rules do not apply/To people in love. In the case of Gangsterland, specifically, however, it was also the challenge I kept in my head with creating the character of Sal Cupertine, a Chicago Mafia hitman who takes on the persona of Rabbi David Cohen, a rabbi at a thriving temple in Las Vegas: How do I make a killer empathetic? And I kept coming back to Jerry Harrison's edict: for a man with a gun, or people in love, the rules do not apply. I've long thought that this song would end up as the theme to a TV show (it did appear in the film Something Wild a million years ago)…maybe it will just be the one that plays in my head.

"Brilliant Disguise" by Bruce Springsteen. Bruce Springsteen plays a role (or his songs do, anyway) in the book rather directly, a plot point I won't divulge here, but of all his songs, this one is actually my favorite, both for what it's about – the dawning realization that the person you've married is not the person you thought you married and that we all have different selves – and then for something I heard Springsteen say about the song years later, which is that it means something different to him now when he sings it with someone he loves (namely his current wife) and that meaning changes. That stuck with me. There's much to do in Gangsterland about meaning changing and how one lives inside a new identity, even when your true self is fighting (a bit literally, in this case) to get out.

"Longfellow Serenade" by Neil Diamond. One of the great mysteries of Judaism is Neil Diamond. As a people, even if we don't like Neil Diamond's music, Jews are nevertheless required to know many of his songs and be able to sing them at any moment. It's actually in the Talmud. As your average pork-eating Jew, I was raised on a steady diet of Mr. Diamond's work (to say nothing of Barbra Streisand) and I am unabashedly a fan. I've long imagined that one of the hardest things about converting to Judaism would be the wholesale embracing one must do of Mr. Diamond, because if you're not raised on him I imagine he can seem…you know…not good, which I touch on some in Gangsterland. (I would have touched on it even more, but my editor thought that my constant and unremitting series of Neil Diamond jokes weren't as funny as I did…alas…one day I'll put out a director's cut consisting solely of my super-funny asides about The Jazz Singer.) Of course, no one on planet Earth is unaware of "Sweet Caroline" and I might suggest that a good sum of the world has even encountered the existential conundrum that is Mr. Diamond singing Christmas songs, so I thought it would be good to pick more of a deep track, as it were (it was a big hit in 1974, when I was three, which means I've been singing this song to myself for forty damn years), but one which also so happens to show up in the book. I've always been drawn to story songs and in this one Neil sings about a man who woos a woman by reciting Longfellow to her, which is weird since Longfellow wasn't exactly a romantic – I have a hard time imagining anyone falling in love with a person after having them read "The Song of Hiwatha" or "Paul Revere's Ride" aloud – and yet I've always quite admired this tune. But more importantly, one of Longfellow's finest poems – and another one that I can't imagine serenading a person with – is "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport," which comes to play a minor role in the book, too.

"Sin City" by Uncle Tupelo. This is actually a cover of an old Flying Burrito Brothers song, and it's not even about Las Vegas, it's about Los Angeles, but I've always associated it with Las Vegas for the obvious reasons of the title and also for the opening lines: This old town is filled with sin it'll swallow you in/If you've got some money to burn/Take it home right away, you've got three years to pay/But Satan is waiting his turn. The song also sounds like a spiritual, a reckoning with a God you might not believe in, but who you don't want to piss off regardless.

"Checkout Time in Vegas" by Drive-By Truckers. The opening lines of this great ode to bad luck could be a novel in itself: A bloody nose, empty pockets, a rented car with a trunk full of guns/It ain't true that the sun don't rise in Vegas/I've seen it once…Part of my goal in writing Gangsterland was an attempt to capture Las Vegas without ever going to the Strip, and to deal with the idea that all kinds of people come to town to change their luck, not just gamblers, so sometimes that means they end up in the suburbs selling real estate, a con in itself. The gangster culture the city was built upon permeates every aspect of life and the ideas the Truckers espouse here, that you might be the guy rolling out of town covered in blood, with a trunk full of guns, is one I deeply admire.

"Relatively Easy" by Jason Isbell. I could probably just put the collected works of Jason Isbell down on this list and be done with it, but this song in particular, where he says I broke the law boys/ Shooting out the windows of my loft boys/ When they picked me I made a big noise/ Everything to blame except my mind kept ringing in my head as I was working on the last third of the book. The idea that when we make bad decisions the first place we look is invariably outside of ourselves, when we probably should be examining our own minds, is something that, as I've grown older, has become more and more apparent. It's particularly relevant to the characters in the book, many of whom are stuck in corrupt systems that they initially think have nothing to do with their own doings, that all of their actions are beyond their control.

"So You Want To Be A Gangster" by Too $hort. Some wise words from Too $hort: You got it all wrong/Gangsters don't live that long. I'm no sociologist, but this just seems like a very smart assessment regarding the life expectancy of those who choose to go into the murder business.

"1%" by Jane's Addiction. True fact: I appear, for about a millisecond, in the video for Jane's Addiction's "Stop" – if you pause the video at exactly forty-nine seconds in, you'll see me above Dave Navarro's guitar, wearing a blue Steussy mock-turtleneck (it was the 90s, people). At any rate, "1%" is a song I've loved since prior to my mock-turtleneck phase. I used to chant the chorus – The gang/ And the government/No different – from the mosh pit, feeling like I was experiencing come great truth. I recognize now that the perception of great truths are more easily discovered when one is drunk on Mickey's and have been punched in the face over and over again in the middle of a swirl pit, but nevertheless this song was on heavy rotation as I wrote about the shades of difference between the gang and the government.

"Short Change Hero" by The Heavy. Every single scene in this book that collapses time, features a murder, and speeds by on the page? This song is playing in the background. It's the perfect anti-hero theme song, really, with its repeating chorus of This ain't no place for no hero/ This ain't no place for no better man, even though part of the truth of this book (or at least my attempts at truth) is that no one kills someone and gets away with it emotionally untouched, unless they're actual psychopaths.

"Partners in Crime" by Lucinda Williams. A cover of an old Slim Dunlap song, it's probably not literally about being criminals, but it's a boozy barroom ode to finding kinship of the dubious sort, blowing out of town, and not letting anyone take you out alive. Like Jason Isbell, I could also just list every single song Lucinda Williams has ever recorded here and it would be an accurate soundtrack. In fact…

"Are You Alright?" by Lucinda Williams. This plaintive song about a person who has disappeared, both literally and emotionally, could play on a loop through Gangsterland's prologue and epilogue, setting up both the specific circumstances of the novel's beginning and the peculiar circumstances of the novel's end. Lucinda Williams is one of my favorite singer/songwriters and this song is one I return to time and again to put me in the mood to write, a simple song about loss that takes the listener into the haunted part of the heart.

"Looking Down the Barrel Of A Gun" the Beastie Boys. I'm mad at my desk and I'm writing all curse words. That's about the size of it right there.


Tod Goldberg and Gangsterland links:

the author's website
the author's blog
the author's Wikipedia page

Kirkus review
Los Angeles Magazine review
Publishers Weekly review

Palm Springs Life interview with the author
The Rumpus interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (An Interview with David Mitchell, The US Open as Music, and more)

Hazlitt interviewed author David Mitchell.


LCD Soundsystem's James Murphy has turned the data from the US Open into electronic music.


Author Dylan Landis interviewed herself at The Nervous Breakdown.


Bookworm interviewed author Joyce Carol Oates.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Joseph O'Neill.


Flavorwire listed the bad poets in pop culture.


The Poetry Book Society has released its list of "next generation poets."


The 2014 Mercury music prize nominees have been named.


The Seattle Times previewed fall's new books.


All Things Considered profiled Nonesuch Records on the label's 50th anniversary.


NPR Books shared an excerpt from Eimear McBride's debut novel A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing.


Drowned in Sound interviewed composer Olafur Arnulds.


The Paris Review interviewed essayist Richard Rodriguez.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Daily Downloads (Grouper, Eyelids, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Attic Wolves: Volume and Boldness EP [mp3]

Grammar: "New World" [mp3] from Grammar (out October 14th)

Eyelids: "Seagulls into Submission" [mp3]
Eyelids: "Psyche #1" [mp3]

Great Caesar: Scattered Air EP [mp3]

Grouper: "Call Across Rooms" [mp3] from Ruins (out October 13th)

Julian Lage and Chris Eldridge: Close to Picture EP [mp3]

Sammy Brue: Bootleg Sessions Vol. 1 EP [mp3]

Twin Oaks: The Frontloader Acoustic Session EP [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Little Black Egg Band: 2014-09-05, Raleigh [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

September 10, 2014

Book Notes - Jess Row "Your Face in Mine"

Your Face in Mine

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jess Row's debut novel Your Face in Mine one of the year's most provocative books, one that boldly explores themes of race and identity in America.

The New York Times wrote of the book:

"This book is adult in its weight and complexity, and formidable in its thoughtfulness... [Row] doesn't shy away from the hard intellectual and moral questions his story raises, or from grainy philosophical dialogue, but he submerges these things in a narrative that burns with a steady flame. You turn the pages without being aware you are turning them."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Jess Row's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel Your Face in Mine:


Your Face in Mine is a novel built around certain pieces of music, so of course I have to start with them: Bob Marley, "Exodus," Public Enemy, "Fight the Power," and Miles Davis, Porgy and Bess (the entire album).

"Exodus" is the song that gives Martin Wilkinson—the character in the novel who starts out life as a white, Jewish kid in Baltimore and in his twenties is transformed, through surgery, into an African American man—the inspiration for his journey to blackness. Obviously it's a song about the Rasta Exodus, about movement, about yearning to return to Zion, to Africa, literally (depending on which Rastas you're talking to) to Ethiopia, the home of Haile Selassie. But the Exodus in the song is also an immanent, continuous, psychological process of freeing oneself from the values of Babylon and identifying with the values of a new homeland, which may exist purely in the mind. I think that's part of why Rastafarianism, which began as a very small, esoteric, new religion, has taken on worldwide appeal, even to many people not of African descent: it recasts the central event of the Hebrew Bible, one of the central narratives of Western civilization, as a mental revolution against Western civilization. If you listen to "Exodus," I think, you can't help but feel a sense of that whole symbolic order being undone in a joyful way.

"Fight the Power," of course, is the song that opens Do The Right Thing, which was a transformative moment for Kelly, the white narrator of the book, who saw Do The Right Thing at age thirteen, just like I did.

Porgy and Bess is one of Miles Davis's collaborations with the great composer, arranger, and pianist Gil Evans (another is the album Sketches of Spain). There's a great compilation album Columbia put out, The Best of Miles Davis and Gil Evans, which gives you a sense of the variety of music they produced together. Porgy and Bess itself is one of the richest and most complicated examples of American art about black people but written by a white man, and then layered on top of that you have the Davis-Evans collaboration, between a white arranger and perhaps the greatest black musician of the twentieth century, so you couldn't ask for a work that has a clearer transracial pedigree than Porgy and Bess. But I chose it for a particular moment in the novel because the music is extremely thoughtful and slow, and the orchestration is almost unbearably heavy, all these layers of horns on the low end. You can hear each of the instruments clearly, and the effect is that it just stops you in your tracks and forces you to listen. Gershwin's compositions are complicated enough, but Evans and Davis push them in the direction of European, post-WWII, new music. You hear the presence of all these different cultures and trajectories right there in the score.

Another song that is pivotal in the book is the Fugazi song "Styrofoam" from their first full album, Repeater, released in 1990. This takes place at the moment of the LA riots in 1992, which was a time when the line, "We are all bigots, filled with hatred," really came home to me. "Syrofoam" was the one song quoted in the novel that I need to get permission to republish, and I was very grateful, though not surprised, that Dischord Records (unlike most copyright holders) allowed me to do so for free.

The years that I spent writing Your Face in Mine were years in which I was discovering a lot of indie or underground hip hop—a scene I only followed very loosely before about 2008. When not writing (because I can't write listening to music with vocals) I listened constantly to: El-P, Danger Doom, the Roots, Sage Francis, Shabazz Palaces, Mos Def and Talib Kweli, Action Bronson, Killer Mike. And on and on. I was hugely affected by watching Dave Chappelle's Block Party, one of the most joyful and large-hearted concert movies ever made.

While writing I spent almost all of my time listening to jazz, mostly piano and guitar trios. Jim Hall, who died earlier this year, is perhaps my favorite of all jazz guitarists, and his albums were on constant rotation: Jim Hall Live!, It's Nice To Be With You, Intermodulation, Intercontinental, plus his duo albums with Ron Carter, his many albums with Paul Desmond, and his recordings from the years that he played with Sonny Rollins, particularly The Bridge. As always, I also spend much of my time listening to Keith Jarrett. Jarrett's playing embraces the whole range of improvisational music and American music; it can be non-linear and jagged or gospel-like and joyful, and yet somehow you always know it's him. (Even without the kazoo-like noises he makes, which drive some people crazy). He's also a player who embodies the racial ambiguity, and anxiety, of jazz history, which was much on my mind as I wrote Your Face in Mine, though it doesn't enter into the novel directly. After reading Jeffrey Renard Allen's new novel Song of the Shank, I've been wishing I could write a novel about one of the great lost figures in jazz history—Albert Ayler, for example.

Someday.


Jess Row and Your Face in Mine links:

the author's website

Los Angeles Times review
Miami Herald review
Minneapolis Star Tribune review
New York Times review
New York Times review
Publishers Weekly review
San Francisco Chronicle review
St. Louis Post-Dispatch review

BookPage interview with the author
New York Times profile of the author
Weekend Edition interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Christos Tsiolkas "Barracuda"

Barracuda

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Myla Goldberg, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Christos Tsiolkas's Barracuda is a profound and marvelously dark novel.

Library Journal wrote of the book:

"This disturbing yet satisfying story by Commonwealth Prize winner Tsiolkas (The Slap) examines themes of class consciousness, family conflict, loyalty, and friendship. The often harsh, sometimes brutal novel about the fine line between love and hate, pain and pleasure, is infused with language so beautiful that it takes one's breath away."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In his own words, here is Christos Tsiolkas's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Barracuda:


The joy of music has always been in my life. My mother recalls that as a young infant I would find my way into the recess of their brand new three-in-one stereo and curl myself up next to the turntable so I would be closer to the music. The music I first heard as a child were the Greek laika (popular) songs that both my parents loved to sing. And, of course, there was Elvis Presley, the one non-Greek singer whose music found its way into our home.

Later, as a young kid, I was also seduced by the pleasure of disco, how it was impossible to simply sit still and listen to the music, that one's body had to become part of the listening experience. A few years later, as an adolescent, punk rock and the dissonant electronic proto-minimalism of New Wave expressed all that confused, rage and questioning that I was unable to put in words. But I never lost my love for dance music. I was fortunate in my early twenties to move into a shared household with a young woman from New Jersey who had fled Reagan's America. She introduced me to hip-hop (and I have never looked back) and also made me really listen to Bruce Springsteen (haven't looked back from him either).

The early eighties were a good time for a music freak to come to adulthood in Melbourne, Australia. Punk and post-punk flourished in the inner-city pubs, and great community radio stations started up, neither private nor state-controlled, funded entirely by subscription, that played every type of music imaginable. Volunteer DJs would spin a dream soundtrack that would move from Nina Simone to The Slits to Patti Smith to New Order to Curtis Mayfield to Grandmaster Flash to Ike & Tina Turner to Miles Davis and back to Nina Simone, often in the same hour. I still love radio, and in Melbourne I have a regular Tuesday night gig on 3RRR, a community radio station, where along with two friends, I get the chance to play music and discuss music for two wonderful, indulgent, pure hours. That gig is an oasis of peace in my week.

I can't live without music but when I am writing I find it distracting to listen to singing. Possibly because as a writer one of my tools is language, I prefer not to have lyrics interfere with my own work. And anyway, I have an enormous store of verse-chorus-verse in my memory that I can draw on whenever I need. I came late to jazz and to classical music but increasingly those two genres form the soundtrack to the actual physical labour of writing: they typing and the scrawl of words on a blank page. When writing my new novel, Barracuda, I was rediscovering the great jazz album, "A Night in Tunisia", by Art Blakey and the Messengers. I had also just read Alex Ross's wonderful, literate, and fun introduction to 20th century classical music, The Rest is Noise, and his writing introduced me to the melancholic sweeping romanticism of Sibelius. I hope some of the diligent exuberance of Art Blakely found its way in the descriptions of swimming in Barracuda (of how you have to really work to soar so effortlessly); and I hope that if there is a sad tenderness in the book, it came from being immersed in the soundscapes of the great Finish composer.

The main character in Barracuda is Danny Kelly, a working-class kid with an astonishing talent as a swimmer. He will dream of Olympic gold and that dream with break him. Understanding that failure, remaking himself, is hopefully what makes him a good man. From the outset I knew I wanted his parents to be lovers of music, rockabilly aficionados who love early rock and roll, who adore rhythm and blues. Danny's house is filled with music. Etta James' "I'd Rather Go Blind" is their song, and it was such a pleasure to find a place for it in the book. It is a song I have listened to a thousand times and I hope it will be a song I am listening to at my end. I have countless version of James' singing that song, various bootlegs and live versions, but it is the Chess original that is still my favourite. I can't work out its magic, how it is both controlled and abandoned, how it is vulnerable and defiant, all at the same time. I love too that it seems so effortless, that it makes me swoon every time it is on. It is the best vocal performance ever recorded and I'll swear to that right to my end.

Danny gets a scholarship to a rich private school and in that new world he feels a despised interloper. I was searching for a moment that would encapsulate how much of an outsider he feels. In the early nineties I was living in Perth, Western Australia, the most isolated city on earth. The day we heard of Kurt Cobain's suicide, the whole city seemed to have found its way into the city centre. There was a busker singing "Smells Like Teen Spirit" acapella. A circle formed around him: there were white kids, Aboriginal kids, two old drunk men, there was a group of musicians loading their gear after a gig. Perth was a city divided by ugly racism and class distinctions but on this night we all sung along with the busker at the top of our lungs. The Nirvana song forms part of a pivotal moment early in the book where the young Danny can't admit to his love for the band to his school-friends: he doesn't trust them, can't understand their codes and behaviour, and so feels he will betray something if he reveals the extent of his love for Nirvana. That band is one connection he has to the working-class world he knows he has now left behind. In a sense I was reversing that precious and rare moment of unity that I experienced in Perth the night that Cobain died. It seemed right that in not allowing Danny to feel connection in that moment I could convey something of the depth of this young boy's alienation.

Barracuda is not really about whether Danny Kelly does or does not become an Olympic swimming champion. Right from the beginning of the book we know that he never succeeds. In the course of his being broken by that failure, Danny commits a violent and ugly act. The book is about how he finds a way to genuinely make atonement for such ugliness. The chapter of his undoing all takes place over the night of the opening ceremony of the 2000 Sydney Olympics, a night I remember vividly: it felt as if the whole country was participating in one big party. That year, A Guy Called Gerald had released an intoxicating and chilling house track, "Fever (Or a Flame)." Like the best of house music it is constructed through a few simple elements – a gently propulsive and repetitive bass track, a recurrent snatch of vocal, a snaking and elusive melody that you never can quite catch hold of, it always feels like it is just out of reach. The force of the track begins in the stomach, invades one's body and as you dance to it you feel like you are chasing it, that the music is always one step ahead of you. It seemed the absolute right track to soundtrack Danny's nightmarish descent on that night. I still love the danger of that track.

Danny is a character who is scared and suspicious of words; my work was in trying to give expression to a character that is inarticulate. This is why music forms an important subterranean layer to the novel, and why it was crucial that his parents love music. The emotions expressed through a shared love of music can sometimes articulate all those things that we find impossible to put in words. In the book, Danny and his mother undertake a road trip from Melbourne to Adelaide. Part of the conversation between them is written through the music they listen to. On that trip they hear that Nina Simone has passed away. The love that is strong and unshakeable in Danny's family can't save him from the nightmare he makes of his life: that is part of the challenge and difficulty of love, that even having it there are always those moments we must face on our own. But the love is nevertheless real and sustaining. Their shared sadness in Nina Simone passing away is part of that love.

The joy of music will always be a part of my life.


Christos Tsiolkas and Barracuda links:

the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

Financial Times review
Guardian review
Kirkus review
The Monthly review
Sydney Morning Herald review
Telegraph review
Toronto Star review

Guardian profile of the author
Independent profile of the author
Time Out Sydney interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

WORD Bookstores Books of the Week - September 10, 2014

In the Largehearted Word series, the staff of Brooklyn's WORD bookstore highlights several new books released this week.

WORD Bookstores are independent neighborhood bookstores in Greenpoint, Brooklyn and Jersey City, New Jersey. Our primary goal is to be whatever our communities needs us to be, which currently means carrying everything from fiction to nonfiction to absurdly cute cards and stationery. In addition, we're fiends for a good event, from the classic author reading and Q&A to potlucks and a basketball league (and anything set in a bar). If a weekly dose of WORD here isn't enough for you, follow us on Twitter: @wordbookstores.


Women in Clothes

Women in Clothes
edited by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits, and Leanne Shapton

This compendium of stories, photos, illustrations, surveys, and so much more celebrates, examines, and illuminates women and their relationship to clothes -- a simple-seeming premise that comprises a vast, complex, and moving wealth of histories and voices.


Station Eleven

Station Eleven
by Emily St. John Mandel

A post-apocalyptic saga of love, art, and survival, this novel establishes Emily St. John Mandel as mainstay of contemporary storytelling.


Dataclysm

Dataclysm
by Christian Rudder

Subtitled Who We Are (When We Think No One's Looking), this ranging social analysis by OKCupid co-founder Christian Rudder uses exhaustive data and creative perspectives to evince what makes us unique through what we have in common.


A Little Lumpen Novelita

A Little Lumpen Novelita
by Roberto Bolano

One of the Chilean masters final works, this brief story delivers the full heft of Bolano's mystical noir.


WORD Brooklyn links:

WORD website
WORD Tumblr
WORD on Twitter
WORD's Facebook page
WORD's Flickr photos


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics & graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (An Excerpt from John Darnielle's New Novel, The New U2 Album Free at iTunes, and more)

io9 shared an excerpt from John Darnielle's new novel Wolf in White Van.


The new U2 album is available for free to iTunes customers.


The Nervous Breakdown shared an excerpt from Dylan Landis's novel Rainey Royal.


John Cheever's daughter toured the author's home at the New Yorker.


Steve Albini broke down the new Shellac album track-by-track at Exclaim.


Author Christine Sneed discussed book dedications at the Chicago Tribune.


The Oxford American interviewed singer-songwriter Sturgill Simpson.


Stephen Burt read all 93 33 1/3 books on seminal albums for Slate, then listed the best.


Glass Animals visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


The Atlantic interviewed Stephen King about teaching writing.


The Record reviewed the newly remastered mono recordings of the Beatles.


The Times-Picayune previewed fall and winter music books.


Noisey is streaming the new Generationals album, Alix.


Flavorwire recommended experimental novels.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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