September 14, 2016

Book Notes - Gina Frangello "Every Kind of Wanting"

Every Kind of Wanting

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Gina Frangello's second novel Every Kind of Wanting is a stunning look at contemporary extended family.

The Millions wrote of the book:

"Each unhappy family is unhappy in it's own way, but the families in Frangello's latest novel are truly in a category all their own. Every Kind of Wanting maps the intersection of four Chicago couples as they fall into an impressively ambitious fertility scheme in the hopes of raising a "community baby." But first there are family secrets to reveal, abusive pasts to decipher, and dangerous decisions to make. If it sounds complicated, well, it is, but behind all the potential melodrama is a story that takes a serious look at race, class, sexuality, and loyalty — in short, at the new American family."


In her own words, here is Gina Frangello's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Every Kind of Wanting:


Every Kind of Wanting is a novel told through five characters' perspectives…though their points of view may all be being imagined by one narrator, Lina, depending on how you read the book.

When I'm deep in writing a novel, pretty much every song on the radio or on my phone reminds me of someone from that particular book. Here are some of the ones that consistently came up as embodying certain characters and their situations…



Lina:

Angelina (Lina) Guerra is thirty, twice-divorced, bisexual, a voracious reader and a former stripper. Lina is in recovery and has bipolar, and tends to think of herself as a "wrecking ball." In a waning relationship with her strongly feminist, sex-positive former English professor, Lina loves Kate Braverman, Neruda and Lucy Grealy, and is an "outsider" in the central plot of the novel, which involves three couples coming together (or failing to come together, as the case may be) to have a "community baby" through a gestational surrogacy. Lina's narration often takes the form of an epistolary apology to her former lover, Nick, the surrogate's husband.

"The Moth," Aimee Man
"So Much Wine," The Handsome Family
"Born to Die," Lana Del Rey
"In Praise of the Fucked-Up Girl," The Urinals


Miguel:

Lina's older brother (sort of), Miguel Guerra is one of the two aspiring fathers in the community baby plan. Miguel was chronically abused by his own father, who died under mysterious circumstances around the time of Lina's birth. Miguel struggles, throughout the novel, with what it means to become a father when the models of fatherhood in his life have been so destructive…but even more acutely, he struggles with what it means to want something—and someone—badly, and to dare to take emotional risks to attain his desires, rather than numbing out and detaching in order to shield himself from disappointment and heartache.

"Hurt," Johnny Cash
"Indifference," Pearl Jam
"The Leaning Tree," Sun Kil Moon
"Depeche Mode," Strange Love


Nick:

Lina's lover, and the surrogate's (Emily's) husband, Nick is also the father of two sons, one of whom has cerebral palsy and is, ultimately, the center of his life. Sexually and psychologically obsessed with Lina, bored and frustrated in a marriage that began too young due to unwed pregnancy, and stagnant in his career as a playwright who fails to earn enough money for his family, Nick's story is ultimately about the push-pull between self-sacrifice and the selfish pursuit of excitement and joy…and the various kinds of loss that can occur as part of either decision.

"School Night," Ani DiFranco
"I Remember," Damien Rice
"Ava Adore," Smashing Pumpkins
"Dark End of the Street, "Cat Power


Emily:

Emily, who grew up in poverty with a bitter single mother and aspired to a better life, is now the successful vice principal of a charter school, and a highly competent mother and wife who is—for reasons inexplicable to everyone in her life—putting her own life on hold to serve as the gestational "vessel" for the community baby. Though she appears almost saintly to others, Emily has a tumultuous inner life in which she wrestles with major questions of good and evil, regret, and the limits of love.

"Devil Song, "Beth Orton
"Jamaica Inn," Tori Amos
"Between Us," The Violet Rays
"Down on Mission Street," Lloyd Cole & the Commotions


Gretchen:

Gretchen Merry-Underwood is the egg donor in the community baby plan, as well as the older sister of Miguel's husband, Chad. A child of wealth and privilege, Gretchen is facing a vitriolic divorce from her gas-lighting husband, and grief over the emotional limits of her relationship with both her self-absorbed parents and her young son, who may have Asperger's Syndrome. After 41 years of doing what was expected of her, with little to show for it but a growing dependence on vodka, Gretchen finds herself involved in two potential custody battles, and has to decide, with enormous stakes, exactly what kind of person she wants to be.

"The Life You Chose," Jason Isbell
"Rabbit Heart (Raise It Up), "Florence + The Machine
"Come Undone," Duran Duran
"Between the Bars," Elliot Smith


Gina Frangello and Every Kind of Wanting links:

the author's website

Chicago Review of Books review
Kirkus review

Carolineleavittville interview with the author
Chicago Magazine interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for A Life in Men
Largehearted Book Notes playlist by the author for Slut Lullabyes
Midnight Breakfast interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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September 14, 2016

Shorties (The 2016 National Book Award for Poetry Shortlist, Every Bruce Springsteen Song Ranked, and more)

The 2016 National Book Award for Poetry shortlist has been announced.


Caryn Rose ranked every Bruce Springsteen song at Vulture.


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Flight by Sherman Alexie
The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell
The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy
We're All Damaged by Matthew Norman


eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Elephant's Journey by Jose Saramago
Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin


Stream a new Purling Hiss song.


Mac Barnett shared the experience of having David Foster Wallace as a creative writing tutor.


Stream a song from a new Mekons tribute album.


The Bookseller gathered critical opinions of the 2016 Man Booker Prize shortlist.


Lou Barlow covered Peter Gabriel's "In Your Eyes."


The Telegraph previewed fall's best books, music, television, and more.


Stream two new Crying songs.


Vulture interviewed Alan Moore about his new novel Jerusalem.


Billy Bragg and Joe Henry stopped by World Cafe for a live performance and interview.


Read the full text of Lionel Shriver's controversial speech on cultural appropriation.


Stream a video of Bruce Springsteen reading from his autobiography Born to Run.


The Guardian examined how Kickstarter became a power in publishing.


Paste profiled singer-songwriter Tedo Stone.


Electric Literature interviewed Teddy Wayne about his new novel Loner.

The Rumpus reviewed the book.


Salon interviewed Wilco guitarist Nels Cline.


The Rumpus interviewed author Paula Whyman.


Angel Olsen discussed her new album My Woman with All Things Considered.


Book Riot recommended fall's best new books.


The A.V. Club shared a playlist of teen-tragedy songs.


0s & 1s Reads interviewed author Hannah Pittard.


The Record profiled singer-songwriter Lucy Dacus.


Alexandra Kleeman and Teddy Wayne discussed their new books at Salon.


Noisey reconsidered the Donnie Darko soundtrack.


Tangerine Dream covered two songs from the Stranger Things soundtrack.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

September 13, 2016

Book Notes - Michelle Tea "Black Wave"

Black Wave

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Michelle Tea's brilliant novel Black Wave blurs the line between memoir and fiction in this poignant work of metafiction.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"Gliding deftly through issues of addiction and recovery, erasure and assimilation, environmental devastation and mass delusion about our own pernicious tendencies, this is a genre- and reality-bending story of quiet triumph for the perennial screw-up and unabashed outsider. A biting, sagacious, and delightfully dark metaliterary novel about finding your way in a world on fire.."


In her own words, here is Michelle Tea's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Black Wave:


Black Wave is a mash-up between memoir and speculative fiction. Written in the third person, it follows Michelle (uh, me), a downwardly spiraling lez living in San Francisco at the end of the nineties, the start of the city's first tech bubble. She pulls a geographic to Los Angeles (‘Geographic' is sober-speak for trying to outrun your addictions) and learns that the world, in an advanced state of environmental collapse from the book's start, has been slated for total destruction. At the same time, the reader learns that the lover Michelle convinced to take her to Los Angeles is but a stand-in for a boyfriend who forbid Michelle to write about him. We're actually in a book. Things get weirder as everyone begins dreaming of the lovers they'd have if the world were to not explode, then finding said lovers on Craig's List. Throughout it all I take off on tangents about addiction, queerness, memoir, ambition, betrayal, class, family, writing and tangents. Hear are the songs that would occupy this world.



The Lords of the New Church, "Apocalypso"
Nobody listens to The Lords of the New Church enough. They're the best garage-punk-goth band the eighties spit up, and Apocalypso is a great showcase for ratty Stiv Bator's (resting in punk in some wild heaven, I hope) nasal whines and barky growls. No time to laugh cause it's all funny, honey / Never thought it would ever happen to me / Video plays it back simulcast / Watchin' the world plunge back to the past. Michelle sitting on the floor of her dingy Hollywood studio apartment watching the first suicidal response to the pending apocalypse on her black and white teevee.

Sonic Youth "Kotton Krown"
When the world begins to end in earnest, people begin to dream of the people they'd have loved if they'd lived, psychedelic astral adventures. Kotton Krown basically triggers the feeling of falling deep in love in my body when I listen to it – it has some direct connection to certain precious brain chemicals. It feels like a wish coming true /Feels like an angel dreaming of you. This song is so perfect, for these scenes and just in general.

Cocorosie "Beautiful Boyz"
Michelle romanticizes criminals, her own potential criminality, the criminal potential of those she loves, the existence of Jean Genet, whose beloved opinions of thieves she nostalgically quotes. Oh, how he loved – he loves prison / How awfully he loved prison. Michelle laments – or simply wonders about – how her criminal friends would have fared had they not been born into low-class, queer existence. All those beautiful boys / Pimps and queens and criminal queers.

The Cramps "Drug Train"
The Cramps make drugs sound like so much fun. Michelle really likes drugs. First they're fun. Then they're not not fun. Then they're not fun. But look, she's doing them anyways. That's how it goes.

Pulp, "Common People"
The Mission District, where Michelle lives in San Francisco, is getting overrun with the upper classes, the gentry, the moneyed folk lured to the city to make scrilla in tech, and lured to the Mission by it's promise of edgy nightlife. These cockroaches come to slum but wind up making the neighborhood as cleaned-up and moneyed as they are. Smoke some fags and play some pool, pretend you never went to school. / But still you'll never get it right / ‘cos when you're laid in bed at night watching roaches climb the wall / If you call your dad he could stop it all. This is on the jukebox when the lez bar gets invaded by drunk yuppies, as well as when Michelle is killing cockroaches with her bare hands in Los Angeles.

Prince "1999"
I was dreaming when I wrote this / Forgive me if it goes astray. Seriously, I should have that disclaimer at the start of every book I've ever written. But especially this one. Prince knew the world ended in 1999, too! The sky was all purple / There were people runnin' everywhere. Pretty much. By the end of the book, Michelle's acceptance could probably be summed up with But life is just a party / And parties weren't meant to last.

Arcade Fire "Black Wave / Bad Vibration"
I stole the name of the book from this song, actually. While going through a brutal breakup and listening to it on repeat while working the weight machines at the Y. The core message of impermanence helped, as it always does when something you want is ripped away from you. This book was meant to be the story of that breakup. Thankfully it turned out a lot weirder. By the way, I don't like the start of this song at all. Just the dark, driving end. Stop now before it's too late / Been eating in the ghetto on a hundred dollar plate / Nothing lasts forever / That's the way it's gotta be / There's a great black wave in the middle of the sea / For me

Missing Persons, "Walking in L.A."
Michelle moves to Los Angeles in 1999. She does not drive. She takes endless buses and keeps her life and routine very small, a two-block radius. Her poverty feel more oppressive in L.A., with the wealth all over the place. Even writers are rich in L.A., so she can't use that as an excuse. When the end of the world is announced she knows she'll die poor and it finally breaks her heart. For all her bravado and class war posturing, being poor is really hard. Dale Bozzio, the original Lady Gaga, new it well: Only a nobody walks in L.A.

The Clash "I'm So Bored with the U.S.A."
Michelle spends the apocalypse in the used bookstore she works at, paring books with albums and then reading while listening to them. She listens to The Clash while reading Peter Plate. Peter writes urban noir, set in San Francisco, in the SROs, in the Mission, kids in gangs, corrupts cops, junkies. It's actually really funny – he has this high-wire sense of urgency and the absurd, and when he gives public readings he performs whole chapters from his books from memory, the Russian Declarative tradition, I believe, which he inherited from radical Russian ancestors. The Clash one-hundred-percent embodies the energy of Peter's writing and performance, life and heart.

Joy Division "Ceremony"
One of Michelle's brief dream loves is a teen punk in a Joy Division shirt when she finds her. Isn't Ceremony the saddest song? Even without the words. It's like innocent doomed longing, a big vibe of the latter half of the book. This is why events unnerve me / They find it all, a different story. Every love Michelle dreams about is a child when she finds them, forever unable to become that person she loved.

Kommunity FK "Something Inside Me Has Died"
I lost my virginity to this song! Which is hilarious. I love this obscure goth-pop band no one remembers. This is for a little two-paged chapter when Michelle realizes that love is an illusion and becomes very sad.

Sisters of Mercy "Black Planet"
I just can't get out of this goth k-hole. The goths do the apocalypse so well, and here the British Andrew Eldritch is improbably spending his radiation and acid-rain-soaked apocalypse in Southern California! And I ride down the highway 101 / By the side of the ocean headed for sunset / For the kingdom com / For the black / Black planet Michelle so would have enjoyed his company while wasting away in her bookstore waiting for her lover Matt Dillon to visit.


Michelle Tea and Black Wave links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Kirkus review
KQED review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Girl at the Bottom of the Sea
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for How To Grow Up
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Mermaid in Chelsea Creek
Psychology Today interview with the author
Switchback interview with the author
VIDA interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes "The Sleeping World"

The Sleeping World

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes's stunning debut novel The Sleeping World brings to life post-Franco Spain through the lives of university students.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Fuentes' ambitious novel does succeed at creating a bleak and disturbing picture of post-Franco Spain."


In her own words, here is Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Sleeping World:


I listen to music when I write, especially when I'm generating, and trying to evoke a certain aesthetic or range of emotions. Often images or lines from my favorite songs will ease their way into my writing or directly inspire a work. I listen obsessively, the same track or album again and again, trying to reach the root of the song, to carve out just how it moves me so. It's a challenge to try to make writing live up to music—probably an impossible one but I don't know what else I can do.

My first novel, The Sleeping World is set in Spain in 1977 in the transitional period between a forty-year dictatorship and an unknown future. Music was an essential part of both research and writing. I listened to the punk, disco, and rock of that time as well as classic flamenco albums (especially Pedro de Linares' Flamenco Carnival and Bebo Valdez and el Cigala's collaboration Légrimas Negras). In The Sleeping World, the characters skirt the edge of the nascent punk movement, going to underground concerts, buying bootleg copies of The Clash and The Ramones, and deriding the disco on the radio. Having missed the cultural and political upheavals of the 1960s, Spain's youth tried to catch up, to abandon with all speed the social mores the fascist regime rested on. They were forced to create a new space in the vacuum, one that both drew from and destroyed their previous culture. As a writer, for me this transitional space was also a space of grieving, between life and death, mourning losses both named and unspoken. Like the narrator, Mosca, I had just lost my brother and writing this book was a way to write through grief, to find life after it.



The National, High Violet, "Runaway"

We don't bleed when we don't fight
Go ahead, go ahead, throw your arms in the air tonight
We don't bleed when we don't fight
Go ahead, go ahead, lose our shirts in the fire tonight

This song is catalyst. I was in a tiny apartment butted up against the Rocky Mountains in Colorado when my partner first played The National's album, High Violet. I love music—don't we all—but unlike every other interest of mine, I'm extremely passive about how I get it. Just about all the music I love has been handed to me by friends, family, ex's with a fervent look in their eyes and a shrug from me. Luckily, they have good taste. I had never heard The National before but we listened to High Violet on loop for months. I probably heard the song "Runaway" twenty times when the story that became the first chapter of The Sleeping World flooded out of it. The story arrived whole cloth—setting, first and final sentence, all woven together with the song's lyrics. I wanted to capture the specific sense of abandon in this song: it's not a wild free-for all, even in its destructive images there is a sense of melancholic nostalgia. Though this album was made long after the events in my novel take place, it was a model in terms of texture and emotional landscape. I love how the lyrics are both specific and obtuse. Matt Berninger's voice is watchful and distanced. I was aiming for the same with my writing, emotional yet controlled, with a river of longing beneath every word.

Patti Smith, Horses, "Gloria: In Exelsis Deo"

Patti Smith is an important figure to Mosca, the narrator of The Sleeping World. Mosca sees her as a punk idol, a woman in a masculine world who is not objectified, someone who has a harsh, difficult-to-define beauty and whose self expression is rough and unpolished. Mosca says she wants to look like her—and she wants to be like her too—but she's not able to be as expressive and emotional as her heroine. Along with explorations of grief, and the legacy of fascism, gender roles and expectations play a large role in the novel. Patti Smith is the anti-thesis of a fascist conception of femininity: gender-bending, irreverent, delving both anger and sweetness.

Silver Convention, "Fly Robin Fly"

One of those so bad it's great disco singles. It gets into your head as easy as a soda jingle and stays stuck. It was a huge hit in Spain in 1977 and Mosca and her friends would have heard it all the time. The contrast between disco and punk at this time is obviously stark and yet there are connections too. The repetitiveness and simplicity as well as the sense that they are both reactions to vapid consumerism and economic depression. Punk music is throwing sucker punches against this reality (or trying to), while the Silver Convention wants everyone to buy polyester jump suits and dance.

La Banda Trapera Del Río, "La Paja de Diego"

I imagined Las Pasotas, the band in the first chapter of The Sleeping World, are emulating La Banda Trapera Del Río but aren't quite good enough. That's why they're all the way out in Casasrojas. La Banda Trapera Del Río was a Catalonian punk band who sung in both Castilian and Catalan, a language that was outlawed under Franco. They formed in 1976, played a concert for the newly legalized Communist Party in 1977, and released their first album in 1978. Poor, marginalized, and furious, they performed in drag and their lyrics are filthy. I love this track especially for the trash talking in the beginning and the moment teasing flamenco, where the lead singer shouts "Salamanca!" with the characteristic vocal wavering.

Kaka de Luxe, "La Tentación"



On the other side of the Spanish punk scene was Kaka de Luxe, glam rockers and children of diplomats rebelling against the entrenched fascism in Madrid. The band's most famous member, Alaska, starred in Pedro Almodóvar's first film Pepi, Luci, Bom as a queer punk singer and went on to become a sex activist and important figure in the counterculture movement La Movida Madrileña. La Movida was barely beginning in 1977 but its art, fashion, and aesthetics heavily influenced The Sleeping World—especially the photographer Alberto García-Alix. I was interested in the tensions between classes that manifested even in underground art—the push and pull between punk rock and glam, between Madrid and more other cities.

Florence and the Machine, Ceremonials, "Never Let Me Go"

And it's peaceful in the deep
Cathedral where you cannot breathe
No need to pray, no need to speak
Now I am under

This woman can sing grief. I listened to so much Florence and the Machine when writing The Sleeping World—her lung-powered catharsis is a perfect example of Federico Garcia Lorca's duende: "a power, not a work . . . a struggle, not a thought." Her music—like Lorca and flamenco—is all about pushing past the limits of acceptable emotion. That's what I love about punk as well. The aesthetics may seem over the top now, at a time when "serious" art is exemplified by restraint, but the political reality that music was made in warrants the gall and excess.

As in both Lungs and Ceremonials, waterways—rivers, oceans, pools—appear throughout The Sleeping World. They are the past moving into the present, the path into the underworld and, maybe, back out again. This is a redemptive song: a descent that is deeply healing. Like Orpheus, Inanna, and Alice Notley's Alette, Mosca must descend into death in order to live. A movement through grief and loss, a drowning that becomes a gift.

A big thanks to Shit-Fi magazine whose article "Drogas, Sexo, y Un Dictador Muerto: 1978 on Vinyl in Spain" introduced me to early Spanish punk music.


Gabrielle Lucille Fuentes and The Sleeping World links:

the author's website

The Capital Times profile of the author
Red and Black profile of the author
Weird Sister interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (The Man Booker Prize Shortlist, The 15th Anniversary of the Drive-By Truckers' Southern Rock Opera Album, and more)

The 2016 Man Booker Prize shortlist has been announced.

Paul Beatty - The Sellout
Deborah Levy - Hot Milk
Graeme Macrae Burnet - His Bloody Project
Ottessa Moshfegh – Eileen
David Szalay - All That Man Is
Madeleine Thien - Do Not Say We Have Nothing


Diffuser reconsidered the Drive-By Truckers album Southern Rock Opera, released 15 years ago this week.


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Flight by Sherman Alexie
The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell
The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy
We're All Damaged by Matthew Norman


eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Elephant's Journey by Jose Saramago
Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin


Literary Hub listed ten novels that use guns as literary symbols.


Rolling Stone on how David Bowie's Scary Monsters album changed pop music.


The New Yorker on the poetry of Tommy Pico.


Ty Segall covered Neil Young's "Down by the River."


Take a classic rock inspired by literature quiz.


Stream a new Ghost song.


The longlist for the National Book Award for Young People’s Fiction has been announced.


Morning Edition interviewed author Kevin Powell about Tupac Shakur's legacy 20 years after his death.


Electric Literature interviewed Alexander Maksik about his new novel Shelter in Place.


The trio Joseph visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


Tin House hosted a discussion between authors Roy Scranton and Nick Flynn.


Billboard listed bad films with great soundtracks.


Rebecca Solnit offered tips on how to be a writer at Literary Hub.


The Fader profiled Roberto Carlos Lange of Helado Negro.


Signature recommended books for female youth activists.


The Quietus reconsidered the Pixies' Trompe Le Monde album 25 years after its release.


Book Riot shared an excerpt from her novel The Wonder.


Stream a new song by Lower Dens.


Here & Now interviewed Nathan Hill about his debut novel The Nix.


Stream a new Kim Gordon song.


The Omaha World-Herald previewed fall's marquee books.


Noisey profiled the band Warpaint.


Hazlitt interviewed author Mary Roach.


Pitchfork shared an excerpt from Jace Clayton's book Uproot: Travels in 21st-Century Music and Digital Culture.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

September 12, 2016

Shorties (Eimear McBride on Writing A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing, R.E.M.'s New Adventures In Hi-Fi Reconsidered, and more)

Eimear McBride explained how she wrote her debut novel A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing at the Guardian.


Stereogum reconsidered R.E.M.'s album New Adventures In Hi-Fi 20 years after its release.


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Flight by Sherman Alexie
The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell
The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy
We're All Damaged by Matthew Norman


eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Elephant's Journey by Jose Saramago
Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin


GQ interviewed author (and private investigator) Patrick Hoffman.


Local Natives visited World Cafe for a live performance and an interview.


Jeffrey Toobin discussed his new Patty Heart biography American Heiress with Hazlitt.


Stream a new Regina Spektor song.


Rivka Galchen talked to the New Yorker about her story in this week's issue.


Stream a new song by the Growlers.


The Rumpus interviewed author Stephanie Danler.


Stream a new Tori Amos song.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Tim Murphy's novel Christodora.


Stream a new song by Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires.


The Atlantic reconsidered the fiction of JT LeRoy.


The Record reconsidered the Ramones' self-titled album 40 years after its release.


Big Issue North interviewed author Jay McInerney.


Flaming Lips whiskey.


The Globe and Mail profiled cartoonist Dash Shaw.


Rolling Stone examined how Bob Dylan made his 2001 album Love and Theft.


Jeanette Winterson, Claire Messud, and others shared writing tips at the Guardian.


Gorilla Vs Bear is streaming the new Still Corners album Dead Blue.


Weekend Edition interviewed Teddy Wayne about his new novel Loner.


PopMatters interviewed Neil Hannon, frontman of the band The Divine Comedy.


Margaret Atwood talked to All Things Considered about her new graphic novel Angel Catbird.


Jason Lytle talked to All Songs Considered about the new Grandaddy album.


Twitter founder Ev Williams discussed his favorite books at the New York Times.


Paste listed the Decemberists' best songs.


Quarterly Conversation interviewed author Daniel Saldaña París.


Joey santiago discussed the forthcoming Pixies album with Drowned in Sound.


Electric Literature interviewed author Mario Bellatin.


The Stranger listed 50 great NW indie rock albums that weren't on Pitchfork's list of the 50 best NW indie rock albums.


The Brooklyn Rail interviewed author Peter Ho Davies.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

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September 11, 2016

Largehearted Boy Weekly Wrap-Up - September 11, 2016

A list of the past week's Largehearted Boy features:


Book Notes: (authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates to their book)

Affinity Konar for her novel Mischling
Alexander Boldizar for his novel The Ugly
Kendra DeColo for her poetry collection My Dinner with Ron Jeremy
Neil Steinberg for his anthology Out of the Wreck I Rise
Peter Ho Davies for his novel The Fortunes


Weekly New Book Recommendations:

Atomic Books Comics Preview (recommended new comics and graphic novels)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


New Music Recommendations:

The Week's Interesting Music Releases


And of course, the daily literature and music news and link posts:

Shorties (news & links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Antiheroines
Atomic Books Comics Preview
Book Notes
Cover Song Collections
Lists
weekly music release lists
musician/author Interviews
Note Books
Soundtracked
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week

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September 10, 2016

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - September 9, 2016

Okkervil River

Allah Las' Calico Review, The Head and the Heart's Signs Of Light, Lucy Dacus's No Burden, Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds' Skeleton Tree, Okkervil River's Away, and Psychic Twin's Strange Diary are all new albums I can strongly recommend this week.

The Beatles Live at the Hollywood Bowl, Prince's Purple Reign in New York, and Jack White Acoustic Recordings 1998-2016 are especially interesting archival releases.

Reissues include a 40th anniversary 4-disc (3-CD, 1-LP box set) remastered and expanded edition of the Ramones self-titled album and a vinyl remastered edition of the Shaggs: Philosophy of the World.

What new music are you looking forward to or enjoying this week?


This week's interesting music releases:

Allah Las: Calico Review
Angelo Badalamenti: Twin Peaks (soundtrack) (remastered) [vinyl]
Bastille: Wild World
Bear Mountain: Badu
Bear vs. Shark: Right Now You're in the Best of Hands / Terrorhawk (reissue) [vinyl]
The Beatles: Live at the Hollywood Bowl
Billy Ray Cyrus: Thin Line
Clipping: Splendor & Misery
The Connells: Stone Cold Yesterday: The Best Of The Connells
Daniel Lanois: Goodbye To Language
The Dear Hunter: Act V: Hymns With the Devil In Confessional
Devin Townsend Project: Transcendence
Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, and Emmylou Harris: Farther Along (reissue) [vinyl]
Faith No More: Album of the Year (remastered and expanded)
Faith No More: King For A Day...Fool For A Lifetime (remastered and expanded)
Gang of Four: Live...In the Moment
Gavin DeGraw: Something Worth Saving
Grouplove: Big Mess
The Head and the Heart: Signs Of Light
Jack White: Jack White Acoustic Recordings 1998-2016
Jason Aldean: They Don't Know
John Williams: Star Wars - Episode IV - A New Hope (gold vinyl) (reissue) [vinyl]
Joshua Redman & Brad Mehldau: Nearness
KT Tunstall: KIN
Local Natives: Sunlit Youth
Lucy Dacus: No Burden
Madlib: Medicine Show: The Brick (13-CD box set)
Madonna: Something To Remember (reissue) [vinyl]
M.I.A.: A.I.M.
New Order: Singles (remastered)
Nick Cave And The Bad Seeds: Skeleton Tree
Norma Jean: Polar Similar
Of Mice and Men: Cold World
Okkervil River: Away
Pansy Division: Quite Contrary
Phantom Planet: Guest (reissue) [vinyl]
Prince: Purple Reign in New York
Psychic Twin: Strange Diary
The Ramona Flowers: Part Time Spies
Ramones: Ramones: 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition (remastered) (3-CD, 1-LP box set)
Robert Pollard: Not in My Airforce (reissue) [vinyl]
Shaggs: Philosophy of the World (remastered) [vinyl]
Snowblink: Returning Current
St. Paul and the Broken Bones: Sea of Noise
Steve Reich: Reich: Drumming (remastered) [vinyl]
Teenage Fanclub: Here
Titus Andronicus: S+@DIUM ROCK: Five Nights at the Opera
The Tyde: Darren 4
Twin Atlantic: GLA
Various Artists: A Rock And Roll Christmas Party
Whitey Morgan and The 78's: Born Raised & Live From Flint (reissue)
Whitey Morgan and The 78's: Whitey Morgan and The 78's (reissue)
Wilco: Schmilco
The Wild Life: Low Tides
Will Butler: Friday Night [vinyl]


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Essential and Interesting 2015 Year-End Music Lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

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September 9, 2016

Book Notes - Neil Steinberg "Out of the Wreck I Rise"

Out of the Wreck I Rise

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Out of the Wreck I Rise is a thoughtfully curated and interestingly composed collection of quotes about recovery from prose, poetry, song lyrics, and film.

Library Journal wrote of the book:

"Chicago Sun-Times columnist Steinberg and book editor Bader have compiled this collection of prose and poetry on the subject of addiction to help those who are still struggling or who are in recovery to find solace in the lives of great people who have also battled the disease. The writings are organized along the lines of an addict's journey—when the good times sour, the importance of time, and the power of embracing a new life. The experiences of well-known figures such as Etta James, Sid Caesar, and John Cheever are relayed in their own words, with feeling and lack of pretense. Anyone affected by addiction will surely identify with the accounts included here, and thus, not feel alone in times of difficulty."


In his own words, here is Neil Steinberg's Book Notes music playlist for the anthology Out of the Wreck I Rise:


Out of the Wreck I Rise is intended to help readers understand what addiction is and how recovery works. Co-author Sara Bader and I weave together excerpts from poems, novels, letters, journals, plays, movies—almost every form of writing from villanelles to a tweet by Ricky Gervais. Lyrics are key, and we include a number of songs for their illumination and power; we would have used more, but songs are very expensive to re-print, and some proved impossible to use because their ownership was so tangled that we couldn't secure the rights. Here are a dozen songs that either are in the book, or speak to what the book is about.



"Liquor Slave" by Lucky Dube

One of the keys in understanding addiction is that it is not a bad choice, but an obsession. You don't destroy your life through substances because you're stupid, but because you're compelled, enslaved, or as the late South African reggae star sings, "a slave, a slave, a liquor slave."

"S.O.B." by Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats

Part tent revival, part 1950s demon rum scare movie, this hand-clapping surprise 2015 hit puts to music the give-it-to-me-now imperative and intensity of addiction, both the shrugging plunge, complete with shaking hands, crawling bugs and breaking hearts at the realization, even through the fog of intoxication: "This can't be me."

"Cold Turkey" by John Lennon

The former Beatle's agonized trek through heroin withdrawal, complete with desperate, groaning screams. "I promise you anything, get me out of this hell." In our book, which creates a mosaic connecting one thought to another to convey a narrative, it leads directly to Christopher Marlowe's: "Why this is hell, nor am I out of it."

"Detox Mansion" by Warren Zevon

In perhaps the most famous song about recovery, "Rehab," Amy Winehouse never gets there, with tragic results in her real life. For all the hard-partying rock stars, there are very few songs about actually going to rehab. "Detox Mansion," is among the best, conveying the weary cynicism mingled with hope that so often greets recovery. "I'm gone to Detox Mansion, way down on Last Breath Farm," sings Zevon, who struggled with alcoholism for decades, and was sober for 17 years before relapsing hard at the end of his life after he was diagnosed with cancer.

"Sober" by Pink

The pop pride of Philadelphia asks what is an essential question in recovery: "how do I feel this good sober?" Addicts must not only stop using, but construct a life they feel good about, where they find the kind of joy they used to find in substances. In the song, Pink sees herself clearly, a party girl running out of time, determined that this is not the way she wants her story to end.

"Some People Change" by Montgomery Gentry

This country duo is known for its smart, contemporary songs, blending faith and courage. "Some People Change" offers something that can be in short supply with the frequent reversals of recovery: hope. It limns the grimness of alcoholism in a few concise lines, the simultaneous submitting and hating that you're submitting, then celebrates those who can re-write the story of their lives: "Here's to the strong. Thanks to the brave. Don't give up hope. Some people change."

"Fallen" by Sarah McLachlan

A song that manages to be despairing and triumphant at the same time. "Better I should know"—in four words, the Lilith-fair founder deflates the regret that those who have "sunk so low." feel at being forced to give up their addictions and confront their broken lives even though "there doesn't seem a way to be redeemed." But there is, for many, as the Canadian balladeer reminds us.

"New South Wales" by Jason Isbell

Sometimes you just get sick of being sick. Isbell takes the details of recovery, the coffee and the posters, the slogans and the meetings, and find them good. Giving up his old life "holds no trace of sorrow," while the program ferrying him to his new life offers salvation. "God bless the busted boat that brings us back."

"Mariner's Song" by Cowboy Junkies

A beautiful song about loss and yearning, with that trademark fluttering mandolin. It might have nothing to do with recovery, but I chose to hear it that way. "I look for you in every crest I ride, with every trough I travel through" conveys the way the thing stays with you. But one line in particular sums up the best reason to keep on the straight path. "The last of man's great untamed beasts"—what could that be?—"lies lapping at my door. And I would be happy to give it what it wants, but I do know it would just ask for more."

That's it. As tempting as going back might be, there's no end to it. The beast would just ask for more.

"Lust for Life" — Iggy Pop

Trainspotting, Danny Boyle's movie about the Edinburgh drug scene might ask "Who needs reasons when you've got heroin?" but if you listen to the song playing over the opening credits, Iggy Pop's bass-drum driven "Lust for Life," you get a quick course in the pleasure of breaking with all those Johnnies and their enticements. "No more beating my brains, with liquor and drugs," Iggy sings, and makes us want to bounce along with him.


Neil Steinberg and Out of the Wreck I Rise links:

the editor's blog
the editor's Wikipedia entry
excerpts from the book

Foreword Reviews review
New York Times review

WGN Radio interview with the editor


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists
Word Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Atomic Books Comics Preview - September 9, 2016

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics, graphic novels, and books.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. He also runs the Mutant Funnies Tumblr.

Atomic Books has been named one of BuzzFeed's Great American Bookstores, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Angel Catbird Volume 1

Angel Catbird Volume 1
by Margaret Atwood / Johnnie Christmas

Acclaimed novelist Margaret Atwood tries her hand at comics and comes up with a scientist who is mutated by an accident into a cross between an owl and a cat in this pulpy and cat-pun-laden superhero adventure.


Diary of a Tokyo Teen: A Japanese-American Girl Travels to the Land of Trendy Fashion, High-Tech Toilets and Maid Cafes

Diary of a Tokyo Teen: A Japanese-American Girl Travels to the Land of Trendy Fashion, High-Tech Toilets and Maid Cafes
by Christine Mari Inzer

A young woman returns to Japan, where she was born and lived the early years of her life, on a journey to rediscover her roots and documents all the fashion, food, and interesting characters she encounters in visual diary form.


FLASHed: Sudden Stories In Comics And Prose

FLASHed: Sudden Stories In Comics And Prose
edited by Josh Neufeld / Sari Wilson

FLASHed is an anthology at the intersection of flash fiction and comics featuring work by Aimee Bender Junot Díaz, Steve Almond, Sheila Heti, Lynda Barry, Gabrielle Bell, Dean Haspiel, John Porcellino and more.


Humanoids Presents The Jodoverse

Humanoids Presents The Jodoverse
by Alejandro Jodorowsky / Moebius / Various

So remember that documentary, Jodorowsky's Dune, about that messiah of a movie the maverick auteur was going to make but instead the whole thing fell apart? He took a lot of those ideas and turned them into comics. But figuring out where to start in the Jodoverse can be a bit overwhelming, but this budget-priced sampler gives you the chance to check things out and figure out where you want to start.


Yuge!: 30 Years of Doonesbury on Trump

Yuge!: 30 Years of Doonesbury on Trump
by G. B. Trudeau

Hey, let's all laugh at Donald Trump. Enjoy it before President Trump makes this book illegal.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Mutant Funnies


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2015" Book Lists

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (Alan Moore Profiled, Will Sheff on the New Okkervil River Album, and more)

The New Yorker profiled author Alan Moore.

Moore talked books and reading with the New York Times.


Will Sheff talked to Paste and CLRVYNT about the new Okkervil River album, Away.


Ebooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Flight by Sherman Alexie
The Kindly Ones by Jonathan Littell
The Prince of Tides by Pat Conroy
We're All Damaged by Matthew Norman


eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Elephant's Journey by Jose Saramago
Notes of a Native Son by James Baldwin


Publishing Perspectives interviewed author Álvaro Enrigue.


Warpaint drummer Stella Mozgawa discussed her favorite albums at The Quietus.


Book Riot recommended graphic novels to read during this election season.


M.I.A. talked about her new album AIM with Morning Edition.


The Rumpus interviewed poet Connie Wanek.


Rolling Stone previewed fall's must-hear albums.


Bookworm interviewed poet Adam Fitzgerald.


The Oklahoman interviewed singer-songwriter Jason Isbell.


Author Mitchell S. Jackson talked to Willamette Week about growing up in Portland.


The Portland Mercury listed 50 great NW indie rock albums that weren't on Pitchfork's list of the 50 Best NW indie rock albums.


The Other People podcast interviewed author Garth Risk Hallberg.


Rolling Stone profiled Against Me!'s Laura Jane Grace.


Read an excerpt from Alexandra Kleeman's short story collection Intimations.


Stream a new Beach Slang song.


VICE interviewed author Mark Greif about his new essay collection Against Everything.


Stream Local Natives' cover of Beyonce's All Night."


Paste interviewed cartoonist Steffen Kverneland.


Paste listed the 50 best new wave albums.


All Things Considered interviewed Ann Patchett about her new novel Commonwealth.

"What I've realized is that all of my books have been the same book," she says. "I write a book that is about a group of people who are pulled out of one family or situation and dropped into another one in which they are not familiar, and then I see how communities are formed. It's Lord of the Flies. It's The Magic Mountain, it's The Poseidon Adventure. As I realize as I've gotten older that I keep doing this again and again — I thought wouldn't it be easy and interesting to leave off all of the costuming and the location that I brought to books like Bel Canto and State of Wonder and just write about two families merging in the suburbs."


Fresh Air interviewed guitarist Nels Cline.


Warren Ellis and Colleen Dorran are collaborating on a webcomic.



also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

September 8, 2016

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - September 8, 2016

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Angel Catbird

Angel Catbird
by Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood wrote a superhero comic book! It's called Angel Catbird and it's about a genetic engineer whose DNA gets merged with a cat and an owl, which makes him unique among the story’s, uh, other cat people. Humorous, pulp-inspired action ensues, with lots of cat puns.


Nicolas

Nicolas
by Pascal Girard

Girard’s Nicolas is a work that revisits the death of his little brother and the larger effects of this loss on his current behaviours and habits. This new edition of Nicolas is complete with a brand new introduction and a new story of his relationship with his surviving brother, Joel. Nicolas is a delicate, minimalist portrait of the many faces of mourning, identified with surprising humour and pathos.


Against Everything

Against Everything
by Mark Greif

Mark Greif, one of the founding editors of acclaimed literary magazine n+1, has a new collection of essays. Entitled Against Everything, Greif addresses contemporary topics like the tyranny of exercise, food snobbery, the crisis of policing, the impact of the Occupy movement, and the demise of the hipster, with a contrarian intelligence that has earned him comparisons to figures as diverse as Susan Sontag and Henry David Thoreau.


Oh She Glows Every Day

Oh She Glows Every Day
by Angela Liddon

The Oh She Glows Every Day cookbook is the hotly anticipated follow-up to the New York Times bestseller Oh She Glows cookbook. Her new title features more than one hundred easy-to-make whole-foods and plant-based recipes to keep you glowing every day of the year.


To Be Or Not to Be

To Be Or Not to Be
by Ryan North

Ryan North (celebrated for his work on the deadpan Dinosaur Comics, as well as Marvel's Squirrel Girl and Adventure Time comics), has followed up his first choose-your-own-adventure adaptation of Romeo and Juliet incredibly fast. To Be or Not to Be, his second Shakespearean romp for young readers, comes only months after the release of its predecessor, with illustrations from dozens of comics luminaries.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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