April 21, 2016

Shorties (A Charlotte Bronte Primer, PJ Harvey's Albums Ranked, and more)

Signature shared a primer to the works by and about Charlotte Bronte.

The Yorkshire of the Bronte sisters.


Stereogum ranked PJ Harvey's albums.


The Stranger interviewed cartoonist Simon Hanselmann.


Stream a new Colleen Green song.


The Rumpus Book Club interviewed author Zoe Zolbrod.


NPR Music is streaming the new Jayhawks album Paging Mr. Proust.


Work in Progress shared a primer of Cuban poetry.


Stream Holly Miranda's cover of Bon Iver's "Blood Bank."


The new issue of Granta, featuring Irish writing, features new short fiction by Kevin Barry and Belinda McKeon.


NPR Music is streaming the new King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard album Nonagon Infinity.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Deborah Lutz's book The Bronte Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects.


American Songwriter interviewed Into It. Over It.’s Evan Weiss.


Inside Merle Haggard's final years.


Michelle Hoover discussed her novel Bottomland with Iowa Public Radio.


MOJO listed the best albums of 2016 so far.


Bookworm interviewed Helen Macdonald about her book H Is for Hawk.


Author Elizabeth Hand listed her favorite books about music at Paste.


The Miami Herald previewed May's best new books.


Drowned in Sound shared an excerpt from David Critchley's book On Bowie.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Eight Hundred Grapes by Laura Dave
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell
J.D. Salinger: The Escape Artist by Thomas Beller
A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash
The Lost Tribe of Coney Island by Claire Prentiss
Shakespeare: The World as a Stage by Bill Bryson
South on Highland by Liana Maeby
The Time Is Noon by Pearl Buck



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

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April 20, 2016

Book Notes - Dominic Smith "The Last Painting of Sara de Vos"

The Last Painting of Sara de Vos

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Dominic Smith's novel The Last Painting of Sara de Vosis a captivating art world epic that spans continents and centuries.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"Smith’s latest novel is a rich and detailed story that connects a 17th-century Dutch painting to its 20th-century American owner and the lonely but fervent art student who makes the life-changing decision to forge it. This is a beautiful, patient, and timeless book, one that builds upon centuries and shows how the smallest choices—like the chosen mix for yellow paint—can be the definitive markings of an entire life."


In his own words, here is Dominic Smith's Book Notes music playlist for his novel The Last Painting of Sara de Vos:


At the center of my new novel, The Last Painting of Sara de Vos, is a rare 17th-century Dutch landscape. We follow it through time, looking at the way it changes the course of three different lives, in three different centuries. We see the circumstances under which Sara de Vos paints it in 1630s Amsterdam, and the 1950s life of the wealthy Manhattan lawyer who inherits the painting, then has it stolen. We also witness half a century in the life of an Australian art historian who was paid to make a copy of the landscape in her twenties. Now, in 2000, in the prime of her illustrious career, both her forgery and the original show up for a Sydney exhibition she's curating on Dutch woman painters of the Golden Age.

If there is a soundtrack to this novel, it contains three musical movements, from three different continents and time periods: European baroque music, 1950s American jazz, and Australian contemporary music. The first two are obviously iconic and brimming with classics. The last one is lesser known, perhaps, but there are some gems lurking there just the same.

ACT I: The Golden Age

Giovanni Pandolfi's Sonata Op. 3, No. 1, La Stella

While the Dutch Golden Age sparked a deluge of prolific painters, the same can't be said for classical composers. There aren't really any Golden Age Dutch composers to rival the Germans or the Italians. Nonetheless, music was everywhere in 17th-century Holland—in taverns and music halls, and in the music rooms of the wealthy.

And we see musical themes in the paintings of artists like Vermeer, Rembrandt, Judith Leyster, and Jan Steen. What I like about the Italian composer Pandolfi is that he was largely lost for a few centuries before being rediscovered. This is exactly what happened to Judith Leyster, one of the first women painters to be admitted to a Guild of St. Luke.

Pinksterliedje – "Song of the Whitsun Flower"

While the wealthy might have been listening to a Pandolfi recital in a canal house, the poorer classes were more likely to be dancing and singing along to folk music in the taverns. Instead of the harpsichord, you were more likely to hear bagpipes, fiddles, the hurdy-gurdy and lots of clapping and foot stomping. Your average rabble-rouser knew dozens of songs and dances by rote.


PART II: The Sound of Jazz

Charlie Parker's "Koko"
One of my main characters, Marty de Groot, is a jazz enthusiast who regularly goes out to a basement club in Manhattan of the 1950s. He recalls seeing Charlie Parker play in an earlier time and regrets that he abandoned the trumpet in high school, that he never explored his own musical potential. This tune is shifting and unpredictable, just like Marty de Groot's life after he discovers that someone has swapped out the iconic landscape painting above his bed with a meticulous fake. Gary Giddins, who wrote a book celebrating Parker, said of this tune: “It's like a ping-pong ball being blown by a fan in a very small room, where he changes the accents on every measure, on every phrase.” The same could be said for this period of Marty de Groot's life.

John Coltrane's "Giant Steps"
Recorded in 1959 but released in 1960 on an album of the same name, this jazz tune feels like it ends one era and begins another. It's a study in change and progression. By the end of the 1950s, two of my characters, Marty de Groot and Ellie Shipley, have burned certain bridges with the past but they're also tied to it in a deep and abiding way. Jazz has always felt like that to me—something new emerges but it is inextricably tied to what's come before.


PART III: The Antipodes

Paul Kelly's "Before Too Long"
This is nominally a love song, but I've always found something unsettling in the lyrics: Before too long/He who is nothing/Will suddenly come into view. When Ellie Shipley's past comes back to haunt her in Sydney in 2000—as the city embraces the world stage with the Olympics—it's like a wrecking ball coming through the side of a house.

Hoodoo Gurus' "What's My Scene"
When I was in high school in Sydney during the late 1980s, this song hit the charts. There's a line that perfectly evokes Ellie Shipley's fundamental dilemma throughout her life—I've been caught in someone else's scene (but that's not me). She's someone who's never quite found where she fits in, whether in New York, London or Sydney. That restlessness and searching quality is a core part of her character. I also love the fact that this song has two different choruses—a stylistic flourish that Ellie would appreciate given her training as an artist and historian.


Dominic Smith and The Last Painting of Sara de Vos links:

the author's website

The Australian review
Booklist review
Boston Globe review
Dallas Morning News review
Kirkus review
Washington Post review

Chicago Tribune interview with the author
Paris Review essay by the author
Publishers Weekly review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Book Notes - Alex Segura "Down the Darkest Street"

Down the Darkest Street

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Alex Segura's new novel Down the Darkest Street is a gritty and compelling follow-up to his debut Silent City.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Segura (has) an edgy storytelling style, snappy dialogue, and a cast of salty characters."


In his own words, here is Alex Segura's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Down the Darkest Street:


Second novels are a lot like sophomore albums. After pulling out all the stops for the first - in the case of bands, touring, writing songs and recording - you're instantly expected to create a second work, minus the years to build up to it. It poses an interesting and daunting creative challenge. Not everyone survives it, band or writer.

I spent years writing and revising the debut Pete Fernandez mystery, Silent City. It was an exhausting, exhilarating, and intense learning experience, and by the time I was done, I felt as if I'd poured my insides onto the printed page. Even then, I knew the sequel had to do more.

Sequels, for me, work when they're denser, darker, and more personal than the original work. While Silent City introduced us to Miami protagonist Pete Fernandez and his myriad problems, I wanted the sequel to double down on the dangers - to show that things like alcoholism and failed relationships don't just disappear because the bad guy has been vanquished. In Down the Darkest Street, as Pete and his partner face off against a deadly killer, Pete must also look at himself in the mirror and try to figure out what to do with the battered life that he is left with after Silent City.

The music I listened to while working on this book was also moody and personal. Here are some songs that I found myself listening to again and again definitely while the book was born in my head, as I fleshed out its characters and the challenges I was going to put Pete through this time.

"Shipbuilding" by Elvis Costello & The Attractions
Costello's working class ballad broods from its opening, jagged piano chords to the somber sax solo that closes his melancholy ode to shipyard workers. The song evokes a meandering, foggy feeling - like sleeping in but still coming to with a lingering hangover. Something Pete experiences more often than not in the early stages of Down the Darkest Street.

"Lazarus" by David Byrne and St. Vincent
The idea of rebirth and rising from the water flows throughout this song, starting with the title and past the St. Vincent-sung "Hey, hey, Lazarus" refrain. Thumping, funky, with a tinge of menace, yet remarkably heartfelt, the tune shimmies and dips unpredictably, optimistic, but also very afraid, hesitant, but hopeful.

"Remember" by Harry Nilsson
Down the Darkest Street is about facing your past and battling the demons that linger there - and if you listen to this song with that in mind, you can probably tell why it stood out to me. It even makes a notable appearance early on in the novel. The music is haunting, sparse, and almost nihilistic--Nilsson sings as if he were perched on a barstool, his whiskey-coated voice longing for a past that might never have been.

"You Turn Me On" by Beat Happening
The bottom-heavy, throaty, and simplistic title track from Beat Happening's fifth album has the right mix of lusty and dangerous, but it's the repeated "turn me on, dead man" chorus that ups the sense of foreboding, making it a perfect mood-setter for a book about a serial killer and his lo-fi, private-eye nemesis.

"Revelator" by Gillian Welch
Gillian Welch could sing along to craigslist ads and I'd listen, but she doesn't -- she sings plaintive, bare songs like this one. The kind that stick with you for days. At times defeated, at times uplifting, the song grows older with each listen, its narrator a world-weary messenger struggling to take another step.

"B.M.F.A." by Martha Wainwright
An unfiltered, harsh and defiant breakup song that builds to an unexpectedly harsh (but fulfilling) crescendo, Wainwright's "B.M.F.A." (listen to figure out the acronym) doesn't mince words. The desperate, angry and despondent vocals pair perfectly with Wainwright's guitar and a sparse accompaniment to create the kind of song you play for someone you never plan to see again, or want to.

"Elephant" by Jason Isbell
You find a special kind of darkness and despair at the bottom of a glass in an empty bar, and a special kind of crowd that gathers around you near closing time. Isbell captures that muted, resigned feeling with this heart wrenching ballad, telling a tale of two lives crashing into their respective bottoms, but falling side-by-side for a short time. A song thick with sadness and hopelessness that you can't help but wallow in, too.


Alex Segura and Down the Darkest Street links:

the author's website
video trailer for the book

amNewYork interview with the author
Guardian profile of the author
Huffington Post interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for Silent City
Newsarama interview with the author
Washington Post profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (George Saunders on His Debut Novel, Andy Partridge's New Book Reviewed, and more)

Vulture interviewed George Saunders about his debut novel Lincoln in the Bardo.


Browbeat reviewed Andy Partridge's new book, Complicated Game: Inside the Songs of XTC.


Publishers Weekly previewed summer's best new books.


Julianna Barwick discussed her favorite albums at The Quietus.


The Literary Hub podcast interviewed author Karl Ove Knausgaard.


Paste profiled singer-songwriter Margo Price.


Signature recommended film and television adaptations of Shakespeare's plays.


NPR Music shared a Mountain Stage set by Josh Ritter.


Car Seat Headrest covered Radiohead's "Pyramid Song."


Electric Literature recommended Gothic gems of historical fiction.


Morning Edition profiled the band Woods.


The Portland Press Herald interviewed Elizabeth Hand about her new novel Hard Light.


A Course in Dying interviewed author Warren Ellis.


Paste profiled singer-songwriter Thao Nguyen.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed Molly Prentiss about her novel Tuesday Nights in 1980.


The A.V. Club interviewed the music supervisor of the television series Girls.


Cocktails inspired by the writing of Roald Dahl.


Stream a new song by Neko Case, k.d. lang, and Laura Veirs.


Kim Brooks and Ethan Canin discussed writing and their new novels at Salon.


Andrew Bird visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


The 2016 Eisner Awards finalists have been announced, and the list features a record number of women.


The Guardian reconsidered Mary Margaret O'Hara's 1988 album Miss America.


David Duchovny discussed his new novel Bucky F*cking Dent with Fresh Air.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Eight Hundred Grapes by Laura Dave
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell
J.D. Salinger: The Escape Artist by Thomas Beller
A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash
The Lost Tribe of Coney Island by Claire Prentiss
Shakespeare: The World as a Stage by Bill Bryson
South on Highland by Liana Maeby
The Time Is Noon by Pearl Buck



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 19, 2016

Book Notes - Jonathan Levi "Septimania"

Septimania

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jonathan Levi's novel Septimania is an ambitious and imaginative epic.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"[L]aced with philosophy and wit. A thoroughly intellectual postmodern fable, wise yet melancholy, meant to be read slowly and savored."


In his own words, here is Jonathan Levi's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Septimania:


"Pictures at an Exhibition" by Emerson, Lake, and Palmer

Septimania opens in the organ loft of a Norman church outside Cambridge, England, where my hero, Malory, loses his heart and his virginity to a dyslexic math genius named Louiza. While Malory's repertoire tends more to Bach's famous "Toccata and Fugue", the year is 1978 and the airwaves are redolent with the patchouli of another Bachanalia, Procul Harum's "A Whiter Shade of Pale". I grew up playing the violin. Bach was god. But with a father who sang Hank Williams and friends who played Frank Zappa, musical monotheism was not an option. My first concert at the Fillmore East in 1972 featured one of the organ heroes of the 70s, the bare-chested, big-haired (and sadly, recently departed) Keith Emerson of Emerson, Lake, and Palmer, who unified the classical and the rock world with his two-fisted rendition of Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition.

"Watching the Detectives" by Elvis Costello

Much of the inspiration for Septimania came from my own experience as a student at Clare College, Cambridge in the late 70s. June 12, 1978 found me crashing the Trinity College May Ball with the girl who inspired Louiza. We snuck in via the river, easier than braving the porters by the main entrance next to the rooms where Malory, and before him his scientific muse Isaac Newton lived. The main band at the Ball was called The Attractions, fronted by a skinny guy with glasses and enough hot fusion to unify pop, punk, poetry and blast the home of Newton and Malory into orbit. Three days later, according to the Gospel of You Tube, Elvis and the boys played the same song in Cologne.

"Heartbreak Hotel" by The Softboys

While at Cambridge, I busked for lunch money with a guitarist named Andy Metcalfe and a few of his mates who had a band called The Softboys. Fronted by Robyn Hitchcock who went on to create The Egyptians, the band played eclectic Syd Barrett-style tunes with titles like "Leppo and the Jooves" and "The Kingdome of Love". I sat in with them on electric violin at The Portland Arms and other pubs, on their surrealistic covers of "The Book of Love" and Elvis Presley's "Heartbreak Hotel," which featured the guitar of Kimberley Rew who went on to form Katrina and the Waves and make his fortune with a somewhat different song, "Walking on Sunshine."

"When I Paint My Masterpiece" by Bob Dylan

When Malory loses his grant and Louiza disappears, he runs off to Rome to pick up an inheritance. In a city reeling from the assassination of Aldo Moro, Malory finds that he has inherited the Kingdom of Septimania, given by Charlemagne in the 8th century to the Jews of southern France. Yet Malory's modern Septimania consists mostly of a villa hidden beneath the Aventine hill of Rome. Rome, where I've lived for the past ten years, is indeed a city of layers, of secrets buried by the fall and rise of many empires. Renaissance palaces stand on the shoulders of Roman temples. Michelangelo rubs shoulders with Julius Caesar. " As Bob Dylan wrote in "When I Paint My Masterpiece": there are "ancient footprints everywhere. It almost feels like you're seeing double, on a cold dark night on the Spanish Stairs."

"Jeremija" by Goran Bregovic

Although he is King of Septimania (and Holy Roman Emperor, King of the Jews, and possibly Caliph of All Islam) Malory is without Louiza and alone. He is taken in by another pair of exiles, Tibor and his wife Cristina. Every night, after their menial jobs are over, Tibor and Cristina gather The Bomb Squad and The Nurses, a loose group of fellow Rumanians, to drink and sing in a Mittel Europa cabaret of the kind perfectly captured in the films of Emir Kusturiça and his manic Sarajevan composer, Goran Bregovic.

"Cherry Bomb" by The Runaways

Meanwhile, Louiza has been spirited off to a house just north of New York City, where, in a vague fugue state, she solves complex mathematical problems involving imaginary numbers for a shadowy American intelligence organization. One days, she comes to and realizes that a number of unimaginable things have happened to her. At that moment, she begins to hear music and sees a kick-ass, all-girl band—The Unimaginables. When I imagined these wonder women in PVC and dirndls, I visualized The Runaways, the all-girl hard rock quintet featuring Joan Jett on guitar and Cherie Currie on lead vocals, whose anthem to the power of female sexuality, "Cherry Bomb" hit the charts in 1976.

"Ne neheldj" by Iva Bittova

In 2002, I flew to Prague and drove to the little town of Lelekovice in an attempt to persuade the Czech singer Iva Bittova to star in a chamber version of the opera Don Giovanni. Iva wasn't an opera singer. But I'd been smitten with Iva's music only the month before, a sentiment I shared with Vaclav Havel, the writer, president and all-round Czech hero, who was her Number One fan. Iva was a popular movie star in her early twenties, but is best known for singing Czech folk and gypsy songs while accompanying herself on the violin. "Ne neheldj" (No, no one look) was the song that set me in search of her, magicked by her incantatory fiddle and witchy voice.

"Unimaginable" by Jonathan Levi and Andy Metcalfe, featuring Iva Bittova

It has been thirty-eight years since I met Andy, fourteen since I met Iva, and twenty-four since I published my first novel A Guide for the Perplexed. And yet recording "Unimaginable" for the book trailer for Septimania, was the work of a single, unified moment. As Malory and Louiza discover, over the fifty-year search that is Septimania, time and love can be as strong and as flexible as gravity.


Jonathan Levi and Septimania links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
video trailer for the book

Kirkus review
LitReactor review
Publishers Weekly review
Wall Street Journal review

Chicago Review of Books interview with the author
Electric Literature interview with the author
The Leonard Lopate Show interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Curtis Smith "Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five: Bookmarked"

Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five: Bookmarked

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Curtis Smith's Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five: Bookmarked s the first book in Ig Publishing exciting new series where authors explain how a book influenced their writing.


In his own words, here is Curtis Smith 's Book Notes music playlist for his book Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five: Bookmarked:


Writing a book about a favorite book is kind of like a nerdy, dream-within-a-dream. When I was approached about the project, I immediately considered Slaughterhouse-Five. A favorite book from one of my favorite authors—and as such, there was a moment of trepidation at the project's start. Who was I to tackle this man's work? Then I started my initial note jotting, and by the time I'd finished a page, I found myself down the rabbit hole. Slaughterhouse's tone is light and comic, yet so much roils beneath. How can a book with so much death be so funny? It's a balancing act. A magician's trick. A walk through the clouds.

Page by page, I filled my notebook. I followed a myriad of threads—the history of PTSD, theories of time, the cataloguing of massacres, historical quotes, Vonnegut's writings and interviews, the quantum noodlings of alternate realities—and I attempted to take these strands and weave in bits of my own experiences. I did my best to remain true to both the book's form and tone.

I hope I did it justice. And I hope my music list does the same.

"Space Truckin'"—Deep Purple
Tralfamador is a long way off. Really long. Space Truckin is the only way to get there. Why, you ask, would life forms as advanced as the Tralfamadorians do all that Space Truckin to visit a planet whose inhabitants expend their greatest energies trying to kill their own kind, a planet whose most intelligent beings are caught up in endless cycles of repeating their most horrific mistakes? Here's what the Tralfamadorians would say: "Why is a very Earthling question to ask. Why you? Why us? Why anything?"

"God Makes No Mistakes"—Loretta Lynn
"Of course," say the Tralfamadorians, "although we don't believe in your God. But, yes, what is is what is, forever and ever. Amen. There are no mistakes because there is no free will. Why is this so difficult for Earthlings to comprehend?"

"Gimme Shelter"—The Rolling Stones
Poor Billy Pilgrim, lost behind enemy lines, hallucinating, his boots full of snow, a prisoner of the Reich. Poor people of Dresden, the Russians closing in, the planes overhead. Billy would meet them in the end, their shelter no match for the science of war. Billy the miner of corpses. The only difference between him and them the shelter of Slaughterhouse-Five.

"Days"—David Bowie
Bowie's gone, and with him, part of my youth. But he's not really gone, is he? In certain theories of time, he still exists, waiting to be reborn in a familiar chord, a triggered memory. Ziggy Stardust on the turntable, the mid-seventies, Vonnegut on my nightstand. That man-boy who is my seed and echo but also a stranger. The man-boy who exists, just as I do today. He waits for me in my dreams. He runs ahead of me, a pace I can no longer keep. Me and Billy Pilgrim, lost within the days of our lives. Sometimes happy. Sometimes not. Always grateful.

"War Pigs"—Black Sabbath
1969 and the dream was ending. The previous year's blood, single-shot assassinations, entire villages set aflame. The year's final months—Altamont and Manson. A man on the moon. 1970 or 71—my brother buys Sabbath's first album, and "War Pigs" brims with the mud of the trenches and the stink of death. The shells overhead, manmade thunder, a rain of steel. The hippies with their cries for peace. How self-important, how naïve—their schemes of levitating the Pentagon, of stopping the war. They might as well have tried to stop a glacier.

"Beautiful World"—Devo
The Tralfamadorians told Billy to only look at the pretty things. "Yes," they say, "it's a beautiful world." The rest of us are only too happy to wear their blinders, to see today's wars as a child might. A blip on the screen, a plume of smoke. The perspective of angels and pilots and orbiting satellites. The suffering below snuffed by our desire to only witness life's pretty things.

"Cortez the Killer"—Neil Young
The wheel turns. Soldiers die. Cities are conquered, the fate of civilians relegated to the collateral. The victors write history, their rapes and massacres hushed. Listen to Voltaire: "It is forbidden to kill. Therefore, all murders are punished, unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets."

"The Sounds of Science"—Beastie Boys
We are surrounded by ghosts—at least in the quantum world. The decisions made and unmade. The trains we miss. The paths unexplored. The hands we fail to reach out and hold. These moments and their domino-tumbling outcomes exist—right now, alongside us—a hundred million echoes, and who's to say the quantum scientists are wrong? Not me, I say. Not us, say my legion of ghost-brothers.

"Going Home"—Leonard Cohen
Billy Pilgrim first becomes unstuck in time behind German lines. He's a soldier without a gun, a child in a children's crusade, starving and cold. He travels back to the womb, warmth and red light. He wants to return home. He wants to be safe and protected and surrounded by those he loves. Later, after his wife's death and the distancing of his children, Billy finds himself home, crying behind his locked door as a cripple tries to sell him magazines. Home, he learns, especially for a man who's seen such terrible things, isn't always a matter of geography.

"Sleep Now in the Fire"—Rage Against the Machine
I don't want to look at pretty things all the time. Most of the time, yes, just not all the time. I need to see the stacks of bodies Billy piled—thirty, forty, fifty at a time. Grandparents, mothers, children. I need to see the torch upon the pyre, need to smell the burnt flesh, if only for a single, horrible second. I don't want to live with Billy's placid acceptance. I want to be angry at all we've failed to learn. I want to understand the fire, if such a thing is possible.

"Time After Time"—Cyndi Lauper
There is the A-theory of time. The B-theory. Einstein's theories, the warp found beyond the speed of light. Presentism and Eternalism. Nietzsche's eternal recurrence. Poor Billy, a delicate creature unstuck in time. Poor us, chained to our pinhole perspective as the hours and years fly past. Hello! Farewell! Hello! Farewell!

"Across the Universe"—The Beatles
Nothing's going to change Billy's world. "Of course," the Tralfamadorians say, "because nothing can change. Everything is. Everything was. Every always will be. Just ignore the horrible scenes and dead bodies. Just enjoy the pretty things." Jai Guru Deva. Om.

"Soldier's Things"—Tom Waits
Billy, like millions before him, survives the battlefield only to carry his scars through life. Wounds impossible to bandage or stitch. Wounds treated with silence and alcohol and self-imposed exile. Or, in Billy's case, time travel.

"Space Lord"—Monster Magnet
Billy and the lovely Montana Wildhack in their domed cage. A Tralfamadorian zoo. The nearest human thousands of light years away. Billy Pilgrim, modest and unthreatening on Earth, the prisoner of war forced to wear silver boots and a woman's frock, is now a lord of space. All hail Billy Pilgrim.


Curtis Smith and Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five: Bookmarked links:

Monkeybicycle essay by the author about the book


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (Viet Thanh Nguyen on Being Awarded the Pulitzer, James McBride on James Brown, and more)

Literary Hub interviewed Viet Thanh Nguyen, whose novel The Sympathizer was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction yesterday.


James McBride talked to Morning Edition about his new book Kill 'Em And Leave: Searching For James Brown And The American Soul.


Emily St. John Mandel reminisced about her book tour.


Rolling Stone examined the resurgence of music on cassettes.


The Seattle Review of Books profiled author Danielle Dutton.


Stream a new Beth Orton song.


The New York Times examined the influence of author Eileen Myles.


Stream a new Deerhoof song.


Literary Hub recommended poets you should be reading.


NYCTaper shared a recording of the Mountain Goats Saturday NYC show.


Divedapper interviewed poet Fanny Howe.


SPIN profiled the band Beach Slang.


Stream part one of Mitchell S. Jackson's documentary.


Bernie Sanders' secret campaign weapon: indie rockers.


Neal Bascomb discussed writing history at Literary Hub.


Salon interviewed Bob Boilen about his anthology Your Song Changed My Life.


The finalists for the 2016 Best Translated Book Awards have been announced.


Composer Henry Threadgill talked to A Blog Supreme about winning the Pulitzer Prize for music.


Philadelphia's chapbook vending machine.


The A.V. Club reconsidered Hum's 1995 album You’d Prefer An Astronaut.


The 2016 Pulitzer Prizes were announced yesterday.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Eight Hundred Grapes by Laura Dave
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell
J.D. Salinger: The Escape Artist by Thomas Beller
A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash
The Lost Tribe of Coney Island by Claire Prentiss
Shakespeare: The World as a Stage by Bill Bryson
South on Highland by Liana Maeby
The Time Is Noon by Pearl Buck



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

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April 18, 2016

Book Notes - Michelle de Kretser "Springtime"

Springtime

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Michelle de Kretser's novella Springtime is a poignant and eloquent ghost story.

The Independent wrote of the book:

"A dark gem of a book . . . .One reads Springtime not for its shock value--this tale is much more subtle than that--but for the way De Kretser explores the nature of ambiguity and for her deliciously unsettling descriptions."


In her own words, here is Michelle de Kretser's Book Notes music playlist for her novella Springtime:


1. I'm pretty sure that Frances, the main character in Springtime, listens to classical music while researching and writing. So my first choice is the first piece from Schumann's Scenes from Childhood. The piece is called 'Of Foreign Lands and Peoples' and Frances, who has moved to Sydney from Melbourne, sometimes feels herself to be living in a foreign land. Also, it's a haunting work, which suits a ghost story. Frances is rather child-like herself, and the book also features her partner's child, with whom Frances has a rather uneasy relationship, so that's another reason why I've chosen this music.

2. When Frances first meets Charlie, he is married to someone else. Throughout their relationship, Frances is haunted by Charlie's past. So the second track I've chosen is 'The Dark End Of The Street' by James Carr, a wonderfully melancholy song about illicit love.

3. Really, there was no choice involved when it came to the third track: it had to be 'Walking The Dog' by Rufus Thomas. Frances is walking her dog by the river when she catches sight of a mysterious woman whom she comes to think might be a ghost. I walk my dog by that same river every morning, and it was something I saw there that set me writing Springtime.

4. Springtime is set in Sydney, and its streetscapes and lush climate are very much part of the book. So I wanted to include a track about Sydney, and I was surprised to that there aren't many – Melbourne seems to have inspired far more songs. Still, I did manage to find one, by Paul Kelly, who is probably Australia's best known singer-songwriter (although his songs about Melbourne and Adelaide are far more popular!). So my last track is his 'Sydney From A 747' – which is fitting, as Springtime ends with Frances waiting to catch a flight out of Sydney.


Michelle de Kretser and Springtime links:

the author's Wikipedia entry

The Australian review
Independent review
Kirkus review
LitReactor review
Publishers Weekly review
Sydney Morning Herald review

Vol. 1 Brooklyn review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Book Notes - John Smelcer "Savage Mountain" and "Stealing Indians"

Savage Mountain Stealing Indians


In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Acclaimed poet John Smelcer is also an impressive writer of young adult novels, including Savage Mountain and Stealing Indians.


In his own words, here is John Smelcer's Book Notes music playlist for his novels Savage Mountain and Stealing Indians:


My 2015 adventure novel Savage Mountain is the incredible story of two teenage brothers, Sebastian and James Savage, who set off on a journey to climb one of Alaska tallest mountains to prove to their demeaning father that they are strong and courageous young men, worthy of his love and respect. It's a story that should resonate with most sons, and I dare say with many daughters as well. So many young people feel like they don't measure up to their parent's ideals. The novel is based on true events. Although I set the story in the early 1980s, when my brother and I were still in high school in Fairbanks, the actual event occurred a few years later. My brother committed suicide in April of 1988, only a year or so after our summit. Years later, I returned to the mountain alone to throw some of his ashes into the wind. He's part of the mountain now. A soundtrack to Savage Mountain would include songs that inspire listeners to rise to challenges and to believe in ourselves, but it would also have to include songs about loss and grief.

No sports/adventure story about pushing oneself to the physical limits would be complete without Survivor's ubiquitous 'Eye of the Tiger' made famous by one of the Rocky movies. I can just see a scene from the book as a motion picture: the climber reaches for an impossible handhold, grabs hold with his fingertips, pulls himself up the cliff face by sheer muscle, his toes searching for a toehold, kicking loose rocks, which plummet hundreds of feet to the valley below.

Jim Croce's 'I Got a Name' would definitely be included in the soundtrack; maybe as background music on the radio when the two brothers are driving to the place where they begin their ascent of the mountain. With lyrics such as “They can change their minds but they can't change me, I've got a dream, I've got a dream,' I always felt the song was about me…for me. It's been my mantra, an old friend that reminds me it's okay to be me.

One of the top hits of the summer my brother died was Cheap Trick's haunting love song 'The Flame.' With lyrics like, 'I can't believe you're gone' and 'Wherever you go, I'll be with you,' the song quickly became my brother's mourning song. It was even on the radio during his wake. It still affects me deeply every time I hear it. The song reached the top of the charts that year. Oddly enough, the band didn't like the song at first and didn't want to include it on their album Lap of Luxury.

But no soundtrack to my brother's life would be complete without at least one song from his favorite band, AC/DC. I choose two from around the time we climbed the mountain, saving each other's life time and time again: “Highway to Hell' from Highway to Hell (1979) and 'You Shook Me All Night Long' from Back in Black (1980). Even now when I hear them I sing along loudly for my brother's sake (I didn't like AC/DC back then; my musical tastes were more subdued. Barry Manilow was more my speed).

My forthcoming novel Stealing Indians (August 2016) is also based on true events. From the late 1800s up until the late 1950s, the U. S. government removed Native American children from their families and communities and sent them off to Indian boarding schools, sometimes more than a thousand miles away from home. The policy was to deny the children their Indian identity and replace it with White values. Children were expressly forbidden from speaking their own indigenous languages. They were physically punished if caught doing so. The novel follows four teenage children, each from a different region of America, and how their unlikely friendship helps them to endure their first year at the fictitious and ironically named Wellington. A sound-track to this novel would include songs about injustice, but also about the bonds of friendship and love.

'Indian Reservation' by Paul Revere and the Raiders, often mistakenly called “Cherokee Nation.' With its deliberate double-time drumbeat and accusatory lines like, “Took away our native tongue/and taught their English to our young,' Although the British Invasion band culturally appropriates the persona of American Indians, this song could be the title track.

Andrew Gold's 'Thank You for Being a Friend' could easily be included in the soundtrack. It even fits. The events of the novel occurred in the 1980s around the same time the song was used as the theme to the hit television series, The Golden Girls.

'Stand By Me' by Ben E. King. More than one critic has written that Stealing Indians is a kind of Indian version of Stephen King's coming-of-age classic, Stand By Me.


John Smelcer and Savage Mountain and Stealing Indians links:

the author's website


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (Authors on Jane Eyre, An Interview with Andrew Bird, and more)

Authors (including Sarah Waters, Margaret Drabble, and Jeanette Winterson) discussed the influence of Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre at the Guardian.


All Things Considered interviewed Andrew Bird about his new album Are You Serious.


Book Riot previewed small press books to read in April.


Willie Nelson remembered Merle Haggard at Rolling Stone.


The evolution of the library card.


Stream a live version of Pylon's "Gravity."


Hilary Mantel shared her writing routine at the Guardian.


Pitchfork profiled singer-songwriter Anohni.


SF Signal interviewed author Victor LaValle.


Stream two new Hope Sandoval songs.


Author Michael Chabon shared a tribute to Pittsburgh bookseller Jay Dantry.


PopMatters profiled the band Haelos.


The Independent listed the best books about Shakespeare.


The A.V. Club shared an Elliott Smith playlist.


Curtis Sittenfeld talked about her novel Eligible with Weekend Edition and the Guardian.


The Record profiled singer-songwriter Cate Le Bon.


Author Eileen Myles discussed her favorite books at the New York Times.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Eight Hundred Grapes by Laura Dave
Expo 58 by Jonathan Coe
How to Live: Or A Life of Montaigne in One Question and Twenty Attempts at an Answer by Sarah Bakewell
J.D. Salinger: The Escape Artist by Thomas Beller
A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash
The Lost Tribe of Coney Island by Claire Prentiss
Shakespeare: The World as a Stage by Bill Bryson
South on Highland by Liana Maeby
The Time Is Noon by Pearl Buck



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 17, 2016

Largehearted Boy Weekly Wrap-Up - April 17, 2016

A list of the past week's Largehearted Boy features:


Book Notes: (authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates to their book)

Amelia Martens for her poetry collection The Spoons in the Grass Are There to Dig a Moat
Augusten Burroughs for his memoir Lust & Wonder
Greg Vandy for his book 26 Songs in 30 Days: Woody Guthrie's Columbia River Songs and the Planned Promised Land in the Pacific Northwest
Joni Murphy for her novel Double Teenage
Leah Umansky for her poetry chapbook Straight Away the Emptied World
Melissa Ginsburg for her novel Sunset City
Virginia Reeves for her novel Work Like Any Other


Weekly New Book Recommendations:

Atomic Books Comics Preview (recommended new comics and graphic novels)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


New Music Recommendations:

The Week's Interesting Music Releases


And of course, the daily literature and music news ans link posts:

Shorties (news & links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Antiheroines
Atomic Books Comics Preview
Book Notes
Cover Song Collections
Lists
weekly music release lists
musician/author Interviews
Note Books
Soundtracked
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week

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April 15, 2016

Book Notes - Melissa Ginsburg "Sunset City"

Sunset City

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Melissa Ginsburg's debut novel Sunset City is an impressive work of literary noir.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Ginsburg, a poet, crafts pitch-perfect dialogue and develops Charlotte and Houston with a disarming mix of nostalgic sadness and brutal honesty. A great recommendation for readers who enjoyed Gillian Flynn’s Sharp Objects."


In her own words, here is Melissa Ginsburg 's Book Notes music playlist for her debut novel Sunset City:


Sunset City is a literary noir set in the drug-fueled sex industry of Houston, Texas. A mystery novel that is also a meditation on friendship and loss. Danielle Reeves is charismatic, beautiful, and difficult. Her murder devastates everyone who knew her.

"I Think We're Alone Now," Tiffany
This song, unnamed in the novel, comes on the car radio the night Charlotte and Audrey become friends. They drive around high on coke after Danielle's funeral. The song was recorded in 1987, before Audrey or Charlotte were born, so it has always existed in their lives. They don't know or care who Tiffany is, but they know all the words and can sing along.

"Lua," Bright Eyes
A quiet, plaintive song about loneliness, cocaine, and one-night stands. This song acknowledges the folly of this lifestyle while evoking its compelling beauty. Drugs and sex are a perfect antidote to grief, for as long as they last, because they provide escape and connection simultaneously. This song pairs well with Chapter 9, in which Charlotte and Brandon, Danielle's grieving boyfriend, find one another.

"Sunset City," Magnetic Fields
This song was stuck in my head throughout the writing of Sunset City. Houston has beautiful, amazing sunsets, because of the high humidity and bad air pollution. You can see so much sky there, especially from the top of a freeway overpass. Stephin Merritt sings, "I stay so long in a place/And then move on to the next town." This one's for Audrey, who leaves home at 16 and never stops moving.

"Racing Like a Pro," The National
Sally Reeves, Danielle's mother, is a successful real estate developer—wealthy, powerful, and perhaps the loneliest person in the novel. If anybody ever wrote a love song for Sally, it would be this one. But no one ever did.

"Haunted," The Pogues with Sinead O'Connor
A growling, ethereal, nostalgic love song full of odd contrasts. Shane MacGowan slurs the amazing lines, "You were so cool/ you could've put out Vietnam." Everybody who ever knew Danielle Reeves feels this way about her. I can imagine the whole city singing to Danielle, "I want to be haunted by the ghost/of your precious love."

"This Is What Makes Us Girls," Lana del Rey
An anthem for Charlotte and Danielle, in the old days, a song about teen friendship, sunshine, and mutual destruction. It evokes the particular heartbreak of reckless, beautiful girls—awe at the power of their own desirability, knowing/not knowing that it's temporary, that it's not really power at all. They would die for each other's love, until it gets diluted and corrupted by drugs, boys, and adulthood.

"Survivor," Destiny's Child
Houston's hometown heroes. Charlotte listens to this song over and over when she runs in the Houston heat. But there's always a disconnect here. These ladies are so slick, so polished, they slid right out of town; Houston is not really a place that can contain superstars. Charlotte runs faster but feels more alone.

"Chord Organ Blues," Daniel Johnston
This one's for Houston. A Texas song that stays in Texas, running in circles, running itself raw. Still, it sounds like a celebration: "Everything's big in Texas, you know it is/I think I might've made a big mistake."


Melissa Ginsburg and Sunset City links:

the author's website

Austin Chronicle review
Booklist review
Guardian review

The DM Online profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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