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November 17, 2014

Daily Downloads (Stars, An Asthmatic Kitty Sampler, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

The 14ers: Get Some EP [mp3]

AM Static: Roots Between the Stones album [mp3]

The Harmaleighs: "Sunflowers" [mp3]

Heman Sheman: "I Could Be Your Answer" [mp3]

Junior Year: Behind the Saloon EP [mp3]

The Outdoor Type: "Are You Happy" [mp3]

Robinson: Fits and Starts EP [mp3]

The Tomes: Great Expectations EP [mp3]

Various Artists: Asthmatic Kitty Digital Sampler, Autumn 2014 album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Stars: 2014-10-14, Brooklyn [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us





November 16, 2014

Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists Updates - November 16th

For the seventh straight year, I am aggregating every online "best of 2014" book list I find.

Please feel free to leave a comment or e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online media list I have missed.

Daily updates to this list.

Revisit previous years' lists from 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2000-2009 (best of the decade) online year-end book list collections.

Today's updates to the master list of online "best of 2014" book lists:

Barnes and Noble (bestselling books)
Books for Her (best books)
Guardian First Book Award (debut books)
Irish Times (Irish authors' and celebrities' favorite books)
Kansas State Library (books by Kansas authors or about Kansas)
Ottawa Book Awards (books by Ottawa authors)
PopSugar (best books for women)
Readings (books for kids and teens)
Readings (books for your parents)
Readings (books for your significant other)
The Royal Society Young People’s Book Prize (best books that communicate science to young people)
Social Media Marketing Blog (top link building books)
Toronto Public Library (top books for kids under five)
Waterstones (best books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
daily updates to the master list of online 2014 year-end book lists

Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics and graphic novel picks)
Anitiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Largehearted WORD (weekly new book picks)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Largehearted Boy Weekly Wrap-Up - November 16, 2014

A list of the past week's Largehearted Boy features:


Book Notes: (authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates to their book)

Brock Clarke for his novel The Happiest People in the World
Elizabeth Kadetsky for her short story collection The Poison That Purifies You
Forrest Gander for his novel The Trace
Jac Jemc for her short story collection A Different Bed Every Time
James Tadd Adcox for his novel Does Not Love
Naja Marie Aidt for her short story collection Baboon


Lists

Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
Daily updates to the online "best books of 2014" lists


Weekly New Book Recommendations:

Atomic Books Comics Preview (recommended new comics and graphic novels)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)


New Music Recommendations:

The Week's Interesting Music Releases


And of course, the daily music and news posts:

Daily Downloads (10 free and legal mp3 downloads every day, plus links to free live recordings online)
Shorties (news & links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)


also at Largehearted Boy:

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines
Atomic Books Comics Preview
Book Notes
Contests / Giveaways
Cover Song Collections
Daily Downloads
Lists
weekly music release lists
musician/author Interviews
Note Books
Soundtracked
Try It Before You Buy It
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

November 15, 2014

Daily Downloads (The Week's Best Free and Legal Music Including Kaki King, Emily Wolfe, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Bahamas: Live at The Current EP [mp3]

Ben Thomas: The Recovery album [mp3]

The Dollyrots: "Happy Together (Turtles cover)" [mp3]

Emily Wolfe: "Missionary Son" [mp3] from Roulette

Kaki King: Everybody Loves You album [mp3]

Liz Vice: There's a Light album [mp3]

Nathan Roberts and the New Birds: Nathan Roberts and the New Birds album [mp3]

Two Ton Folk: Folk 350 EP [mp3]

Various Artists: Secret Road: As Heard on TV: Volume III album [mp3]

Various Artists: Keep Safe Boston 2014 For Planned Parenthood album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Lucero: 2014-11-04, New York [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

November 14, 2014

Book Notes - Naja Marie Aidt "Baboon"

Baboon

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

The Los Angeles Review of Books called Naja Marie Aidt's Baboon a "violent, beautiful, breathlessly paced collection," and I wholeheartedly agree, this is one of the year's strongest short story collections.

Sarah Gerard wrote of the book:

"Naja Marie Aidt's stories ask not only what could be hiding beneath the surface of our otherwise calm lives, but what has been hiding there all along. They are odd and surprising, and refreshing in that they offer no conclusions. She is the writer of dark secrets."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Naja Marie Aidt's Book Notes music playlist for her short story collection Baboon:


I so wish I could write while listening to music, but except for just one exception I can't . . . Baboon might be a very intense collection, but its characters are more driven by a physical, bodily awareness than by emotions (no classic psychological realism here!) so I really enjoyed listening to "emotional" music during breaks from working on these short stories.

When Denise Newman translated Baboon into English we worked very closely together, and I remember how uplifting it was to see that I did not lose focus if I listened to music while working on Denise's drafts. It's the writing itself that demands silence.

I used to work in the music business when I was in my twenties, just before I began writing full-time, and music still means a lot to me. It's a huge inspiration for my work. Growing up in a small village in Greenland in the '60s, I remember listening to The Beatles, The Stones, Bob Dylan, music from the big world that was so far away and seemed so completely unreal to us in our icy, snowy, little world. When I was around 5 years old, my sister and I would get the singles when my parents got the albums sent from Copenhagen and we would turn up the volume in our room and sing along in a self-made "English." I still know every riff from Dylan's "Nashville Skyline" and "Self-portrait" by heart, and it's was only a couple of years ago that I figured out what the real lyrics for "All the Tired Horses" are!

Playlist for Baboon:

James Blake: "The Wilhelm Scream"

I love James Blake's music because it reminds me of poetry. It has to do with the way he works with patterns. I have published ten collections of poetry, and what always drags me back to poetry after writing fiction is the math of the lauguage, the music, the way the composition works. I find the process of writing poetry to be completely different, in the sense of thinking, sensing, and working with the language. In "The Wilhelm Scream" Blake operates with great simplicity, but is able to create different variation of patterns in both the music and the lyrics. I think the song has something deeply human to it: compassion, but also a brutal way of describing confusion or crisis, subjects that Baboon definitely contains. But as Blake expresses confusion, my characters have a hard time realizing what's really going on with them. Many of them are caught in some sort of mental numbness.

Red Hot Chili Peppers: "Road Trippin'"

I was a huge Peppers fan while still living in Denmark and went to see them when they toured Europe in 2006. After moving to the States in 2008, I would travel the country with my family and we would always listen to RHCP in the car. Three kids in the back seat and a blast of music while the landscape flew by. "Let's go get lost/Anywhere in the U.S.A." We felt a great freedom and excitement. "Road Trippin'" especially reminds me of that. Driving from Los Angeles to San Francisco at Christmas time, for example. The song has this incredible softness to it, but it's also so adventurous. In "Mosquito Bite," the very last story of Baboon, a man gets sick and almost dies. When he's in the hospital, all he wants to do is listen to the RHCP, and the music seems to make him gain enough power to finally bring him back to life. There's so much energy in the RHCP's music , it always makes me want to dance, run, jump, or just scream in joy!

Portishead: "Glory Box"

I love this song. It's like a diamond shining in the darkness. Beth Gibbon's voice is amazingly powerful and expressive, raw and tender at the same time. I like the way the lyrics describe the exhaustion of being a woman tied up in the heterosexual game. It's telling an important story about gender. In Baboon the question of gender is something I tend to write about a lot. In the story "Wounds," a character tells a story about falling in love with an Englishwoman at a hotel in the Middle East. But is the protagonist a man or woman? And does it matter? Writing the book, I wanted to explore what gender means on many different levels. In the story "Honeymoon," a couple visits a Greek village that is run as a matriarchy and bad things starts to happen to both of them. There is suddenly a weird shift in the balance of power between them, and it has to do with a savage who suddenly appears from out of nowhere, reciting Blake into the womans ear . . .

Johann Sebastian Bach: "St Matthew's Passion"

For some reason this is the only music I can actually write to. I've done that for ages, including while working on Baboon. Maybe it's because Bach's music is so mathematical. It kind of eases one's mind, listening to his use of structures that somehow feel very emotional, but are bounded in pure math. I like that idea. Some famous french poet (Baudelaire?) once said that literature is made from words, not emotions. I always tell my students that when I teach. It's the language itself that creates the tension, the passion, the intensity, not the artist's urge to drown his or her audience in feelings. Bach had this amazing talent of being able to create music that was incredibly beautiful and moving, simply by being so good at structures, patterns, logical thinking, and math. His music leaves me space to think and write and sometimes it even feels like the St. Matthews Passion sharpens my mind! If I had to pick just one piece of music (going to live on a desert island . . . ) it would probably be this one.

Archie Shepp: "Blasé"

This jazz tune by Shepp from 1969, performed by Jeanne Lee and a wonderful band, is just so awesome and disturbing. It's provocative, dark, and mysterious. The lyrics go:  "Blasé . . . Ain't you Daddy? / You shot your sperm into me, / And never set me free. / This ain't a hate thing… / It's a love thing / If lovers ever really love that way / The way they / Say. / I gave you a loaf of sugar, / You tilt my wound 'til it runs."

What more can I say? This song is definitely about black feminism. There's so much pain and pride in it. Just listen to the drum track. Wow. I feel like it expresses what's going on in Baboon, too. A dark undercurrent that runs through every story in the book. Life is such a sweet and difficult thing, and we are so vulnerable. So much can go wrong so quickly. The drums in Blasé remind me of that. It's like a thunderstorm rumbling in the distance, and then all of a sudden it's a mighty force right over your head. Scary and powerful, but also wonderful.


Naja Marie Aidt and Baboon links:

the author's Wikipedia entry
the book's page at the publisher

Bookslut review
Los Angeles Review of Books review
Music & Literature review
Publishers Weekly review

Asymptote review
Exhibitionist interview with the author
Los Angeles Times interview with the author
World Literature Today interview with the book's translator


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

List of Online "Best of 2014" Book Lists

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Elizabeth Kadetsky "The Poison that Purifies You"

The Poison that Purifies You

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Elizabeth Kadetsky's collection The Poison that Purifies You features captivating stories set around the world that masterfully build apprehension.

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify and the author's website.


In her own words, here is Elizabeth Kadetsky's Book Notes music playlist for her short story collection The Poison that Purifies You:


I wrote and honed the stories in The Poison that Purifies You in the aftermath of a random, violent assault that took place in Manhattan one night in 2005. During that time, I often composed fiction in my head while I walked the city attached to my headset. The more driving the pitch of the music, the more its rhythms matched my stuttered, lacey heartbeat. There was something about the way it answered my mood that made me feel in synch, that put me back together.

I was diagnosed with PTSD. My assault triggered thoughts of earlier traumas I'd experienced: living in downtown Manhattan during the September 11 crisis; covering the wars in central America and Mexico as a journalist in the 1990s; surviving the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake in California while living in close radius to its epicenter. These traumatic spikes became the reference points for the story collection: a story based on reporting I'd done in Guatemala about a suspicious murder/suicide; a story set in the aftermath of an earthquake and fire in downtown Manhattan, which actually used notes from my journals about lower Manhattan during the days following September 11. All told, the story collection came to include two earthquakes; a stress induced skin disorder; a returning female Iraq vet suffering from PTSD after an assault by a fellow soldier; a political kidnapping by Kashmiri nationalists that stops short of a beheading.

Each story has its own song, and each song, in turn, its moments of high anxiety followed by calm euphoria. Explosion, release, calm: that was the mix for the collection.


1. "The Wind," PJ Harvey, 1997 (to be played alongside "An Incident at the Plaza")

In "An Incident at the Plaza." Maria wants… needs… a baby, and puts her body through countless penances before taking more extreme measures. She's an unreliable third person. She lives entirely inside the logic of her experience, a claustrophobic complex of obsessions and desires. PJ Harvey's St. Catherine, the holy anorexic, is a whispery, haunting presence in this song. Oh Mother, can't we give / A husband to our Catherine? Its instrumentation has the relentless cyclic drive of the hip-hop–inspired electronica of that musical moment. The listener becomes caught inside St. Catherine's ominous-sounding compulsions. It's a song about mood; the listener can't break free from it.


2. "Four Strong Winds," Ian & Sylvia, 1964 (to be played alongside "Loup Garou")

In "Loup Garou," Cecile and her soon-to-be ex are visited by a pack of bobcats. Because Cecile is Canadian and has Native American ancestry, she sees the bobcats as a presentiment, though of what she's not sure. This song by the Canadian folk duo is rich with Native American imagery: "Four strong winds that that blow lonely / seven seas that run high." With its beautiful harmonies in classic fifths and sweet melody, it seems at first to be a love song, but its narrator is ambivalent toward his lover and ultimately cruel. He asks her to accompany him on his journey to Alberta—I wish you'd change your mind / If I asked you one more time—but then in a dismissive manner not unlike that of Cecile's antagonist, Morey, the narrator points out that the woman in the song probably wouldn't like it. "Loup Garou" is the anti–"Four Strong Winds." What would have happened if the love interest had taken up the speaker on his offer and followed him. Cecile makes the foolhardy decision to accompany her boyfriend on his journey; not surprisingly, bad things transpire.


3. "Fountain and Fairfax," The Afghan Whigs, 1993 (to be played alongside "Men More than Mortal")

A whirring grunge guitar track, slightly nauseating, propels the listener into a feeling of thrill and recklessness, as if she has flung herself inside a mosh pit. The song's narrator is hooked on booze and heroin; he gets himself clean, then gets hooked on an unrequited love. This is the song for "Men More than Mortal"'s narrator Allison, who has just been dumped by her husband. She bicycles through Manhattan at high speeds without a helmet while simultaneously imagining herself with a former lover in India with whom she took a high-stakes motorcycle journey. Allison crashes her bike, gets trapped inside her bicycle chain, submits to a high-temperature torch flame to get herself released. She stops eating. There is a heady euphoria to her despair. Like that humming guitar track, there is motion and momentum to her narrative. She gives in completely to her mania; it is its own kind of drug.


4. "The Lioness," Songs: Ohia, 2000 (to be played alongside "The Poison that Purifies You")

Jason Molina's heartbreak ode echoes Jack's selfless and self-destructive love: Whether you save me / whether you savage me. Jack is ensnared in a political kidnapping after being lured by a love interest, Rohit—a Muslim impersonating a high caste Hindu. The song's Egyptian lioness, described in a whining, implacable vocal track, evokes the stalking quality of Rohit's suiting of Jack and Jack's ultimate betrayal by Rohit. Finally Jack reconciles that, ultimately, Rohit will murder him. Want my heart to break / If it must break / In your jaws / Want you to lick my blood / Off your paws.


5."Dear God," Monsters of Folk, 2009 (to be played alongside "Il Negro")

"Il Negro," treats the classic problem of religion versus spirituality. One of its three protagonists, Milo, sees Krishna in a racist toy bank from turn-of-the-century America. Its other two protagonists see the toy bank as, respectively, an opportunity for financial advancement and the pure unadulterated spirit—Brahman. The story is set in India, destination for so many god-seeking Westerners who came before. In the "My Sweet Lord" tradition, Jim James's Monsters of Folk takes up the essential question Does god exist? Dear god / I wish that I could touch you. This kind of religious and spiritual questioning seems to me to ultimately arise from the collision of Eastern and Western conceptions of the numinous.


6. "Aïcha," Cheb Khaled, 1996 (to be played alongside "The Indian Friend")

This guttural love song by the Rai legend Khaled, with lyrics in French and Algerian Arabic derrija, portrays a man admiring a queen-of-Sheba like woman from afar and offering her pearls and jewels in exchange for her love. She scorns him, saying she is a queen and not so easily bought. You could say it's a post-colonial gloss on Western imperialism. Aïcha, the Ethiopian queen with her pearls and gems, represents the riches of the East. The lover sees her value as primarily material, but her essential spirit is so much grander than that. "The Indian Friend" treats the theme of imperialism and the interface of East and West in the context of an impossible power dynamic. Set in India, it shows the Indian Rajesh in an encounter with Western yoga students who are either aggressive or passive aggressive as they tumble over themselves trying to balance respectfulness with their ultimate scorn, mistrust, condescension, and misguided good intentions. The Westerners find themselves in an impossible bind, inheritors of a colonial contract not so easily broken by yoga philosophies or the grand task of showing up as witnesses to misery and economic disparity. In the ebony and ivory countries, promises Aïcha's admirer, I will erase your tears, your sorrows.


7. "Cherokee," Cat Power, 2012 (to be played alongside "It Was Only Clay")
 
In the Mesoamerican highlands of Guatemala, Joseph, a would-be archaeologist from New York City, ineffectually tries to interpret Maya cosmology and aphorisms. In broken Indian–Spanish, his host warns him: Cuando temblor, los animals, ahogarse—when the earth shakes, the animals, to suffocate. Then the host points to the sky while impersonating, mystifyingly, either an airplane or a bird. Bury me / marry me to the sky, sings Cat Power. These could almost be Joseph's words. "Cherokee" uses a meditative and ethereal rhythm to create a trance-like state in the listener. Its hypnotic quality reminds me of the way Joseph loses his grip on reality. He has quit his meds for bipolar disorder while also navigating chaos and ruin in the aftermath of the cataclysmic 1976 Guatemala earthquake. Ultimately, as he tries to read signs that there are forces more dangerous at play than Maya curses and natural disaster, he is completely unable to sift reality from a paranoid, delusional mind frame. It is hinted that he will die. "Bury me upside down," I think of Cat Power's words, when I contemplate poor Joseph's inescapable predicament.

 
8. "Because the Night," Patti Smith Group, 1978 (to be played alongside "Dermagraphia")
 
Love is an angel disguised as lust: Naomi is confused about her desires, and so is her body—it erupts in histamine skin lesions so fine they can spell out words. Her attachment to her ex of seven years makes no sense to her. They share a mutual lust, reminiscing on the telephone about their former exploits, each compelled irrationally to seek out the other to work out their irreconcilable past. But Hank is married—gone forever to Naomi. Her world is populated by figments from the past and angels and ghosts—emotions and desires given palpable form. Patti Smith's howl-of-love anthem is about the inability to make our desires literal. Under cover of night we indulge them. The language of love is inarticulate and unrefined. Without you I cannot live / Forgive, the yearning burning / I believe it's time, too real to feel.

 
9. "Days of Fire," Nitin Sawhney, 2008 (to be played alongside "What We Saw")
 
Natalie's story takes place in the aftermath of a fire in downtown Manhattan, but the fire was in my mind a stand-in for the completely unrooted sensory experience of living in downtown Manhattan after the September 11 attacks. Nitin Sawhney's hip-hop DJ track uses repetition, a present-tense narration, and a railroad train-like repetition of words and syllables to create an ominous, numbed, and traumatized experience for the listener: Now it's all gone slow motion / everything slow motion / The lights gone out / I feel no more emotion / I'm all out of emotion / I'm out of emotion. Sawhney's story of walking outside to discover the aftermath of the coordinated suicide bombings in London in July 2005 gets it for me, what it's like to wander dazed-faced in the rubble after a collective emergency on the scale of September 11.

 
10. "Tom Traubert's Blues," Tom Waits, 1976 (to be played alongside "Geography")

Tom Waits's ballad calls to mind an injured World War II returnee; it is for me a war-trauma narrative, with its maudlin repetitive stanzas and European evocations. "Geography" portrays a modern-day war trauma, that of a female soldier returned from Iraq after a sexual assault by a fellow soldier. In group therapy at the Vet's Center, she meets other PTSD sufferers, including one sad case still unrecovered from Vietnam. Tom Waits growls, I begged you to stab me / you tore my shirt open / And I'm down on my knees tonight / On Bushmill's I staggered / you'd bury the dagger. I see a battlefield; I sense the irrational, non-linear memories of a survivor. A lot they can do for me, Waits's narrator says angrily. I don't want your sympathy. A resentful alcoholic, Tom Traubert is a symbol for how war still lives on in the psyche decades afterwards.

 
11. Bonus Track: "Adagio in G Minor for Organ and Strings," Tomaso Albinoni, circa 1708

Used on countless film tracks, the most searing evocation of this emotional and thrilling faux-Baroque epic occurs in Peter Weir's Gallipoli, about the suicidal Gallipoli campaign in World War I resulting in the deaths of scores of Australian soldiers. The final scene of the film, set to this track, depicts our hero running into battle with arms splayed above. He knowingly catapults his body forward into death. It is the ultimate trauma soundtrack, and one with a curious history. Attributed to the Baroque composer Tomaso Albinoni, it has been the subject of musicological investigations asserting that its real composer, Remo Giazotto, arranged it based on recovered notes of Albinoni's in the twentieth century. These notes were discovered in the ruins of the Saxon State Library in Dresden after the bombings of 1945. It's meta, this piece, a war narrative composed of an earlier war narrative. With its passionate and building violin melodies, it is the theme for the collection.


Elizabeth Kadetsky and The Poison that Purifies You links:

the author's website

Necessary Fiction review

Making Sense of Alzheimer's profile of the author
Vol. 1 Brooklyn profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

List of Online "Best of 2014" Book Lists

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - November 14, 2014

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Showa 1944-1953

Showa 1944-1953
by Shigeru Mizuki

This third installment of MIzuki's sweeping epic chronicles the end of the Pacific War, and the devastation endured by both Mizuki himself and Japan more broadly. With his signature masterful style, Mizuki, one of Japan's most famous cartoonists, recounts moments as world-changing as the atomic bombs dropped by the United States, and as intimate as his own loss of an arm.


Wendy

Wendy
by Walter Scott

Wendy is a urban twenty-something whose "dreams of contemporary art stardom are perpetually derailed," and if that doesn't pique your interest, Scott's brash, spaghetti-limbed illustration sure will. Hailed both as the Cathy of the hipster art world (by Bullett) and the "real voice of our generation (sorry Lena Dunham)" by Vice, this party girl's antics will endear her to you from the very first panel.


Art Schooled

Art Schooled
by Jamie Coe

Continuing on with the art school theme, Coe, a UK-based illustrator, brings us a funny, vibrant account of what it's like to go from small town to big city. Lushly coloured, and with a cast of characters to match, the comic's protagonist, Daniel Stope, struggles to make friends, find love, and sort out his life, in the process giving us a heartwarming coming of age story.


The David Foster Wallace Reader

The David Foster Wallace Reader

It's difficult to describe a writer as acclaimed and prolific as David Foster Wallace, and nearly impossible to point to which of his works constitute essential reading. But the impossible has been done, in this carefully curated collection of his fiction, non-fiction, and teaching materials. This collection, an in-depth, substantial tome, was put together by an entire team of writers and critics, and is an excellent resource for newcomers and long-time admirers alike.


No Such Thing

No Such Thing
by Ella Bailey

Georgia the littlest skeptic keeps noticing strange things happening around her house. A lesser mind would think it was ghosts, but not Georgia. She knows better. Bailey's first children's book, No Such Thing, is a beautifully illustrated story for 5-7 year-olds that will keep you guessing until the very end.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

List of Online "Best of 2014" Book Lists

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (Matt Bell on Videogames, The Worst TV Biopics About Musicians, and more)

Boss Fight Books interviewed author Matt Bell about video games.


Flavorwire listed the worst made-for-TV biopics about musicians.


30 online "best books of 2014" lists were added to the master aggregation at Largehearted Boy Saturday, including many from Booklist, NBC News's to science and tech books, and much more.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author Julia Elliott.

The Rumpus reviewed Elliott's new story collection The Wilds.


Paste interviewed musician and author John Darnielle.


PEN interviewed author Atticus Lish.


The Record profiled the band TV on the Radio.


The Paris Review interviewed Dick Cavett.


FACT listed the best 100 tracks of the decade so far.


The Rumpus interviewed author Damien Ober.


Drowned in Sound interviewed the musical duo April Towers.


Bookworm interviewed author Ben Lerner.


VICE listed the worst Beatles songs.


The London Yodeller the interviewed cartoonist Seth.


Are you listening to Serial? Stream and/or buy Nick Thornburn's soundtrack for the series.


Author Nuruddin Farah talked books with the New York Times.


Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+, and Stumbleupon for links (updated throughout the day) that don't make the daily "Shorties" posts.


also at Largehearted Boy:

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best of 2014" Book Lists

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
daily mp3 downloads
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)

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Daily Downloads (Ben Thomas, Amanda X, and more)

Every day, Daily Downloads offers 10 free and legal mp3 downloads.


Today's free and legal mp3 downloads:

Ben Thomas: The Recovery album [mp3]

Blackfoot Daisy: Sweet Release single [mp3]

Deer and Girl: Wither single [mp3]

Honora: "Tearing Us Apart" [mp3]

Mermaidens: O EP [mp3]

The New Twenty Two: Acoustic EP [mp3]

Prehistoric Man: "Forest Fun" [mp3]

Two Ton Folk: Folk 350 EP [mp3]

The Wordman of Alcatraz: Photosynthesis album [mp3]


Free and legal live performances at other websites:

Amanda X: 2014-10-23, New York [mp3]


search for more free and legal music downloads at Largehearted Boy


also at Largehearted Boy:

other daily free and legal mp3 downloads
covers collections
100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads

Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, books, and pop culture news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtrack)
weekly new album lists

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November 13, 2014

Book Notes - Jac Jemc "A Different Bed Every Time"

A Different Bed Every Time

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Kevin Brockmeier, George Pelecanos, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Poignant and unsettling, the stories in Jac Jemc's collection A Different Bed Every Time burrow into your subconscious and linger long after you finish them.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Jemc's stories are, on the whole, somber, her characters dispirited and constrained by a world unable to understand them. It is the prose—in the playful and poetic approach to language and form—that gives these stories light."

Stream a playlist of these songs at Spotify.


In her own words, here is Jac Jemc's Book Notes music playlist for her short story collection A Different Bed Every Time:


Patty Griffin "Mother of God" - "The Grifted"
The first line of this story is pulled directly from this song (I'll probably be arrested now for stealing). It's a very simple sentence, but it struck me when I'd hear it: "It's Saturday at the mansion." The tone of the song doesn't quite match with what the bulk of "The Grifted" ended up being. The story moves a bit more wrecklessly, but it comes back to the sorrow of the song at the end - the loss and quiet desperation, the need for an answer.

Nat Baldwin "Weights" - "The Dark Spot"
Nat Baldwin is a master of unsettled, assonant melancholy that makes a perfect match here. That sawing bass has a feeling of suspense, the vocals are a little unmoored, popping up and settling back in. The narrator of the story needs a break from all the ragged activity of her family, and I think this song somehow accomplishes both that frenetic energy and the respite from it.

Fiona Apple "Parting Gift" - "Ratman"
I found this song after writing the story, but there's a moment of the story where the narrator opens her eyes while she and her partner are having sex to smile at him, but his eyes are squeezed shut and he looks sort of pathetic with effort. It's different than what Apple talks about in this song, but there's an overlap that makes sense to me, the point being that in both cases things are off balance in when and to what people are supposed to be paying attention. And then the line about all the signs telling them to stop, but they "went on wholehearted. It ended bad, but I loved where we started:" that seems like a perfect explanation of every failed relationship.

The Nerves "Hanging on the Telephone" - "Somebody Else's"
I imagine the narrator going out and dancing to this when she's in her prime time, to celebrate having filmed the TV show, before she becomes deeply depressed. And then there's the thematic overlap of waiting for a call, waiting for something to happen, trying to force action that might be out of your control.

Yo La Tengo "Stockholm Syndrome" - "Unaccounted"
Pochard in this story is convinced the relationship is salvagable, until he's forced to admit it was a total disaster. This song sounds so poppy and tender on the surface, but if you listen it's quite sinister. "No, don't warn me, I know it's wrong, but I swear it won't take long. And I know you know, It makes me sigh; I do believe in love." I think that's Pochard's MO, too. He knows he's in a mess of a situation but warning him won't make a difference. He needs to figure it out on his own.

Cat Power "Sweedeedee" - "A Heaven Gone"
I call the format of this story "the road," and I think of this as a rambler of a song, so the impulses match up. Both are a little dirty, a little down on their luck, looking to run away from their troubles.

Townes Van Zandt "Be Here to Love Me Today" - "Before We Pass This Way Again"
The song is mentioned in this story. It's the father and daughter's anthem. I don't think it needs much more explanation.

Tim Kinsella sings the songs of Marvin Tate by Leroy Bach "Idolize" - "More Mysteries"
This is one of the most messed up songs I know, but I love the exuberance and rawness. It gets at the heart of something that I've always been aware of as problematic, but also bears logic: You can idolize a total fuck-up. And in idolizing that fuck-up, you might realize that you're the one that doesn't have your shit together.

Radiohead "Black Star" - "The Tackiness of Souls"
This song gets matched because I probably listened to it several hundred times the year I wrote this story. Obsession. "I get on the train and I just stand about now that I don't think of you. I keep falling over I keep passing out when I see a face like you." It's so destructive to give yourself over to that kind of love, but sometimes you have to give it a shot: to test it, to know, to feel alive.

Joni Mitchell "Case of You" - "Recipe for Her Absence"
I don't know that it's that every story in this collection is about loss and confusion and sadness and needing to make your own mistakes, or if it's just with the ones that are that I can easily pair songs. Dialogue from an argument in a song? Only Joni can pull it off so well, "‘I am as constant as a northern star.' And I said, "Constantly in the darkness? Where's that at? If you want me I'll be in the bar.'" I imagine this discussion having happened before this couple broke up.

YACHT "Psychic City" - "The Things Which Blind Us"
The lackluster joy. The vaguely hallucinatory way of looking at the world. The amped up way of feeling emotions when you don't have any options.

Dixie Cups "Iko Iko"- "Let Me Be Your Tugboat King"
The rhythm of this song, like jumping rope, like playground rhymes, like call and response, like a spell, like a hymn. The story falls somewhere between this and a square dance for me.

Chopin Mazurkas Op. 6 - "The Hush of the Party"
Quiet but danceable, these songs are what I hear in my head beneath the din of voices in this story, fading to silence as the guests start their bows and curtsies.


Jac Jemc and A Different Bed Every Time links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Chicago Reader review
Foreword Reviews review
Heavy Feather Review review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review
The Rumpus review
Shelf Awareness review

The Austin Review interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes essay by the author for My Only Wife
Monkeybicycle interview with the author
The Nervous Breakdown self-interview by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Book Notes (2012 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

List of Online "Best of 2014" Book Lists

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
Daily Downloads (free and legal daily mp3 downloads)
guest book reviews
Largehearted Word (weekly new book highlights)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Atomic Books Comics Preview - November 13, 2014

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics and graphic novels.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. The Mobtown Shank is his blog, and his comic Said What? is syndicated weekly in the Baltimore Sun's B-Paper.

Atomic Books has been named one of Bizarre Magazine's 51 geekiest places on the planet, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


Arsene Schrauwen

Arsene Schrauwen
by O. Schrauwen

O. Schrauwen's first graphic novel in English is a masterwork - blending reality and surreality. The artist's grandfather travels to an island colony utopia in the twentieth century. Beautifully simple linework, a clever story, and beautiful printing on the part of Fantagraphics.


Hawd Tales #1

Hawd Tales #1
by Devin Flynn

Ripped from the pages of Vice! Well, not actually ripped, but this comic did start out as a strip there - but now it's a grown up comic book - a crazy, urban, underground tale of cops, crime, weirdness and lunacy. Totally fun!


The Kitchen #1

The Kitchen #1
by Ollie Masters / Ming Doyle

If you love 1970s, gritty, New York City crime stories, this new Vertigo mini-series is what you're looking for. When an Irish gang gets tossed in prison, it's up to their wives to keep running their rackets and keep the cash flowing. Masters delivers what looks, thus far, to be a feminist take on the genre, and Ming Doyle delivers her signature stylized art that feels both retro-cinematic and freshly modern at the same time.


Wicked & Divine Vol. 1

Wicked & Divine Vol. 1
by Kieron Gillen / Jamie McKelvie

This trade collects the first story arc from Image's hit series, Wicked & Divine. In this series, a group of gods show back up nearly every century. They hang out of a couple years and then disappear. They have returned again. This time, they're pop stars.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Said What?


also at Largehearted Boy:

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

List of Online "Best of 2014" Book Lists

52 Books, 52 Weeks
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists Updates - November 13th

For the seventh straight year, I am aggregating every online "best of 2014" book list I find.

Please feel free to leave a comment or e-mail me with a blog, magazine, newspaper, or other online media list I have missed.

Daily updates to this list.

Revisit previous years' lists from 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2000-2009 (best of the decade) online year-end book list collections.

Today's updates to the master list of online "best of 2014" book lists:

The Adonis Zone (top crime books)
Booklist (top arts books)
Booklist (top arts books for youth)
Booklist (top biographies)
Booklist (top black history books for youth)
Booklist (top black history nonfiction)
Booklist (top books on sustainability for youth)
Booklist (top business books)
Booklist (top crime fiction audiobooks)
Booklist (top crime fiction for youth books)
Booklist (top first novels)
Booklist (top first novels for youth)
Booklist (top food books)
Booklist (top graphic novels)
Booklist (top graphic novels for youth)
Booklist (top historical fiction)
Booklist (top literary travel books)
Booklist (top nonfiction books)
Booklist (top religion and spirituality books)
Booklist (top religion and spirituality books for youth)
Booklist (top romance fiction)
Booklist (top science fiction, fantasy, and horror books)
Booklist (top science fiction, fantasy, and horror books for youth)
Booklist (top sports audiobooks)
Booklist (top sports books for youth)
Booklist (top women's fiction)
BuzzFeed (best book-to-film adaptations)
Greatist (must-read fitness, health, and happiness books)
NBC News (top science and tech books)
New Zealand Listener (best books)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Online "Best Books of 2014" Lists
daily updates to the master list of online 2014 year-end book lists

Online "Best Books of 2013" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2012" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2011" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2010" Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Book Lists
Online "Best Books of 2009" Lists
Online "Best Books of 2008" Lists

2013 Online Year-end Music Lists
2012 Online Year-end Music Lists
2011 Online Year-end Music Lists
2010 Online Year-end Music Lists
Best of the Decade (2000-2009) Online Music Lists
2009 Online Year-end Music Lists
2008 Online Year-end Music Lists
2007 Online Year-end Music Lists
2006 Online Year-end Music Lists
other lists at Largehearted Boy

Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics and graphic novel picks)
Anitiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Largehearted WORD (weekly new book picks)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)

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