January 30, 2019

Shorties (Chloe Aridjis on Her New Novel, A New Song from Perfume Genius & Empress Of, and more)

Chloe Aridjis

Chloe Aridjis discussed her novel Sea Monsters with The Rumpus.


Stream a new song by Perfume Genius and Empress Of.


January's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for$1.99 today:

History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund
Night Film by Marisha Pessl


Stream a new song by E.B the Younger.


Rain Taxi interviewed author Robert Kloss.


Stream a new song by Avey Tare.


Pam Houston discussed her memoir Deep Creek with Longreads.


Paste listed the best albums of 1969.


Stephanie Land talked about her memoir Maid with Fresh Air.


The Charleston City Paper profiled the Drive-By Truckers.


Buzzfeed shared an excerpt from one of 2019's best books, Esmé Weijun Wang's essay collection, The Collected Schizophrenias.


Stream a new song by Samia.


Entropy interviewed author Morris Collins.


Stream two new Deer Tick songs.


The Guardian recommended books about the Irish Troubles.


Beach Slang covered Bob Mould's "I Hate Alternative Rock."


The Rumpus Poetry Book Club interviewed poet Sally Wen Mao.


Stream a new Mekons song.


Stream a new Josh Ritter song.


Katharine Smyth recommended five books about fathers at BookMarks.


Chatham County Line covered Beck's "Think I'm in Love."



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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January 29, 2019

Dana Czapnik's Playlist for Her Novel "The Falconer"

The Falconer

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Dana Czapnik's debut novel The Falconer is a compelling and lyrical coming-of-age story.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"Coming-of-age in Manhattan may not have been done this brilliantly since Catcher in the Rye. . . . Get ready to fall in love."


In her own words, here is Dana Czapnik's Book Notes music playlist for her debut novel The Falconer:



Lucy Adler’s 1994 Mix Tape


She’s Crafty – Beastie Boys

“Her name is Lucy but they all call her Loose,” is one of the opening lines of this track. I named Lucy Adler, the protagonist of The Falconer, after the antagonist in this song – a shady girl, potentially a prostitute, definitely a thief, who steals the Boys’ hearts. Lucy Adler has nothing in common with the eponymous Lucy Loose of the song, but everything about this song captures the energy of being young and unencumbered in late '80s and early '90s New York, the New York that Lucy lives in. The opening riff, sampled from Led Zeppelin's “The Ocean” and reimagined by the Beasties, is the beat I thought of most when writing the opening basketball scene in The Falconer - the worn out sneakers on the blacktop, the pace of the action, and the scrappy, sweaty sexiness there too. Even though Lucy would have found this song to be sexist on an intellectual level, on an emotional level, she would have swooned if some boy proclaimed his love for her by shouting, “she’s crafty and she’s just my type!”

Sweet Jane – The Velvet Underground

I’ll be honest here, I have no idea what this song is about. Yet I don’t know if there’s another song that captures the kinetic energy that I imagine must have ruled the day in New York in the late sixties and early seventies. Lou Reed sounds so pure and young here. Part of what The Falconer reckons with is the anger and resentment of a small generation of young kids living in the shadow of the generation that preceded them – the one that simultaneously birthed the Beats and Bob Dylan and Ken Kesey’s Merry Band of Pranksters and the Beatles and The Who and The Ramones and The Velvet Underground and the punk and the pop and the drugs and the free love and then allowed all that creativity and fun to morph into the greed and excess that sabotaged their children’s financial and environmental future. “Sweet Jane” represents the purest part of that moment: the art, the freedom. Put this on your iPhone or whatever tiny digital music listening contraption you now have and walk any street in New York. It will no longer be the new New York, filled with chain stores and tall, glass anonymous buildings half-owned by Russian oligarchs, but Lou Reed’s New York. The one where plumes of strawberry colored hashish smoke rise out of the subway station and give everyone a contact high. “Sweet Jane” is a time machine for me… to a time I never got to experience.

Yellow Ledbetter – Pearl Jam

I bought this song as a single at my local HMV. You couldn’t find it on an album, which meant it was special. Singles were a major extravagance. If an individual album cost about $11 and it had 11 songs on it, that meant you were paying a dollar per song plus tax. But a single could cost up to $7 or more if it was a highly coveted live or foreign recording. It better be a pretty amazing song if you were going to drop that much cash. I don’t think anyone knows what this song is about – Vedder’s totally unintelligible here – but it’s got some indefinable, nebulous teenage melancholy and ache in it. Adolescence is tough, sometimes for no good reason. This song captures that inexplicable anger and sadness of youth. That opening and closing acoustic guitar riff, too, provides a morphine drip of instant nostalgia for me. I’d bet I’m not the only one.

Things Done Changed – The Notorious B.I.G.

When Biggie’s first album Ready to Die dropped, it took over all the airwaves in New York. “Juicy,” “Big Poppa,” and “One More Chance” were in constant rotation. But this jam off the same album was rarely played on the radio, if ever. As far as I know, it’s the only political rap he recorded and he didn’t pull any punches here. A quote from “Things Done Changed” appears in the novel to put into stark relief for Lucy the divide between the two New Yorks – the haves and the have nots - which also intersect the fault line of race. In the early 90’s, New York’s murder rate was declining, but it was still common to hear of or witness shootings and muggings in every borough. It was also the era of Gangsta Rap, and this song with its killer hook, and deft lyricism, is both a glorification and rebuke of that culture.

Precious Things – Tori Amos

This song burns the myths of femininity to the ground and shows no mercy. “Precious Things” is as much about Amos’s own frailty, her own fragility, her anger at herself for eating the shit that’s been served her as much as it is about the cultural institutions that cause girls and women to be happy with whatever morsels of attention boys give to make them feel seen. It’s about rejecting the idea of being a good girl and about how good “Christian boys” aren’t always particularly good, especially when it comes to girls. It’s about not being pretty and fighting against the invisibility that comes with that. It’s about how girls can be cruel to each other, the “little fascist panties tucked into the heart of every nice girl.” This is a Sylvia Plath poem with synthesizers. What are the precious things that we should let bleed and break? The idea that sex is sacred and important for girls, but not for boys. The idea that you have to be agreeable to be seen as attractive.

Chelsea Morning – Joni Mitchell

This song is about the morning in the city when it’s the beginning of summer and the sun starts to pour into your tiny apartment through the window you keep neglecting to buy shades for and you can see all the dust particles floating around and you think the word ‘stardust’ instead of ‘dirty’ and you’re lying next to your lover on a mattress on the ground because you can’t afford a real bed and you decide it makes it all more intimate and he touches you and the world changes color and all around you are books and trinkets you’ve picked up in flea markets and cheap art fairs and that is probably the reason why you can’t afford a proper bed or shades but you prefer the art and the books and the trinkets anyway and the white paint is chipping on the walls in some spots and is peeling away in whole sections in others and who cares because it adds character and you feel incredibly very very good about every single goddamn choice you’ve ever made in your life because it brought you to this moment when the sun is pouring over your body in your tiny apartment and someone’s yelling outside down on the street and it sounds like music. That’s what this song is.

Shoop – Salt-n-Pepa

We take for granted now that women rappers can spit rhymes about sex and be just as X-rated in verse as their male counterparts. None of this is revolutionary anymore. But Salt-n-Pepa were doing that when NO ONE else was. They are the first ladies of raunch. “Shoop” came out at the same time Gangsta Rap hit the scene, when every woman was a “bitch” or a “ho” and were wearing daisy dukes and tiny bikinis in videos. Salt-n-Pepa turned the tables. They objectified men in their videos and talked about sex and enjoyed themselves while doing it. That’s why every woman over the age of 35 can sing every lyric to this song to this day. It is an anthem.

Downtown Train – Tom Waits

There are lots of Tom Waits songs that are poetic and full of longing and feel like a warm rainy night in New York. But this one speaks to me the most. The funny thing is, I’ve been misinterpreting this song for decades. The line “You wave your hand and they scatter like crows, They have nothing that will ever capture your heart, They're just thorns without the rose…” well, in Tom Waits’ garbled voice, it always sounded like he’s singing “I have nothing that will ever capture your heart, just thorns without the rose,” which means I’ve always thought the song was about unrequited love. I prefer my version. There’s something holy and timeless about riding the subway late at night, observing the passengers giggling together in their going out clothes while you lament the disappointment you just experienced at some bar where it became clear the boy or girl you went to see wasn’t interested. Who among us hasn’t felt like thorns without the rose?

Electric Relaxation – A Tribe Called Quest

My love for “Electric Relaxation” is infinite. It is the smoothest, sexiest hip hop track ever recorded. I’ve also misinterpreted the lyrics to this track for many years only to have my bubble burst. In the second verse Phife Dawg raps “A pretty lil’ sumthin’ on the New York Street…” I’ve always thought he said “gritty” instead of “pretty.” I think of all the characters in The Falconer as ‘gritty lil’ sumthins’, even if only in their imaginations. In New York, pretty and gritty are interchangeable. It’s the grittiness that makes it pretty. I imagine this track blasting out of Lucy’s boom box on her tar roof while she and her friend and baller teammate Alexis get stoned in late June when the city hasn’t yet turned into a sweaty inferno but is on the verge, bobbing their heads silently to the beat, feeling very confident, sexy, and untouchable.

Waterloo Sunset – The Kinks

I know this is a song from a different time, about a different city, but it lovingly remembers being young, a little lonely, and wandering aimlessly through your hometown, which is thematically fits right in with the book I wrote. It is a song sung in the tense of past perfect.


Dana Czapnik and The Falconer links:

excerpt from the book

Entertainment Weekly review
Kirkus review
New York Times review
Newsday review
NPR Books review

amNY interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Largehearted Boy List of Online "Best Books of 2018" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Maurice Carlos Ruffin's Playlist for His Novel "We Cast a Shadow"

We Cast a Shadow

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Maurice Carlos Ruffin's impressive novel We Cast a Shadow is a bold, timely, and important debut.

The Boston Globe wrote of the book:

"We Cast a Shadow is like a dispatch from the frontlines of the African-American psyche. Written with ruthless intelligence, it’s the story of a father’s love and how he tries to protect his son in a country that devours black lives through violence, incarceration, and poverty. . . . [Ruffin] can drive his story to the outer limits and beyond, and never lose the threads of bitter reality that make it so haunting. We Cast a Shadow soars on Ruffin’s unerring vision."


In his own words, here is Maurice Carlos Ruffin's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel We Cast a Shadow:



“Etoile Polaire (North Star)” and “Are Years What? (For Marianne Moore)" by Philip Glass

I tend to write cinematically. The opening scene of the book has North Star playing behind it. The screen is black. You see twinkling lights, the scene comes into focus, and you see the interior of that mansion. It’s a party. That’s when you meet the Narrator leaning against the wall, pensively drinking. The other song is part of the soundtrack you hear whenever the Narrator is driving alone or plotting what to do about his son.

“All of the Lights” by Kanye West

This was an early alternate title of the book! The story is about wanting to give your child a good life just like in the song. But there are complications. Also, Kanye is a demigod of confidence. Whenever I felt stuck, I asked myself “what would Kanye do.” The answer was always the same: whatever he wanted.

“Pursuit of Happiness” by Kid Cudi

The lyrics, the tone, the video. They all say a good bit about what the Narrator is trying to accomplish and what he’s experiencing.

“Heartlines” by Florence + the Machine

Yes, every family is dysfunctional in its own way. But this is what the Narrator’s family feels like when things are going well.

“God Only Knows” by The Beach Boys

The family sings this during their trip. It’s a high moment where everything feels right with the world.

“Sawdust & Diamonds” by Joanna Newsom

The Narrator’s heart in a song. Also, Newsom is the artist who most consistently makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up. She works with beauty and mortality to great effect. I used these ingredients copiously in the construction of the book.

“Disparate Youth” by Santigold

This is Araminta’s theme song. I often play it as I’m about to do a public reading. It tells me that my ancestors are with me and whether or not things work out, I will make my presence known.

“Butterfly, How Long It Takes to Die” by Flaming Lips

I heard this song right around the time my dad got terminally ill. It immediately struck as the sound of everything going wrong. This is one of favorite bands, and I didn’t even consider going to their tour of the album this song is on because it’s so dark. I infused the book with this mood many times. (And went to the Lips next tour.)

“Little Rhymes” by Mercury Rev

The Narrator is on a mission he doesn’t think anyone understands, and he uses a variety of techniques to dull the pain he feels.

“Disintegration” by The Cure

The Narrator is an emotional goth and this song represents an aspect of his consciousness very well.

“A Strange Flower for Birds and Butterflies” by Holly Roadfeldt

This brilliant classical song encompasses so many of the moods of the book. It is energetic, pensive, ephemeral.


Maurice Carlos Ruffin and We Cast a Shadow links:

the author's website

Booklist review
Boston Globe review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review

New Orleans Advocate profile of the author
Driftwood interview with the author
Nola.com profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Largehearted Boy List of Online "Best Books of 2018" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (An Interview with Alice Kopf, An Interview with Mirah, and more)

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BOMB interviewed author Alicia Kopf.


The Creative Independent interviewed Mirah.


85 "best books of 2018" lists were added to Largehearted Boy's master aggregation last week (bringing the total to 1,487), including Clash Magazine’s best music books and Graphic Policy’s best comics.


Largehearted Boy's essential and interesting 2018 year-end music lists (updated daily).


January's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for$1.99 today:

Hell's Angels by Hunter S. Thompson
Idaho by Emily Ruskovich


Rolling Stone interviewed Neil Young.


Thrillist previewed 2019's best books.


Psychology Today reported that anger and sadness are on the rise in pop lyrics.


Treble interviewed Cherry Glazerr's Clementine Creevy.


Haaretz interviewed author Etgar Keret.


Blood Orange played a Tiny Desk Concert.


Electric Literature recommended books about the beginnings of countries.


Stream a new HEALTH song.


Literary Hub shared two poems from Hala Alyan's collection The Twenty-Ninth Year.


Noisey shared a brief history of pop music's obsession with the age of seventeen.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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January 28, 2019

Steph Post's Playlist for Her Novel "Miraculum"

Miraculum

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Steph Post's novelMiraculum impressively melds Southern Gothic and magical realism into an unforgettable feat of storytelling.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"This is a tale brimming with imagination and rich in melancholy as it pits the natural against the supernatural and touches on what it means to be human. Great fare for fans of gothic fiction or simply good storytelling."


In her own words, here is Steph Post's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Miraculum:



Out of all the novels I’ve written (and I’m just now starting on number six), Miraculum is the most closely linked to music for me. If "Stadium Arcadium" pops up on a playlist—even now, three years after writing Miraculum—I’m transported back to the haunted wastes of the "Star Light." Hans Zimmer’s score for Interstellar will forever be intertwined with the complicated relationship between Ruby and Daniel, just as Trevor Morris’ soundtrack for The Pillars of the Earth will always remind me of Hayden.

I’ve been lucky enough to put together a few of these novel playlists now and every time I try to do something a little different. Miraculum is a special book for a host of reasons, and so I’m trusting the reader, and listener, on this one. Interstellar’s soundtrack doesn’t relate to Miraculum because somehow carnivals and space travel made a connection in my head, but rather because while I was writing Miraculum, I discovered the film score and it fit perfectly with a scene I was developing. This playlist, then, is more of a musical odyssey through my experience of constructing and experiencing Miraculum—a window into what I see in my mind when I close my eyes and listen.

"Stadium Arcadium" - Red Hot Chili Peppers
This song embodies the spirit of the Star Light Miraculum itself. I see a place that was once full of dreams, now made desolate by the harsh realities of the secrets exposed behind the curtain. I see a lonely midway, windswept, wanting someone with a little bit of hope to find the beauty it still harbors.

"Coward" - Hanz Zimmer (Interstellar)
There is no way I can hear this piece without seeing Daniel and Ruby facing off. I don’t want to give too much of the plot away, but let’s just say that two of the biggest scenes in the book between them were written with my headphones in and "Coward" on repeat. All I can see are hands and eyes and stars and so much tension.

"Tom Builder’s Inspiration" - Trevor Morris (The Pillars of the Earth)
Every time I hear this piece, I think of Hayden, sitting underneath the big top, sketching. In some ways, Hayden is an outsider to the carnival world—like us—and so he’s able to convey a sense of awe and wonder in a more honest way than our resident stranger, Daniel. I see the light filtering through the tent flaps, dust motes in the sunlight, Hayden’s face uplifted, trying to capture some of the grandeur with paper and charcoal.

"Promontory" - Trevor Jones (The Last of the Mohicans)
I’m a huge fan of film scores, if you hadn’t noticed, and for the most part this is the only type of music that I can listen to while writing (though I’ve also gotten into videogame scores as of late). If "Coward" is the anthem for Ruby and Daniel, then "Promontory" is the theme song for Ruby’s relationship with Hayden. Their dueling senses of pride, in particular, are wrapped up in this piece. I wouldn’t say it relates to one scene, but rather to the entire rollercoaster between them.

Nocturnes, Op. 9: No. 1 in B-Flat Minor - Frederic Chopin
This piece is actually referenced in Miraculum, as Daniel listens to it while sitting alone in his wagon, contemplating a hard choice. It’s the only time we catch Daniel absolutely by himself and see him without any pretense at all, so I think it stands for the best representation of his true self. I see him sitting with the gramophone behind his head, eyes closed, trying to decide about Ruby.

"Astronomic Club" - Air
Georges Melies’ famous silent film Le Voyage Dans la Lune (A Trip to the Moon), while only briefly mentioned in Miraculum, signals a turning point in the game between Daniel and Ruby. In one scene, Daniel expounds upon his love for Melies’ films and in doing research for the book, I discovered a version of Le Voyage Dans la Lune recently scored by the French band Air to be shown at the Cannes film festival. Air was already one of my favorite bands and this ‘collaboration’ of sorts is brilliant. Air produced an entire album to accompany the film, but just hearing the openings notes of "Astronomic Club" makes me see Daniel’s hands, waving about excitedly in the dark as he talks about his love for Melies.

"Whispering Grass" - The Ink Spots
So, it might seem like this playlist is dominated by Daniel, but he is a larger-than-life character, so it couldn’t really be any other way. In the very early stages of planning out Miraculum, I heard this song and immediately thought of Daniel, driving along, causing havoc and destruction with a smile on his face. The scene I played out in my head eventually was reduced to only a side note in Miraculum, but I still see Daniel behind the wheel of his Model A as he drives away from the carnival, Whispering Grass playing in the background.

"The Joke" - Brandi Carlile
If we started with the Starlight, it’s only fitting to end with the centrifugal force of the carnival itself, Ruby. I only just recently discovered this song and, to be honest, it’s one of those pieces that just stabs me in the heart every time I hear it. Definitely not for casual listening. But three years after creating Ruby’s character, I finally found the song that defines her in a way no other has. For all the supernatural elements in Miraculum, it’s really just the story of a woman who has been tossed aside by the world and yet who keeps getting up from the dust, keeps coming back to stand tall, determined to show the world that the joke’s really on them.


Steph Post and Miraculum links:

the author's website

Booklist review
Kirkus review
Library Journal review
Wilmington Star News review

Book Riot interview with the author
Clea Simon interview with the author
The Coil interview with the author
Entertainment Weekly profile of the author
The Rumpus interview with the author
Tampa Bay Times profile of the author
Writer's Bone interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Largehearted Boy List of Online "Best Books of 2018" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (An Excerpt from Tracey Thorn's New Memoir, A New Mountain Goats Song, and more)

Tracey Thorn

The Guardian shared an excerpt from Tracey Thorn's memoir Another Planet: A Teenager in Suburbia.

Thorn also talked to the Guardian about the book.


Stream a new Mountain Goats song.


85 "best books of 2018" lists were added to Largehearted Boy's master aggregation last week (bringing the total to 1,487), including Clash Magazine’s best music books and Graphic Policy’s best comics.


Largehearted Boy's essential and interesting 2018 year-end music lists (updated daily).


January's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for$1.99 today:

The Best Kind of People by Zoe Whittall
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee by Dee Brown


Sheila E. shared her memories of working with Prince at The Current.


Paste recommended January['s best books.


Stream a new Hayes Carll song.


Jamil Jan Kochai talked about his novel 99 Nights in Logar with Weekend Edition.


Paste profiled the Irish band Pillow Queens.


Dani Shapiro discussed her memoir Inheritance with the New York Times Book Review podcast.


Paste recommended folk musicians yu should know in 2019.


The Guardian profiled author Kristen Roupenian.


Stream a new song (that features Cat Power) from Lou Doillon.


The New Yorker interviewed Emma Cline about her story in this week's issue.


Steam a new CFCF song.


Poet Tracy K. Smith shared her daily schedule with the New York Times.


Stream a new song by Thyla.


The Quietus shared an excerpt from Wayne Holloway’s novel Bindlestiff.


The Millions interviewed author Chuck Palahniuk.


Guernica interviewed author Joyce Carol Oates.


Entropy interviewed author Matthew Binder.


Of Books and Bookworms recommended February's best books.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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January 27, 2019

Favorite Albums of 2018

Largehearted Boy's Favorite Albums of 2018

Music and poetry helped me deal with a politically tumultuous 2018.

These are the eleven albums I have recommended most to friends, Largehearted Boy readers, and complete strangers over the year. (my personal metric for favorite music).

My favorite album of the year was Mitski's surprisingly synth-laden and lyrically powerful Mitski's Be the Cowboy.

Stream these albums on Spotify:



My favorite eleven albums of 2018:


Anna Calvi: Hunter


boygenius: boygenius EP


The Beths: Future Me Hates Me


Hookworms: Microshift


Julia Holter: Aviary


Low: Double Negative


Mitski: Be the Cowboy


No Age: Snares Like a Haircut


Screaming Females: All at Once


Soccer Mommy: Clean


U.S. Girls: In a Poem Unlimited


also at Largehearted Boy:

List of essential and interesting 2018 year-end music lists

2017 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2016 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2015 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2010 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2009 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2008 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2007 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2006 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2005 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2004 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2003 Largehearted Favorite Albums
2002 Largehearted Favorite Albums

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January 25, 2019

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - January 25, 2019

William Tyler

Mono's Nowhere Now Here, Sarah Louise's Nighttime Birds And Morning Stars, and William Tyler's Goes West are the albums I can wholeheartedly recommend this week.

Also available is a Big Star live performance.


This week's interesting music releases:


Anderson .Paak: Oxnard [vinyl]
Backstreet Boys: DNA
Big Star: Live on WLIR
Blood Red Shoes: Get Tragic
Blue Oyster Cult: Some Enchanted Evening Legacy Edition (reissue with bonus tracks) [vinyl]
Bring Me the Horizon: amo
Bruce Springsteen: Springsteen on Broadway (4-LP box set) [vinyl]
The Dandy Warhols: Why You So Crazy
DAWN: new breed
Doors: Stockholm '68
Eagles of Death Metal: Death By Sexy (reissue) [vinyl]
Earl Sweatshirt: Some Rap Songs [vinyl]
Eric Dolphy: Musical Prophet: The Expanded 1963 New York Studio Sessions (3-CD box set)
FIDLAR: Almost Free
Grateful Dead: Road Trips Vol. 3 No. 4 - Penn State/Cornell '80
Iggy Pop: New Values (reissue) [vinyl]
Indigo Girls: Indigo Girls (reissue) [vinyl]
Keuning: Prismism
KISS: KISSWORLD - The Best Of KISS
Kid Koala: Music to Draw To: Io
Lil Wayne: Tha Carter 5 [vinyl]
Meghan Trainor: Treat Myself
Michael Franti & Spearhead: Stay Human, Vol. II
Mike Krol: Power Chords
Mono: Nowhere Now Here
Nils Frahm: Encores 2
Rat Boy: Internationally Unknown
The Residents: Commercial Album pREServed Edition (reissue and expanded)
The Residents: Eskimo pREServed Edition (reissue and expanded)
Rival Sons: Feral Roots
Santana: In Search of Mona Lisa EP
Sarah Louise: Nighttime Birds And Morning Stars
Say Anything: Oliver Appropriate
Sneaks: Highway Hypnosis
Sponge: Demoed in Detroit
Steve Hackett: At The Edge Of Light
Swervedriver: Future Ruins
TOY: Happy In The Hollow
Various Artists: 2019 Grammy Nominees
Various Artists: Love Actually (soundtrack) [vinyl]
Various Artists: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel: Season 1 Music From The Prime Original Series
William Tyler: Goes West


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily book and music news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

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Shorties (Spring's Most Anticipated Books, Cherry Glazerr's Clementine Creevy Profiled, and more)

Cherry Glazerr

Publishers Weekly recommended spring's most anticipated books.


The Los Angeles Times profiled Cherry Glazerr's Clementine Creevy.


85 "best books of 2018" lists were added to Largehearted Boy's master aggregation last week (bringing the total to 1,487), including Clash Magazine’s best music books and Graphic Policy’s best comics.


Largehearted Boy's essential and interesting 2018 year-end music lists (updated daily).


January's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for$2.99 today:

Tell Them of Battles, Kings, and Elephants by Mathias Enard

eBooks on sale for$1.99 today:

Don't Panic: Douglas Adams & The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Neil Gaiman


Stream a new song by Hand Habits (Meg Duffy).


The Christian Science Monitor listed January's best books.


Conor Oberst and Phoebe Bridgers discussed their new band, Better Oblivion Community Center, with Paste.


T Fleischmann discussed their memoir, Time Is the Thing a Body Moves Through (one of my favorite books of the year so far), with Publishers Weekly.


Guernica interviewed author Anelise Chen.


Bookworm interviewed author Diane Williams.


The Rumpus interviewed author Tyrese Coleman.


Stream a new Lambchop song.


Mesha Maren discussed her debut novel, Sugar Run, with Debutiful.


Stream a new song by Disq.


The Rumpus interviewed poet Ruth Baumann.


Stream a new Half Japanese song.


Stream a new song by Mini Dresses.


Stream two new songs by Florence + the Machine.


Stream a new song by Bellows.


The Tampa Bay Times interviewed singer-songwriter Lucinda Williams.


Noisey ranked every popular song named after an alcoholic drink.


Stream a new Kurt Vile song.


John Vanderslice discussed his Tiny Television recording studio with KALW.


The Creative Independent interviewed musician Sarah Louise.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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January 24, 2019

Shorties (Elizabeth McCracken on Books and Reading, Stream the New Girlpool Album, and more)

Bowlaway

Elizabeth McCracken talked books and reading with the New York Times.


NPR Music is streaming Girlpool's new album, What Chaos Is Imaginary.


85 "best books of 2018" lists were added to Largehearted Boy's master aggregation last week (bringing the total to 1,487), including Clash Magazine’s best music books and Graphic Policy’s best comics.


Largehearted Boy's essential and interesting 2018 year-end music lists (updated daily).


January's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for$1.99 today:

Invaders: 22 Tales from the Outer Limits of Literature edited by W. P. Kinsella and Jim Shepard


Middle Kids visited Drowned in Sound for an interview and live performance.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Sam Pink.


Stream Weezer's surprise new covers album.


The Big Smoke interviewed author Gabino Iglesias.


Stream a new Ryan Adams songs.


Stream a new song by Jenny Lewis.


Book Riot recommended recently published books in translation.


Beck covered Colourbox's "Tarantula."


Rain Taxi profiled poet and publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti.


Stream a new Y La Bamba song.


Entropy interviewed poet Nomi Stone.


Stream two Bobbie Gentry covers by Mercury Rev.


The New Yorker looked back on Mackenzie Bezos' novels.


Stream two new Vampire Weekend songs.


Stream a new song by Lady Lamb.


Phoebe Bridgers and Conor Oberst's self-titled album as Better Oblivion Community Center has been released.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

January 23, 2019

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - January 23rd, 2019

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Bookends: Collected Intros and Outro

Bookends: Collected Intros and Outro by Michael Chabon

Here’s a format we’ve never seen before: an anthology of introductions (and postscripts, plus some liner notes) written for other books. It’s an appropriately “meta” concept for the ever-playful Chabon, and surveying the range of intros here (for the Wes Anderson Collection, a book on superhero fashion, Ben Katchor’s graphic novel Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer, M.R. James’ ghost stories, and D’Aulaire’s Norse Myths, among other things) gives you a sense of Chabon’s kaleidoscopically varied sensibility and genre-busting enthusiasms.


Tentacle

Tentacle by Rita Indiana

Rita Indiana is something of a superstar in the Domican Republic, where she is beloved not only for her novels, but also as the bandleader of neo-merengue group Rita Indiana & Los Misterios and an outspoken advocate for queer issues. Her latest novel, Tentacle (which won the Grand Prize of the Association of Caribbean Writers in 2017), follows a young maid in post-apocalyptic Santa Domingo who finds herself in the middle of a Santeria prophecy that demands she travel back in time, save the oceans and humanity, and change her sex with the help of a sacred Anemone. It’s The Tempest as a telenovela!


Last Night in Nuuk

Last Night in Nuuk by Niviaq Korneliussen

Niviaq Korneliussen is a groundbreaking young writer from Greenland whose debut novel follows the lives of five young people in the capital city of Nuuk (population: 17,000). Queer, urbane, studded with stream-of-consciousnness textspeak, and delirious from nightlife, Last Night in Nuuk is a brave book that’s earned comparisons to Irvine Welsh’s Trainspotting and promises to put Greenlandic literature on the map.


The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1900 to the Present

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1900 to the Present by David Treuer

Responding to and refuting the mythology of the “vanishing Indian” that has dominated the settler imagination and the writing of American history, David Treuer’s The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee aims at nothing less than a comprehensive retelling of Indigenous history. Blending history, memoir, and reportage, Treuer (an Ojibwe of Leech Lake, MN) documents how colonial violence has spawned new forms of survival and resistance in each era. A major work.


Reproduction

Reproduction by Ian Williams

Reproduction is the debut novel from award-winning Canadian poet (and UBC Creative Writing prof) Ian Williams. It’s a restless, unsentimental, formally inventive story about the often bizarre ways in which people become bonded. A teen girl from an island nation and the lazy heir of a wealthy German family come together over shared grief and simple proximity. Years later, their son forms an unconventional unit with the neighbours: a divorced father, his odd son, and nubile daughter. As the group is reshuffled by death, disease, violence, and desire, Williams illuminates how families are not always born out of blood or even love, at least not on the surface.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's website
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (The Top Musical Novels, A New Toro Y Moi Mixtape, and more)

The Gunners

Author Rebecca Kaufman recommended musical novels at the Guardian.


Toro Y Moi shared a new mixtape.


85 "best books of 2018" lists were added to Largehearted Boy's master aggregation last week (bringing the total to 1,487), including Clash Magazine’s best music books and Graphic Policy’s best comics.


Largehearted Boy's essential and interesting 2018 year-end music lists (updated daily).


January's best eBook deals.

eBooks on sale for$1.99 today:

The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben


Stream a new song by MUNYA.


The Heavy Feather Review interviewed author and filmmaker Julia Madsen.


Relix profiled Jeff Tweedy.


Glamour listed the best books of 2019 (so far).


Stream a new song by Jessica Pratt.


The Creative Independent interviewed poet Matthew Rohrer.


Stream a new Son Volt song.


Book Riot recommended graphic novels and memoirs for people who don't like graphic novels and memoirs.


Stream a new Spiral Stairs song.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Dani Shapiro's memoir Inheritance.


Stream a recent live set by Joan Shelley.


Elizabeth McCracken discussed her debut novel Bowlaway with The Rumpus.


Aquarium Drunkard interviewed guitarist William Tyler.


Literary Hub interviewed author Maurice Ruffin.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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