November 2, 2018

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - November 2, 2018

Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan's More Blood, More Tracks: The Bootleg Series Vol. 14 is a 6-CD box set that captures his 1974 Blood on the Tracks sessions.

Hiss Golden Messenger's Devotion: Songs About Rivers and Spirits and Children 4-CD collection of albums and rarities is another box set I can recommend.

The lone new album I can recommend is Sun Kil Moon's This Is My Dinner.


This week's interesting music releases:

Arcade Fire: Arcade Fire EP [vinyl]
Ariana Grande: Sweetener [vinyl]
Barbra Streisand: Walls
Bill Ryder-Jones: Yawn
Bob Dylan: More Blood, More Tracks: The Bootleg Series Vol. 14
Bob Dylan: More Blood, More Tracks: The Bootleg Series Vol. 14 (6-CD box set)
Bronski Beat: Age of Consent (reissue) [vinyl]
Charles Mingus: Jazz In Detroit / Strat Concert Gallery / 46 Selden (3-disc box set)
Dan Mangan: More Or Less
David Bowie: The Lost Sessions
Dead Can Dance: Dionysus
Eagles: Legacy (14-disc box set)
Grinderman: Grinderman (reissue) [vinyl]
Hiss Golden Messenger: Bad Debt
Hiss Golden Messenger: Devotion: Songs About Rivers and Spirits and Children (4-CD box set)
Hiss Golden Messenger: Haw (reissue) [vinyl]
Hiss Golden Messenger: Poor Moon
Imogen Heap: The Music of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child
James Taylor: Hourglass [vinyl]
JD McPherson: Socks
Joni MItchell: Love Has Many Faces: A Quartet A Ballet Waiting To Be Danced (12-LP box set) [vinyl]
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard: 12 Bar Bruise Green (reissue) [vinyl]
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard: Eyes Like the Sky Orange (reissue) [vinyl]
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard: Float Along - Fill Your Lungs Yellow (reissue) [vinyl]
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard: Oddments Purple (reissue) [vinyl]
Los Campesinos!: No Blues (reissue) [vinyl]
Mariah Carey: Merry Christmas (reissue) [vinyl]
Marianne Faithfull: Negative Capability
The Mavericks: Hey! Merry Christmas!
Metallica: ...And Justice For All (remastered) [vinyl]
Metallica: ...And Justice For All (3-CD box set) (remastered and expanded)
Metallica: ...And Justice For All (6-LP/11-CD/4-DVD box set) (remastered and expanded)
Moody Blues: In Search Of The Lost Chord: 50th Anniversary Edition (5-disc box set) (remastered and expanded)
Nick Cave and Warren Ellis: The Proposition (soundtrack) (remastered) [vinyl]
Paul Williams: Jim Henson's Emmet Otter's Jug-Band Christmas
Pistol Annies: Interstate Gospel
The Prodigy: No Tourists
Richard Lloyd: Countdown
Rod McKuen: New Carols for Christmas - The Rod McKuen Christmas Album (reissue)
Rodney Crowell: Christmas Everywhere
Roseanne Cash: She Remembers Everything
Sun Kil Moon: This Is My Dinner
Tenacious D: Post-Apocalypto
Touche Amore: 10 Years/1000 Shows: Live at the Regent Theater
Various Artists: Harmony In My Head: UK Power Pop & New Wave 1977-1981 (3-CD box set)
Traveling Wilburys: The Traveling Wilburys, Vol. 1 (reissue) [vinyl]
Various Artists: Curiosity Shop Volume Seven
Various Artists: Hillbillies In Hell - Country Music's Tormented Testament 1952-1974 The Rapture
Will Oldham: Songs of Love and Horror


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily book and music news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

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November 2, 2018

Shorties (A Reader's Guide to Haruki Murakami, LCD Soundsystem Covered Heaven 17, and more)

Haruki Murakami

Signature shared a reader's guide to the works of Haruki Murakami.


LCD Soundsystem covered Heaven 17's (We Don't Need This) Groove Thang."


27 "best books of 2018" lists were added to Largehearted Boy's master aggregation yesterday (bringing the total to 87), including Goodreads' books of the year lists, Reader's Digest's best audiobooks, and The Week UK's best cookbooks.


Noisey shared a guide to getting into the music of Brian Eno.


November's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

The Secret Piano by Zhu Xiao-Mei

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman
How To Cook Everything: The Basics by Mark Bittman
How To Cook Everything: Simple Recipes for the Best Baking by Mark Bittman
How To Cook Everything Fast by Mark Bittman
How To Cook Everything: Vegetarian by Mark Bittman
How To Grill Everything by Mark Bittman


The Los Angeles Times interviewed composer Steve Reich.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn, NYLON, and TIME previewed November's best books.


Mountain Man visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance,


Shelley Jackson talked to Shondaland about her new novel, Riddance.


Paste recapped October's best songs.


Granta interviewed author Akwaeke Emezi.


Stream a new Sneaks song.


Jonathan Lethem shared the literary inspirations behind his new novel, The Feral Detective, at Vulture.


Stream a new song by Meg Baird and Mary Lattimore.


Michael Caine discussed his memoir, Blowing the Bloody Doors Off, with All Things Considered.


Stream a new Dehd song.


Bookworm interviewed author Ben Fountain.


Stream a new Guided By Voices song.


Eve L. Ewing recommended essential Chicago books at Publishers Weekly.


Stream a new song by Stars.


Anita Felicelli talked to The Rumpus about her short story collection, Love Songs for a Lost Continent.


BrooklynVegan shared a playlist of October's best song.


Kathryn Harrison talked writing with Signature.


The Quietus recapped October's best new music.


Vanity Fair recommended the best new art books.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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November 1, 2018

"Best Books of 2018" Lists Update - November 1st

For the eleventh straight year, I am aggregating every online year-end book list I find in this post. As the lists appear online, I will add them to this master list, updating daily.

Please feel free to e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online list I have missed.

Daily updates to the master list of online "best books of 2018" lists.

Please consider making a donation or leaving a tip to Largehearted Boy to support posts like these.


Today's Updates to the Online "Best of 2018" Book Lists:


Carnegie Library (best books for babies)
Chicago Review of Books (best horror nonfiction books)
Goodreads (best debut authors)
Goodreads (best fantasy)
Goodreads (best fiction)
Goodreads (best food and cookbooks)
Goodreads (best graphic novels and comics)
Goodreads (best historical fiction)
Goodreads (best history and biography)
Goodreads (best horror)
Goodreads (best humor)
Goodreads (best memoir and autobiography)
Goodreads (best middle grade and children's)
Goodreads (best mystery and thriller)
Goodreads (best nonfiction)
Goodreads (best picture books)
Goodreads (best poetry)
Goodreads (best romance)
Goodreads (best science and technology)
Goodreads (best science fiction)
Goodreads (best young adult and science fiction)
Goodreads (best young adult fiction)
Governor General's Literary Awards (Canadian books)
Reader's Digest (best audiobooks)
The Week UK (best cookbooks)
What She Reads (best holiday books)
YALSA (top teen books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Online "Best Books of 2018" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2017" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2015" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists

2017 Year-End Online Music Lists
2016 Year-End Online Music Lists
2015 Year-End Online Music Lists
2014 Year-End Online Music Lists
2013 Year-End Online Music Lists
2012 Year-End Online Music Lists
2011 Year-End Online Music Lists
2010 Year-End Online Music Lists
2009 Year-End Online Music Lists
2008 Year-End Online Music Lists
2007 Year-End Online Music Lists
2006 Year-End Online Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Music Lists

other lists at Largehearted Boy
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
musician/author interviews

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November's Best eBook Deals

Free eBooks this month:


What's Eating Gilbert Grape


What's Eating Gilbert Grape by Peter Hedges


eBooks on sale for $1.99 this month:


Eleanor Henderson Rabih Alemeddine


Above the Waterfall by Ron Rash
Amy, My Daughter by Mitch Winehouse
Anne Frank by Francine Prose
The Art of Crash Landing by Melissa DeCarlo
The Art of Loading Brush by Wendell Berry
Black Water Rising by Attica Locke
Brief Candle in the Dark by Richard Dawkins
Diane von Furstenberg: A Life Unwrapped by Gioia Diliberto
Feminist Fairy Tales by Barbara G. Walker
The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things by JT Leroy
Illumination Night by Alice Hoffman
The Indifferent Stars Above: The Harrowing Saga of the Donner Party by Daniel James Brown
James Beard's Theory and Practice of Good Cooking by James Beard
L.A. Son by Roy Choi
Let Me Be Frank with You by Richard Ford
The Library by Stuart Kells
Obama: An Oral History by Brian Abrams
A Replacement Life by Boris Fishman
Ripper by Patricia Cornwell
The Search for God and Guinness by John Mansfield
Shock and Awe: Glam Rock and Its Legacy, from the Seventies to the Twenty-first Century by Simon Reynolds
The Space Trilogy by C. S. Lewis
Stick a Fork in Me by Dan Jenkins
The Twelve-Mile Straight by Eleanor Henderson
An Unnecessary Woman by Rabih Alemeddine
Whatever Happened to Interracial Love? by Kathleen Collins
When We Danced on Water by Evan Fallenberg


eBooks on sale for $2.99 this month:


Clarice Lispector W.G. Sebald


Around My French Table by Dorie Greenspan
The Book of Salt by Monique Truong
Complete Stories by Clarice Lispector
The Day of the Locust by Nathanael West
Edgar and Lucy by Victor Lodato
The Encyclopedia of Spices and Herbs by Padma Lakshmi
The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins
The Last Cowboys of San Geronimo by Ian Stansel
A Line Made by Walking by Sara Baume
Mercury: An Intimate Biography of Freddie Mercury by Lesley-Ann Jones
The Miracle of Mindfulness by Thich Nhat Hanh
The Rings of Saturn by W.G. Sebald
Salt Houses by Hala Alyan
Satantango by László Krasznahorkai
Since We Fell by Dennis Lehane
Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa


eBooks on sale for $3.99 this month:


Hermione Hoby Michelle de Kretser


Cooking with Love by Carla Hall
The Life to Come by Michelle de Kretser
Neon in Daylight by Hermione Hoby


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)

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Shorties (November's Best Books, Cat Power's Chan Marshall on Her Favorite Albums, and more)

Idra Novey

Literary Hub and the London Evening Standard recommended November's best books.


Cat Power's Chan Marshall discussed her favorite albums at The Quietus.


November's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $3.99 today:

The Martian by Andy Weir
Twelve Patients by Eric Manheimer


Madeline Kenny covered Sharon Van Etten's "Our Love."


Paste recapped October's best books.


The Pains of Being Pure at Heart covered Tom Petty's "Free Fallin'."


BuzzFeed recommended books that challenged our political landscape by inventing new ones.


Stream a new Conor Oberst song (that features Phoebe Bridgers).


Comic Book Resources wrapped up its list of the top 50 graphic novels.


Paste recommended essential slow-burn albums.


Chris Gethard talked about his new memoir, Get Well, with Rolling Stone.


Rolling Stone interviewed former Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr.


Anne Lamott discussed her new book, Almost Everything, with Salon.


NPR Music is streaming the Glands' first album in 18 years, Double Coda.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author Andre Dubus III.


Pitchfork shared the history of outlaw country in 33 songs.


The Guardian listed the top deaths in fiction.


NPR Music is streaming Charles Bradley's posthumous album, Black Velvet.


VICE profiled cartoonist Tillie Walden.

Tillie Walden is sick of fantasies dreamed up by men. “It feels like any subject matter outside of the real world, whenever we’re talking about our fantasies,” says the 22-year-old comic illustrator, “they’re always designed by men.” In On a Sunbeam, her fifth graphic novel, she attempts to mend this imbalance. “I wanted to create a fantastic world, an entire vision based around who I am, what it means to be a woman, what it means to be gay.”


Book Riot recapped October's best comics.


NPR Music is streaming Laura Jane Grace and the Devouring Mothers new album Bought to Rot.


Sixth Tone explored the literary legacy of Chinese author Louis Cha.


Book Riot recapped October's best books.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

October 31, 2018

Alicia Jo Rabins' Playlist for Her Poetry Collection "Fruit Geode"

Fruit Geode

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Alicia Jo Rabins' Fruit Geode is a fierce and intimate poetry collection.


In her own words, here is Alicia Jo Rabins' Book Notes music playlist for her poetry collection Fruit Geode:



Fruit Geode is a book of poems about the psychedelic, underwater experience of pregnancy, birth and early motherhood. On a larger level, it’s about what it means to live in a body, especially a female body - how weird and surprising and silly and tragic and beautiful the whole experience is. Woven through are some of my other obsessions: herbal medicine, Jewish mysticism, ancient Sumerian goddesses, sea life, space travel.

I wrote this book after moving from New York City to Oregon, and it definitely has a trippy, witchy, West Coast vibe. I felt like everything I knew had been changed, and I was hungry for beauty, and there was often a sleeping baby or a screaming toddler I was trying to calm. So I listened to a lot of quiet, ambient, beautiful music. I’m also a musician, so all this ambient music ended up inspiring a live soundtrack I’m improvising (on violin with electronic pedals) along with the poems on my book tour!

Buckle in, it’s gonna be…..chill.


A Winged Victory for the Sullen: Steep Hills of Vicodin Tears

In writing about pregnancy, birth and early parenthood, I kept feeling that on one hand, I was more anchored in my specific body than ever – but on the other, I had this odd feeling that I could transcend your own personality, the limits of my own life, and imagine myself into some ancient world, or some future world. That’s probably why I’ve found myself listening to a ton of ambient music over the past few years. It matches the weird, dreamy vibe of the poems I’ve been writing, and when I get cabin fever or things get too hectic with little kids, it chills us all out. This is one of my favorite tracks.

Garth Stevenson: The Southern Sea

In addition to being a writer, I’m a musician, and about halfway through writing this book, I decided I wanted to compose a live soundtrack on violin and electronic pedals, an abstract, ambient environment to perform along with the poems from Fruit Geode. (Video excerpt here!) This track has been a talisman for me in the process of writing the live soundtrack - I love the way Garth Stevenson combines processed electronic sounds with the unmistakable sound of a stringed instrument, and I listened to it a lot while editing the book, too.

Brian Eno: An Ending (Ascent)

This is another ambient, vibey track which sort of changes the air around me, makes it feel charged and holy, stretches time out, and matches the feeling of Fruit Geode. (I also listened to it a lot while writing and revising). I’m obsessed with plants as well as astrophysics right now – the earthiest, and the farthest from earth – so the book is full of medicinal herbs, and visits to other planets. I feel like this track is halfway between the secret music of plants talking to each other, and the music of the sphere.

Laura Gibson: Wintering

I love all of Laura Gibson’s albums, but somehow I got super obsessed with this very early one (If You Come To Greet Me) and played it nonstop over the two years I was writing Fruit Geode. This is one of my favorite songs off the album. I love how slow it is, and how sparse and simple. It’s cozy but also melancholy, perfect for making cookies with a two-year-old on a snow day.

Brian Eno: Music for Airports 1/1

Am I allowed to include Eno twice? This is a classic I listened to over and over and over while writing, editing, and just basically living the years this book is about. Another track that matches the weird, isolated, cozy, agonizing months with a baby – and, equally well, the weird, isolated, cozy, agonizing practice of writing. Fruit Geode contains a lot of poems about outer space, underwater life, inner universes and faraway planets, and this album is basically the perfect soundtrack.

Nick Drake – Which Will

I listened to the album this is from, Pink Moon, a lot during the years I was writing this book. As an artist I admire this album so much - the mix of technique and effortlessness, intimacy but also hiddenness, simplicity and complexity. And the album name is so beautiful - it’s a poem in itself!

Marine Layer: Evergreen

After the kids’ bedtime, while I worked on these poems upstairs, my husband (Aaron Hartman) was often downstairs recording this album all by himself, track by track, instrument by instrument, for his solo project Marine Layer. I think this is his version of finding some quiet among the chaos. I could often hear these beautiful songs seeping up as I sat at the kitchen table, editing, so they are definitely embedded in the DNA of Fruit Geode. It’s so beautiful, like Mazzy Star on cough syrup.

Leonard Cohen – Going Home

One of the themes of this book is leaving my youth behind at last, truly becoming a for real, one hundred percent adult, and the unexpected sadness involved with that. It felt like a kind of death. This song is from the last years of Leonard Cohen’s life; he’s singing about saying goodbye to life itself, and I love it so much, it was such good company during this transition. The line “A manual for living with defeat” is one of my favorites; I tried and failed to work that into a poem about a hundred times. We played this song as we drove across the Verrazano Bridge, moving out of New York, leaving this city I loved, setting off for the west coast with our baby in the backseat. So very bittersweet, so very real.


Alicia Jo Rabins and Fruit Geode links:

the author's website


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - October 31st, 2018

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Beautiful Darkness

Beautiful Darkness by Fabien Vehlmann and Kerascoët

Newly released in paperback form, Vehlmann and Kerascoët’s frightening fairytale makes a triumphant return with the addition of new material, unpublished art, and preparatory sketches. The tale of newly homeless fairies who must learn to survive in the woods is as surreal and unsettling as ever, and guaranteed to enchant a whole new wave of devotees.


Well-Read Black Girl

Well-Read Black Girl by Glory Edim

In this beautiful, necessary anthology, Glory Edim (founder of the Well-Read Black Girl Book Club) has brought together essays by luminaries such as Jesmyn Ward, Jacqueline Woodson, Gabourey Sidibe, and Rebecca Walker, all in an effort to discuss the importance of literary representation. After all, everyone deserves to see themselves within the pages of a good book.


Useful Phrases for Immigrants

Useful Phrases for Immigrants by May-Lee Chai

Deemed a “writer to remember” by Kirkus Review, Chai is an author for a globalized world. Exploring China, the Chinese diaspora, and beyond, her characters are uniquely relatable as they navigate the solace of old lovers, the shock of family secrets, grudges, traditions, forgiveness, and long-buried skeletons.


On Haiku

On Haiku by Hiroaki Sato

Fresh from New Directions, fifty years of Sato’s thought, translations, and poetry are collected in On Haiku. A seminal text that explores the many facets of the form, whether classical, contemporary, or international, it is essential reading in poetry.


Paperback Crush

Paperback Crush by Gabrielle Moss

From babysitters to horseback riders, gymnasts to Sweet Valley twins, the totally radical history of '80s and '90s teen fiction is given its due in Moss’s shockingly comprehensive—and fun—exploration.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (An Interview with Jamel Brinkley, Daryl Sanders on His New Bob Dylan Book, and more)

That Thin Wild Mercury Sound

Tin House interviewed author Jamel Brinkley.


Daryl Sanders discussed his book, That Thin Wild Mercury Sound: Dylan, Nashville and the Making of Blonde on Blonde, with the Rolling Stone podcast.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Chaya Bhuvaneswar.


Stream a new Deerhunter song.


October's best eBook deals.


Stream two new Fashion Brigade songs.


PEN America shared a "visual disobedience" list of graphic novels.


Stream a new Sharon Van Etten song.


Electric Literature recommended books to help combat impostor syndrome.


Stream a new Pedro the Lion song.


John Scalzi listed his favorite science fiction books at The Week.


Paste recapped the best albums of October.


Unbound Worlds recommended horror classics.


PopMatters interviewed singer-songwriter Julia Holter.


Guernica interviewed author Lacy M. Johnson.


Stream a new song by Washer.


Craig Morgan Teicher recommended books about starting out as a poet at BookMarks.


Stereogum recommended essential horror soundtrack songs.


Stereogum interviewed Art Brut's Eddie Argos.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

October 30, 2018

David Grann's Playlist for His Book "The White Darkness"

The White Darkness

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

David Grann's new book The White Darkness is the thrilling story of Antarctic adventurer Henry Worsley.

The Minneapolis Star Tribune wrote of the book:

"The suspense of a thriller…so compelling…Grann is expert at making readers feel as if they are on the journey."


In his own words, here is David Grann's Book Notes music playlist for his book The White Darkness:


While researching my new book, The White Darkness, about the remarkable polar explorer Henry Worsley, I was curious about the music that he and his companions listened to while enduring a brutal and uninhabitable environment. What songs inspired and nourished them during those endless hours?

Worsley was a polymath and a revered British Army officer. Ever since he was young, he’d been obsessed with the polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. During the early twentieth century, Shackleton had failed in repeated attempts to reach the South Pole and a later effort to trek across Antarctica, but he had rescued his men from certain death and proven himself to be a masterful leader. Worsley felt a special connection to the great explorer: one of Worsley’s ancestors had been a member of a Shackleton-led expedition. Worsley became a leading authority on Shackleton, and even modeled his military command on the explorer’s methods of leadership.

In 2008, one hundred years after Shackleton tried to reach the South Pole, Worsley set out to reenact the doomed journey, which was known as the Nimrod expedition. It was Worsley’s first polar experience. He was forty-eight, and he teamed up with two descendants from the original party: a thirty-seven-year-old banker named Will Gow, who was Shackleton’s great-nephew, and Henry Adams, a thirty-four-year-old shipping lawyer and the great-grandson of Jameson Boyd Adams—the second-in-command on the Nimrod expedition.

Worsley and his two companions planned to try to reach Shackleton’s farthest point and then press on to the South Pole, completing, in Gow’s words, “unfinished family business.” It was a journey of more than nine hundred miles, across a region where icy winds frequently blow at gale force and temperatures can sink to minus one hundred degrees Fahrenheit. Each man had to haul all his supplies on a sled, which weighed, at the outset, more than three hundred pounds. Worsley estimated that the expedition would take nine weeks. Because of the howling winds, it was hard to converse as they trekked—sometimes as long as fourteen hours a day. To break the awesome silence, each of them carried an iPod with playlists.

“Eyes on the Prize,” by Bruce Springsteen and The Seeger Sessions Band

Worsley’s taste was eclectic, but the songs he often returned to on his playlist were by Springsteen and The Seeger Sessions Band. “Eyes on the Prize” had obvious resonance. As Worsley hauled his sled, with his back bent and every muscle aching, he took encouragement from “I got my hand on the gospel plow / Won’t take nothing for / my journey now.”

“Ramblin’ Man,” by Lemon Jelly

During the morning hours, Gow preferred to march without music; if he played songs early in the day, he became consumed with calculating how many minutes and seconds each song lasted and with worrying about how far he still had to go. In the afternoons, though, he liked to slide his skis to Lemon Jelly’s electronic pulsating rhythms.

Rachmaninoff Vespers

The winds whipped up ice particles into blinding whiteouts, making it impossible to see which way was up or down. Adams, who once became so disoriented and nauseous in a whiteout that he threw up, found solace in Rachmaninoff’s choral sounds.

“Space Oddity,” by David Bowie

Gow also used music to maintain his sanity during whiteouts, though a Bowie song he listened to had an ominous message:

Ground Control to Major Tom
Your circuit’s dead,
there’s something wrong

“Bird Gerhl” and “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door,” by Antony and the Johnsons

Worsley and his companions occasionally shared their music with each other. Adams had Worsley listen to Rachmanoff’s Vespers, and Worsley introduced both Gow and Adams to Antony and the Johnsons.

“Mothership,” by Led Zeppelin

Gow’s favorite music is the blues, but his most vivid memories on the journey are of marching through the fog of ice particles to this compilation of greatest hits by Led Zeppelin, which includes “Ramble On,” “Achilles Last Stand,” and “Stairway to Heaven.” Gow recalled, “It was hard-hitting stuff that gave you a jolt and kept you alert.”

“We Shall Overcome,” by Bruce Springsteen and The Seeger Sessions Band

As the party neared the South Pole, Worsley was depleted. “Energy just poured from my body, to be snatched away and dissipated by the wind,” he later wrote. “My legs would not work any faster. Each stride of the ski seemed locked at a precise distance.” He was spurred on by the lines “We are not afraid, / We are not afraid.”

On January 18, 2009, at 4:32 P.M., after sixty-six days, Worsley and his companions—emaciated, with icicles dripping from their beards—reached the South Pole. Worsley never thought that he’d return to Antarctica again, but inevitably he was drawn back. In 2015, at age fifty-five, he bade farewell to his family and embarked on his most perilous quest: to walk across Antarctica alone.

This time, his playlist included even more songs than before. Early during the journey, he noted, “Music certainly helped today,” adding, “Lots of Bowie, Johnny Cash, and Meat Loaf.” But as he pressed on the earbuds to his iPod broke, and he found himself alone in utter silence.


David Grann and The White Darkness links:

the author's website

Minneapolis Star Tribune review
Wall Street Journal review

CBS Sunday Morning profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Michael Chabon on Star Trek, Stereogum's Best New Bands of 2018, An Interview with Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, and more)

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah

Michael Chabon talked Star Trek with the Jewish News of Northern California.


Stereogum listed the best new bands of 2018.


Electric Literature interviewed author Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah.


Mitski visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


October's best eBook deals.

eBook on sale for $1.99 today:

The White Album by Joan Didion

eBook on sale for $3.99 today:

Lilith's Brood: The Complete Xenogenesis Trilogy by Octavia E. Butler


The Lemonheads covered Yo La Tengo's "Can't Forget."


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Jan Elizabeth Watson.


Stereogum reconsidered R.E.M.'s Up album 20 years after its release.


Slate shared Jami Attenberg's introduction to the new Julie Doucet collection, Dirty Plotte.


Natalie Prass covered Dionne Warwick's "Deja Vu.


John Jay Osborn discussed his new novel, Listen to the Marriage, with All Things Considered.


Stream a new song by Stove.


Coming Soon listed the best uses of books in film.


Book Riot recommended must-read books by Slavic authors.


The Paris Review interviewed author Susan Orlean.


Literary Hub shared a conversation between authors Meg Wolitzer and Andre Dubus III.


BookMarks recommended terrifying 20th century novels.


Literary Hub listed the books that have defined the 2010s (so far).



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

October 29, 2018

Michael J. Seidlinger's Playlist for His Novel "My Pet Serial Killer"

My Pet Serial Killer

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Michael J. Seidlinger's novel My Pet Serial Killer is inventive and surprising, one of the best literary horror novels of the year.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"This thoroughly unsettling novel is a cut above other serial-killer stories."


In his own words, here is Michael J. Seidlinger's Book Notes music playlist for his novel My Pet Serial Killer:



THE OFFICIAL MY PET SERIAL KILLER SOUNDTRACK

One of the most common responses to my book, My Pet Serial Killer, recently released by Fangoria, is that it reads a lot like a movie. This wasn’t an accident. One of the goals of writing the novel was to capture the filmic pace and language, the sort of ebb and flow that causes the reader to scan the page like how a viewer would a panning shot in a film: Your eyes seek detail and find horror in the subtlest details. So you bet when I set out to write this, I had a playlist which I imagined would complement some of the book’s most important scenes. The following playlist contains what would be the proverbial official soundtrack to the film adaptation, should money be no issue and fantasy be the name of the game. Thank you for reading.

Death Grips – Blackjack
Amnesia Scanner – AS Crust
Crosses – Bitches Brew
Michael Barr – Dark Kid
The Veils – Swimming with the Crocodiles
xxyyxx – DMT
Year of No Light – Tocsin
Everything in Slow Motion – Bad Season
Set to Stun – Staria I: Amadeus Rise!
The Black Queen – One Edge of Two
HEALTH – Hard to Be a God
The Midnight – Vampires
Death Therapy – Slow Dance (with Death)
Trifonic – Parks on Fire
White Lung – Kiss Me When I Bleed
Oneohtrix Point Never – We’ll Take It
Grails – Self-Hypnosis
The Blank Theory – Martyr
Rolo Tomassi – Rituals
LANY – The Breakup
Sidewalks and Skeletons – Feel Nothing
Blood Command – Ctrl + Alt + Delete
Darkest Hour – With a Thousand Words to Say But One
No Devotion – Night Drive
Ho99o9 – Kill All Rats
Trevor Something – Mind Games


Michael J. Seidlinger and My Pet Serial Killer links:

the author's website

Heavy Feather Review review
PANK review
Publishers Weekly review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Falter Kingdom
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for The Fun We've Had
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Mark Z. Danielewski's House of Leaves
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for The Strangest


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Kate Gavino's Playlist for Her Graphic Novel "Sanpaku"

Sanpaku

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Kate Gavino's graphic novel Sanpaku is a quirky and compelling coming of age story.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Marcine’s desire to find order in the confusing ordeals of adolescence resonates, and her cynical yet naive worldview provides a deadpan humor to a unique coming-of-age story."


In her own words, here is Kate Gavino's Book Notes music playlist for her graphic novel Sanpaku:



Sanpaku is a Japanese word that means “three whites,” and it describes the condition of being able to see the whites above or below your iris. Some people believe having sanpaku is a bad omen and a sign of severe imbalance in one’s body. In my book, my main character, Marcine, a 12 year old girl, becomes obsessed with the idea of sanpaku. She starts to see it everywhere – in her friends, family, celebrities – even herself. She sets out to cure the world of their sanpaku, and in the process, hits a lot of highs and lows in her junior high life. This playlist reflects that, along with the personalities of the various characters in the book and the setting: Houston, Texas in 1995.

Selena - Como La Flor
Selena is the musical patron saint of Sanpaku, which is set the year that she died. I love songs with upbeat, happy melodies and soul-crushing lyrics – “Como La Flor” is exactly that. The song is about a fleeting love that, despite its brevity, leaves a permanent mark. This is essentially what the idea of sanpaku is to Marcine.

Jens Lekman - It Was a Strange Time in My Life
Marcine’s theme song would have to be by Jens Lekman, who is my personal patron saint. Marcine is constantly observing, not always saying much. This song beautifully sums up the awkwardness of shyness and silence. People sometimes see you as a blank canvas and give you a personality based on their own assumptions. These people are usually assholes.

Pavement - The Killing Moon
The original version of this song is obviously great, but I like this cover simply for the “cucumber, cu-cu-cumber, ca-ca-ca-ca-cabbage” interlude. Plus this version sounds undeniably 90’s. The mysterious, eerie vibe of this song is what I imagine playing any time Marcine’s grandmother, Lola, makes an appearance. Marcine spends the book unraveling the secrets of her Lola’s life, and the more she learns, the more the mystery seems to deepen.

Ella del Rosario - O' Lumapit Ka
My dad’s favorite band is HotDog, a Filipino group from the '70s and '80s. He spent many road trips forcing us to listen to their tapes, and we ended up memorizing the Tagalog songs. Ella del Rosario sang lead on some of HotDog’s songs, including this one. The sound could be described as “pinoy bossa nova.” In Sanpaku, Marcine learns the story of how her Lola met her Lolo (grandfather), who was somewhat of a player. I can picture him getting ready for his dates with this song in the background, just dousing himself head to toe in Drakkar Noir.

Beat Happening - Godsend
I realize it’s weird to put an almost-10-minute song in the middle of a playlist, but here it is. In high school I thought this was the most romantic song in the world. Like most Beat Happening songs, the lyrics are super simple but ring true. I had this song in mind when I was thinking about the romance between Vilma, a woman who was about to be canonized into a saint, and Letty, the local nurse she fell in love with.

Weezer - Longtime Sunshine
I won’t lie: I was on the Weezer message board as a teen. This song was just a bootleg mp3 floating around at the time, and I thought it was so deep. Now I think the lyrics are kind of funny, and I can imagine it speaking to Kip, a classmate of Marcine’s who is also desperate to cure his sanpaku. He’s a bit self-indulgent and dramatic, just like this song – just like anyone who was on the Weezer message board, well into the time they released Make Believe.

Fiona Apple - Shadowboxer
When I picture the childhood bedroom I shared with my sister, I smell Bath & Body Works’ “Crisp Orchard Leaves” fragrance mist, and I hear Fiona Apple. This song in particular was my jam, even though I couldn’t relate to it at all. (“Once my lover, now my friend…” what would that line mean to a 12 year old who still couldn’t master long division?) Despite this, the song pumped me up and made me angry, in a good way. I picture it empowering Marcine to do something like shoplift or flip off security cameras. Fiona Apple had that effect on me.

Destiny’s Child - So Good
The book takes place in Houston in 1995, and this song came out in 1999, so I imagine a grown up Marcine playing this song as a (hopefully) better adjusted teen, as she’s driving to the Galleria, on her way to her summer job, folding jeans at Express.


Kate Gavino and Sanpaku links:

the author's website

Publishers Weekly review

The Nerds of Color interview with the author
Paste interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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