June 7, 2017

Book Notes - Jordan Harper "She Rides Shotgun"

She Rides Shotgun

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jordan Harper's novel She Rides Shotgun is a compelling, dark, and intriguing debut.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"From its bravura prologue to its immensely satisfying ending, this first novel comes out with guns blazing and shoots the chambers dry. It's both a dark, original take on the chase novel and a strangely touching portrait of a father-daughter relationship framed in barbed wire."


In his own words, here is Jordan Harper's Book Notes music playlist for his debut novel She Rides Shotgun:



My first novel She Rides Shotgun is Paper Moon with a body count, a road novel in which shy eleven-year-old Polly and her recently sprung father Nate drive through Southern California while trying to escape a death sentence placed on them by a white power prison gang. Along with Polly’s teddy bear, who she manipulates like a puppet to express her hidden nature, the two of them take a journey that leads them from the cities to the high desert, and brings them together in ways both beautiful and twisted.

"Gone to Earth" by American Analog Set

When fresh-from-jail Nate comes to take Polly from in front of her school, she is shy, with her hair hanging in her face to hide from the world. She thinks of herself as a girl from Venus, her way of thinking about her inability to fit into the world around her. This low-key, lovely song about escaping on rocket ships is a perfect way to set the table, a quiet moment before the lid gets ripped off …

"Rumors of War" by High on Fire

Like most people, I have a Spotify playlist called "Music to Punch To." It’s mostly full of angry music that reveals my age: Rollins Band, Ministry, Godflesh. But the one band mostly heavily represented in my violent playlist is heavy metal band High on Fire. No band could be better for the scenes in which Nate teaches Polly to channel her anger into her fists. And of all of their songs, “Rumors of War” rocks the hardest. The way lead guitarist/vocalist/real-life-doof-warrior Matt Pike snarls “ooh, shotgun” midway through the song shoves more grit into two seconds than I’ve crammed into my whole career.

"Bad and Bougie" by Migos

The third member of the family is Polly’s nameless teddy bear, who expresses things that Polly herself cannot, as well as being the friendless girl’s only friend. Polly has learned to manipulate the bear like a puppet, and the bear loves to dance. As Nate and Polly grow closer during their journey, they learn that they both love big booming hip-hop, and they dance together. So why not dance along to the hit of the year, “Bad and Boujee” by trap superstars Migos?

"Living in Darkness" by Agent Orange

Southern California surf punk at it’s finest, “Living in Darkness” fits the soundtrack of the section of the novel when Nate and Polly prowl the sands of Huntington Beach searching for Nazi skinheads, looking for a way in to attack the gang. There’s a lot more to be written about surf-punks, that great confluence of mohawks and sex wax, and some day I intend to do so.

"You Dropped a Bomb on Me" by The Gap Band

The only song mentioned by name in the book is “You Dropped a Bomb on Me” by The Gap Band, which strung-out meth tester Scubby sings after snorting a particularly strong line of Nazi dope. Scubby, as good-natured a gak-fiend as you will ever meet who finds himself in the middle of a dope heist, is probably my favorite minor character in the book, and the fact that when jolted with crank his brain burps out Gap Band lyrics is one of the reasons why.

"The Satanic Rites of Drugla" by Electric Wizard

I mentioned Electric Wizard in my last playlist, but I’m mentioning them again for two reasons: one, they fucking rule, and two, when the skinheads come for a character named Charlotte, she’s happily getting high while wearing an Electric Wizard t-shirt. I figure Charlotte, with her taste for danger, would dig a song like “The Satanic Rites of Drugula,” which is about a vampire who ties up women, plies them with drugs and then battens to them so Druglua can get high off their dope-laced blood. I told you the band rules.

"Open the Light" by Boards of Canada

The gorgeous, psychedelic electronica of Boards of Canada is the best writing music in the world, which is why of my 25 top most-played songs on iTunes, nine of them are from the Scottish duo. Open the Light is my all-time most-played song, a beautiful and haunting song with richly textured keyboards, somehow calling forth memories from childhood, which is why I listened to it more than usual while writing a novel from Polly’s POV. I thank Boards of Canada at the end of the novel. I highly recommend you check them out.


Jordan Harper and She Rides Shotgun links:

Kirkus Reviews review
LitReactor review
New York Journal of Books review
Publishers Weekly review

Booklist Reader post by the author
Criminal Element interview with the author
Writers' Bone interview with the author

Largehearted Boy playlist by the author for Love and Other Wounds


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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June 7, 2017

Shorties (Collaborations Between Writers and Punk Bands, Erin Osmon on Her Jason Molina Biography, and more)

Tobias Carroll examined collaborations between writers and punk bands at Hazlitt.


Erin Osmon talked to Aquarium Drunkard about her new book, Jason Molina: Riding With the Ghost.


The Quietus interviewed musician JD Samson.


The Drunken Odyssey podcast interviewed author Sarah Gerard.


Stereogum listed its favorite albums of 2017 so far.


The Nervous Breakdown features an excerpt from Julia Fierro's new novel The Gypsy Moth Summer.


Stream a new song by the band Twin Peaks.


BookPage interviewed author Sherman Alexie.


World Cafe shared its favorite songs of the year so far.


Publishers Weekly interviewed Rafe Bartholomew about his memoir Two and Two.


Stream a new Alvvays song.


Booklist interviewed author Thrity Umrigar.


Stream a new song by the Front Bottoms.


Bookforum interviewed author Sunaura Taylor.


Stereogum interviewed Kassie Carlson of the band Guerilla Toss.


Amelia Gray on reading Isadora Duncan's autobiography.


Stream a new Death From Above song.


Eugene Lim discussed classics that inspired his novel Dear Cyborgs.


All Songs Considered interviewed singer-songwriter Torres.


Literary Hub reconsidered Richard Brautigan's novel Trout Fishing in America, first published 50 years ago.


Stream two new Deer Tick songs.


David Means on what he learned from Denis Johnson.


Gorilla Vs. Bear listed its favorite albums and songs of the year so far.


Signature recommended books to understand today's LGBTQ issues.


Stream a new Ariel Pink song.


Literary Hub interviewed author Jessie Chaffee.


Cyndi Lauper is adapting the film Working Girl into a stage musical.


Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is being adapted into a graphic novel.


Stream a new Zola Jesus song.


View the drafts of Allen Ginsberg's poem "Howl."


The Week shared a brief history of space music.


Kristen Radtke talked to Art Beat about her graphic memoir Imagine Wanting Only This.


Stream an 11-hour "evolution of punk" playlist.


The Chicago Review of Books recommended summer reading.


The Colorado Springs Independent profiled singer-songwriter David Dondero.


The Washington Post recommended June's best science fiction and fantasy books.


Stream new Nine Inch Nails music.


The Rumpus interviewed author David Sedaris.


The Cut profiled Shirley Manson of Garbage.


Julia Fierro discussed point of view at Writer Unboxed.


Stream a new Bjork song.


eBooks on sale for $0.99 today:

A Father's Law by Richard Wright
The Interrogative Mood by Padgett Powell

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Across the Bridge by Mavis Gallant
Blind Ambition by John W. Dean
Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay
The Drowning Season by Alice Hoffman
Finks by Joel Whitney
Gone to Soldiers by Marge Piercy
The Hippest Trip in America by Nelson George
History by Elsa Morante
Insurrections of the Mind by Franklin Foer
The Humans by Matt Haig
Living Like a Runaway by Lita Ford
The Los Angeles Diaries by James Brown
The Memory Place by Mira Bartok
Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto
My Cross To Bear by Gregg Allman
Not My Father's Son by Alan Cumming
An Object of Beauty by Steve Martin
Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck
Post Office by Charles Bukowski
She Got Up Off the Couch by Haven Kimmel
A Widow's Story by Joyce Carole Oates

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful: Three James Herriot Classics
The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
Back to Blood by Thomas Wolfe
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Frog Music by Emma Donohue
The Group, The Company She Keeps, and Birds of America: Three Novels in One Collection by Mary McCarthy
Jackie Under My Skin by Wane Koestenbaum
Land's End by Michael Cunningham

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

And the Band Played on by Randy Shilts
Black Deutschland by Darryl Pinckney
Dry by Augusten Burroughs
A Home at the End of the World by Michael Cunningham



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

June 6, 2017

Book Notes - Jill Eisenstadt "Swell"

Swell

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jill Eisenstadt's novel Swell is moving, dark, and funny.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"In this touching portrait of ordinary people grappling with the aftershocks of 9/11—memorials, uncertainty, death, and a new life—the emotional upheaval of a national tragedy leaves no one unaffected."


In her own words, here is Jill Eisenstadt's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Swell:


Swell is a novel about yearning to feel safe. To that end, Sue has moved from post-9/11 Manhattan to Rockaway Beach, NY. She's converting to Judaism, living with her nasty father-in-law and parsing every word exchanged with her teenage daughter. But only music gives her a true sense of security. The bulk of the book is set in 2002, not long after the first iPod appeared. Sue is immediately attached to the device. Before that (and like me,) I imagine she went through dozens of Walkmen and before that a cassette player with jacks for earphones and before that, well… she just lay on her bedroom floor staring at album covers while listening to the corresponding records. Back in the day, Sue's fictional band, Visitation had a regular gig at the real and popular Tribeca club, Wetlands. Now she's quit her job as a middle school music teacher with plans to write an opera. By the book's end she has written only half of one aria. But there's hope.


1.) "Graceful Ghost Rag" by William Bolcom

Once you listen to "Ghost Rag" a few times, you can hear it in your head at will and when writing Swell, I often did. To my mind, it has the perfect echoey good-times-gone mood to evoke a big, crumbling rumored-to-be haunted house on the sea. I've loved the piece from the snowy morning at Bennington College when I walked into my music tutorial to find my teacher, Lou Calabro playing it with his eyes closed. Afterwards, we analyzed Bolcom's score. Of the notation — ("Don't drag") — Lou wagged his cigar and said, "A ghost that drags would be a drag. But a ghost in drag…?"

2.) "I Need A Girl (Part 1)" by Sean Combs

As research, I re-listened to all the pop songs from 2002, choosing this mega-hit to be playing on the radio at a beach party. The book, like the song has marriage as one of it's subjects. "First we were friends then become lovers/You was more than my girl, we was like brothers" also reminds me of the romance between Tim and Sue, two characters who were childhood friends in my first novel, From Rockaway. In Swell we see them again, approaching middle age and just now, falling in love.

3.) "Oh, What A Dream" by Johnny Cash

Four year old daughter, Sage comforts Sue, saying, "Don't worry mommy, it's just a dream," a line spoken by one of my own kids at the same age. Though it's hard to use dreams in fiction, writing is often like dreaming as our unconscious minds connect seemingly disparate things. The song was in the original draft of the book but to be honest, I was too cheap to pay for the permissions. I picked it in honor of the spooky moment, a few days after 9/11 when I first heard (or listened to) the lyrics:

I dreamed I walked in a field of flowers
Oh, what a dream
The houses all were silver towers
Oh, what a dream…


4.) "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" by Charles Warfield/ Clarence Williams

Since Sue was a child (trying to drown out the sound of her fighting parents) she's sung to herself as a way to cope, escape, remain or communicate calm. "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" was the song she used to soothe baby June but now that her daughter's a teen, the blues tune quells her own anxieties. I wanted to show the way a melody can travel like a yawn. Only half-hearing her mother, June, (tripping on a morning glory/gin concoction) picks up the song and sings it too. In the book, I reference the original 1923 Bessie Smith version but there are dozens of great recordings by everyone from Leon Redbone to Billie Holiday to Django Reinhardt. Since I only listen to instrumental music while writing, I actually prefer the rendition by Miles Davis.

5.) "Going Home" (taken from Dvorak's 9th symphony in E minor) is often played on the bagpipes as a dirge for fallen firefighters. Tim hears it in his head at random moments, traumatized as he is from the dozens of funerals he attended after 9/11. I've read (but not verified) that Dvorak was inspired by both black spirituals and native American Indian music.

6.) "What is and What Should Never Be" by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant

The first concert I ever went to was Led Zeppelin (1977 North American Tour). I was fourteen and literally up in the last row of Madison Square Garden but I don't think I sat down once. "What is and What Should Never Be" wasn't on that night's play list but it made it on to pregnant Sue's iPod. "It went perfectly with the hot, gray day and the baby's heavy-metal kick."

7.) "If You Don't Know Me By Now" by Simply Red (Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes)

As in the novel, I came across an old bible while bagging things for Goodwill. The book had been given to my brother at his bar-mitzvah and then used as scrap paper to scrawl the P.O box and address to send away for Golden Hits of the Seventies. Immediately, I recalled the whole eight-track. "If You Don't Know Me By Now" wasn't even on my favorites. That would have been 8.) Stories' "Brother Louie (especially titillating in segregated 1970's Rockaway) or 9.) Glady Knight and the Pips, "Midnight Train to Georgia". But listening to all those songs again, it was Harold Melvin's croon which called up long forgotten images: My friend's red platform shoes with the tiny door (we later realized, for stashing drugs). The miniature varnished bagels we wore on leather cords around our necks (WTF?). In the manuscript, I kept adding the word "forever" at the end of the lyric: If you don't know me by know you will never never never know me …forever) and my editor kept removing it. On the third or fourth pass he finally queried: "You know there is no `forever,' right?"

10.) "Intermezzo" from Cavalleria rusticana (1889 Pietro Mascagni)

Opera figures in Swell in a variety of ways. Along with Sue's ambition to write one, it's the lens through which she sees the house:

"…An opera of a house is how Sue regards the heavy, dark, Old World mustiness. Fat, ornate furniture legs plot to trip you; worn velvet cushions sigh out clouds of melodramatic dust; drafty old windows turn ordinary sea breezes into hysterical arias." pg. 35

Cavalleria rusticana is set in Sicily where my character, old Rose has her roots. Intermezzo means intermission. In the opera, the orchestra plays the tune to an empty town square.

My intense fear of being heavy handed in my work sometimes backfires, leading me to squash emotion and drama. Purposely conceiving of a novel as operatic freed me to try on big subjects - murder and séances, ghosts, grief, religion, improbable love.

11.) "Get the Party Started" by Pink

In case this list is getting too highbrow, here's Pink with the song that was never not playing in the spring/summer of 2002. In the book, the characters in the driver's ed car are singing along to the song on FM radio. The relentless chorus and shallow cheerfulness do a good job of capturing the motion sick feeling of driving around in circles in a vehicle with teenagers. And the video is full of cars too.


Bonus List

All the songs and/or artists mentioned in From Rockaway

"I Want a New Drug" Huey Lewis and the News
Iron Maiden
Quiet Riot
"Flesh for Fantasy" Billy Idol
"Girl, I Want Your Body" The Jackson 5
"Muscles" by Diana Ross
"Surfin' Safari" The Beach Boys
"I'm on Fire" Bruce Springsteen
"What's Love Got to Do With It" Tina Turner
"Lets Get Physical"
"I Honestly Love You" Olivia Newton John
"Dare to be Stupid" Weird Al Yankovic
"Rockaway Beach" The Ramones
"Miss Me Blind" Boy George
"If I Said You Had a Beautiful Body Would Your Hold It Against Me" Bellamy Brothers
"When Irish Eyes are Smiling" Bing Crosby
"Yankee Doody Dandy"
"New York, New York" Frank Sinatra
Elvis Costello
Sex Pistols
Dead Kennedys
Fleshtones
"Glamorous Life" Sheila E
"Cruel Summer" Bananarama
"Nowhere Man" Beatles


Jill Eisenstadt and Swell links:

the author's website

Kirkus Reviews review
New York Times review
Newsday review
Publishers Weekly review

Literary Bennington interview


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Alan Drew "Shadow Man"

Shadow Man

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Alan Drew's novel Shadow Man is a compelling literary thriller.

Kirkus Reviews wrote of the book:

"An unusually deft blending of styles, Drew's engrossing novel works equally well as psychological study and cop thriller, literary novel and genre piece."


In his own words, here is Alan Drew's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Shadow Man:



I cannot write without music—or at least I've convinced myself that I can't. Maybe that's a glass-half-empty way of looking at things. Let's be positive: music provides a sort of emotional spark that helps me imagine scenes. This is most successfully done in my car, unfortunately, where, alone and unable to embarrass (or frighten) my wife and kids, I listen to the kind of depressing, heavily minor-keyed music that induces me to imagine scenes in which I say exactly what I wish I'd said to someone I knew years ago. I'm the guy you watch in your peripheral vision at a stoplight who seems to be arguing with himself. This used to be a problem, but thanks to Bluetooth technology I now appear to be normal. But this trick of imagination is more difficult to achieve at my desk. Without the movement of the car, the music I write to has to have a propulsive force—though a quiet one. No thumping beats or thrashing guitars, no polite symphonic works or modernist jazz, no lyrics of course—but a sense of movement and tension. For this book, I needed music that would help me conjure Southern California while living in Philadelphia. Not only that, I needed music that would transport me back to a Southern California that is mostly gone now, that of south Orange County in the 1980s. That OC still held a tinge of the old west in its orange groves and strawberry fields, in its cowboys running cattle in the hills—though that world was quickly being bulldozed into oblivion.

"Dungeoneering," Tim Hecker
I kept Tim Hecker on a constant loop while writing this book, switching between albums when the feeling struck. Since Shadow Man is a sort of thriller with three different investigations intertwining, I wanted the book to carry a sustained tension, and much of Hecker's work, with its electronic distortion, its propulsive base lines, and its looping, subtle melodies captures musically want I wanted on the page. For this column, I'm throwing out "Dungeoneering" as the representative sample of Hecker's music, but I could have selected ten other songs. With Hecker, it's not about individual songs; it's about the whole work. You listen to a Tim Hecker album as you would a symphony. The album's form--its rising tensions and mini-climaxes, its musical codas and moments of melodic clarity--has a sort of narrative quality to it. His work is dense, urban, full of sharp edges and white noise, but there's a real beauty in it, too, a beating heart with melodies breaking through the din like moments of emotional truth. That's what I hoped to capture with this novel. So, if I pulled it off, I have Tim Hecker to thank for giving me the soundtrack.

"Guitar Solo #5," Neil Young
Detective Benjamin Wade, my protagonist, is the son of one of the last cowboys in Orange County. He has a few of his own horses, and in his off time goes riding the hills with his daughter. Growing up in Irvine, CA, I remember cowboys herding cattle in the open hills. That land is mostly gone now, clogged with faux Mediterranean McMansions or sliced with toll roads. Shadow Man, in part, is a eulogy for that lost California. When I wanted to capture that old west feel, I queued up "Guitar Solo #5," which Neil Young wrote for the soundtrack to Jim Jarmusch's film, Deadman. The east coast can feel claustrophobic to me, too many trees, too much green. The west—at least in my mind—is all about open spaces, about sweeping vistas. Young's guitar, with the reverberating feedback and echoing space between notes, captures that feel for me. When I listen to it, I can see the Irvine of the early 1980s, when cattle dotted the hillsides and orange groves spread to the foothills of the Santa Ana Mountains.

"Richard Ramirez Died Today of Natural Causes," Sun Kil Moon
The killer in Shadow Man is loosely based on Richard Ramirez, aka The Night Stalker. In the summer of 1985, Ramirez terrorized Southern California--driving the freeways, turning into suburban neighborhoods, climbing through open windows, and killing people in their own homes. If you were in SoCal at the time, you remember this summer as a time of fear. As Mark Kozelek sings, "And everybody remembers the paranoia/ When he stalked the suburbs of Southern California/And everybody will remember where they were/When they finally caught the Night Stalker." I was sixteen that summer, and I remember one night my father came home from work and wedged broomsticks into the frames of the sliding glass doors. It was a hot summer, hovering in the 80s at night. We didn't have air conditioning in my childhood home, but we locked every window and door of that one-story house. I still remember lying in bed at night, sweating from the heat, watching the window above my bed, sure the Night Stalker was going to somehow break in and kill me in my sleep. It was the first time, I think, that I realized my body could be taken from me, the first time I really confronted my own vulnerability. But the song, as with my novel, is about much more than the Night Stalker. It's really about other kinds of terror—the pervasive violence that marks history, the dark secrets in suburban neighborhoods, the fear of growing older and facing your own mortality.

"Gimme Danger," Iggy and The Stooges
I never intended to write a thriller. The serial killer in Shadow Man was supposed to be on the periphery of the book, a fearful metaphorical pressure that would serve the greater concerns of character. Ben has another crime to solve, a subtler one, one born of a long-held secret, and I had focused the narrative there. The killer's point of view was not in the first draft of this book. That came later, when it became clear to me that I couldn't put a serial killer in the novel without the detective hunting after him—something I should have known from the beginning. I struggled, at first, to write from the killer's point of view. After a few days of frustration, I sat out in our sun room one night after my kids were in bed and listened to my iTunes library on shuffle—just to clear my head, to get away from words. "Gimme Danger" came on and the song hit me hard. For some reason, it was exactly the thing I needed to hear at that moment—from the edge in the guitars, to the threat in the lyrics, to the snarl in Iggy's singing. This song gave me the killer's voice, and these four lines became the epigraph for the novel: "Find a little strip, find your little stranger/Yeah you're gonna feel my hand/I got a livin' angel, want a little danger/Honey you're gonna feel my hand." What got left out of the epigraph is the next line: "Swear you're gonna feel my hand." The threat in that promise becomes the killer's calling card in the novel.

"Age of Consent," New Order
Ben Wade has a secret he's kept since he was a teenager. In the course of a murder investigation, Ben has to confront his past, and sections of the novel are written from the point of view of his teenage self. Since I was a teenager in 1985, the year the book is set, I needed to tap into my own teenage awkwardness to access Ben's hormone-addled brain. "Age of Consent," more than any other '80s song I can think of, was the soundtrack to my early teens. Following my parents' divorce, I escaped into music. I had a Sony Walkman, and I kept the cassette tapes of Low Life and Power, Corruption, and Lies on an endless loop—locked in my bedroom to escape my family, skateboarding around town, weekends skiing at Mammoth Mountain. New Order is not the kind of music Ben would like. He's old school—likes '60s and '70s R&B, classic rock. But Emma, Ben's fourteen-year-old daughter, is tuned into KROQ, the Los Angeles alternative radio station (which was truly alternative at the time), and she tortures her father's ears with post-punk and new wave tunes she likes to blast on the hi-fi. "Age of Consent" is a great alternative pop song. Also, the song's title speaks to an important thematic problem in the novel: when are you old enough to give sexual consent to your body?

"Handsome Devil," The Smiths
This Smiths song is not featured in the book. Instead, Emma plays "Reel Around the Fountain" for her father one night while cooking up tacos together. This is exactly the kind of song Ben hates—that whiny Morrissey voice, those precious, melodramatic lyrics. Worse, the sexual references in the song—"Fifteen minutes with you, I wouldn't say no" or "Slap me on the patio, I'll take it now"—cause him heart palpitations; his "little girl" has a new boyfriend, a loser surfer Ben doesn't like. The idea that she might not say "No" if she has fifteen minutes alone with the loser scares the hell out of him. But I'm with Ben on this one, not my favorite song by the Smiths. Instead, I'm going to put Handsome Devil here, which was my favorite song in the world for a couple months when I was sixteen. I knew the song would piss my parents off—the implied homosexuality, the sadomasochistic lyrics—but it really was this line I seized upon: "Let me get my hands on your mammary glands." An anthem for the shy sixteen-year-old boy, indeed!

"Bela Lugosi's Dead," Bauhaus
Emma is working hard to piss off her parents, too. She's angry at them both—they've gotten divorced a year before, her father is over-protective, her mother is already dating. What better song to drive your parents crazy than this gem? Every musically hip kid I knew in high school in the '80s declared loved for Bauhaus and this song in particular. I suspect few of them—including myself—liked this song as much as they said. But it was a marker of cool. It was a way to flip your finger at the conservative hell of master-planned Orange County which thrived on conformity and fear of the outside world. In the novel, it's also a reminder that the killer is out there, lurking in the hills, a menace that loves to prey on such communities.

"Rise Above," Black Flag
For a certain kind of teenager, Orange County is a very isolating, provincial place. You can see that frustration expressed in the early 1980s through the hardcore punk scene, which thrived at the time. There's a young man in the novel, Tucker Preston, a skater kid and college student, who has had a troubled childhood. He's angry at the world and pens the names of punk bands all over his backpack and skateboard—X, Social Distortion, The Adolescents, The Dead Kennedys. In "Rise Above," Henry Rollins yells, "We're tired of your abuse/Try to stop us; it's no use!" It's a good mantra for Tucker, a damaged kid trying to get control of his life.

"The Love Sermon," Al Green
"I want to do everything for you/That ordinary men won't do." This is the sweet spot for Ben. Old school R&B. Ben still pines for his ex-wife, Rachel, but he's on the edge of a relationship with the medical examiner, Natasha Betencourt. But his secret, which has helped to destroy his marriage, is also beginning to compromise his burgeoning relationship with Natasha. When this song makes the scene in the novel, it's unclear who Ben is thinking about. It's also unclear whether Ben can be the kind of man he wants to be; to be so, he has to deal with his troubled past. But more than that, the religiosity in Al Green's music, the idea that this is a "sermon" is important to the book. Ben wants something pure, a love that is untarnished, something that feels "holy."

"Who Are You," Tom Waits
As Ben and Natasha work together to solve what seems to be the murder of a teenage Mexican strawberry picker, Natasha suspects Ben is hiding something. There's a revealing moment in a bar, where Natasha is sure Ben is lying to her. He's not following all leads in the case, she realizes; there are conspicuous connections between Ben's past and the dead boy. Central to the narrative then is Natasha's investigation of Ben, and her discovery of his dark past. In a very real sense, she's trying to discover who Ben is, this man she feels she loves. In that scene in the bar, "Wait's Shore Leave" is playing on the jukebox. But "Who Are You" feels like a theme song for Natasha's questions about Ben. The song was not released until 1992, but the refrain, "And just who are you, who are you this time?" captures the longing, the confusion, and the anger Natasha feels towards this emotionally-opaque man.

"Hatred of Music I," Tim Hecker
When I wrote the violent climactic scene for this book, I listened to this song constantly. The crescendoing dissonance, the off-kilter plinking of the piano suggested to me a final confrontation that ends everything, yet leaves the world unsettled.

"Common Burn," Mazzy Star
An hour before writing this, Pitchfork broke the news that Keith Mitchell, the long-time drummer of Mazzy Star, had died. This lends an air of melancholy to a song that figures in my mind as the lovely point of rest for Ben and Natasha. In a book about troubled intimacy, I wanted a genuine intimate moment, where everything is exposed, not in a fraught painful way, but in a calm accepting manner. This song didn't come out until 2011, but it feels like the kind of track that could form the backdrop to such a moment between them. It's intimate and quiet, yet it's a song troubled by questions about possible infidelity that darken the beautiful calm of the music. Just in real life, after you experience a traumatic event things are never the same. Things might be okay, but they're always tinged by the echo of that experience. Such is true with Ben and Natasha.


Alan Drew and Shadow Man links:

video trailer for the book

Kirkus Reviews review
Publishers Weekly review

The Big Thrill interview with the author
Omnivoracious essay by the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Delia Cabe "Storied Bars of New York"

Storied Bars of New York

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Delia Cabe's Storied Bars of New York is a wonderful resource for fans of literature, New York City, and cocktails. Compellingly written, the book lists the city's famed literary bars and includes a signature cocktail recipe for each.

Cool Hunting wrote of the book:

"Two features take Cabe's book to an even more thoughtful level. Cabe procures the recipe for each bar or tavern's signature drink—helpful for those far from the Big Apple. Further, using quotes from the authors who frequented the venues, as well as magazine excerpts from their time of prominence, Cabe captures the cultural scene of times long since past. This is a book that will appeal to cocktail lovers, literary aficionados, New Yorkers, and anyone looking for a drinking spot with ghosts in its closet."


In her own words, here is Delia Cabe's Book Notes music playlist for her book Storied Bars of New York:



There are so many songs that I listened to and thought of while writing my book. New York City gets a shoutout in great songs. Choosing just a few for my playlist was a delicious challenge. I left out many favorites. Here are a few:


"Empire State of Mind" by Jay-Z & Alicia Keys

This song and the video, a lyrical montage of New York City, capturing the essence of my hometown. While writing Storied Bars of New York, I kept thinking how I would depict what I love about New York City—its ever-changing self while staying true to its history, its neighborhoods, its people. "Empire State of Mind" gets at its grittiness, while Alicia Keys' chorus ups the romance of it all. I listened to this song often during my research to set the mood.

"Every Stop on the F Train" sung by the Young People's Chorus of New York City

The F train, my neighborhood subway throughout my childhood, was the only subway line close to my apartment building on the Lower East Side. By close, I mean, a walk of about a dozen city blocks to the East Broadway station, a rusted, smelly, damp cave. The F train gave me access to the rest of Manhattan and all the adventures it had to offer. The F train was also how I traveled to grade school in Greenwich Village (on the same street as one of the bars in my book) and to high school on West 79th Street (a few blocks from another bar in my book), a journey that required three train lines. Because of my long rides, I read numerous books to while away the time. Absorbed in a book, I'd sometimes miss my home stop, the last one in Manhattan, and end up in Brooklyn. The only reason I'd notice was that the rhythm of the train had changed. The distance between stops lengthened because we were under the East River. If I wanted to, but didn't, I could stay on until the last stop, Coney Island, itself a marvel, with its rides, beach, and the ocean. Instead, I switched to the Manhattan-bound train in Brooklyn. To this day, I associate the F train with my literary journeys—in books and in the blocks of the city itself. This song puts me back on that train.

"I'll Be Seeing You" by Billie Holiday

This sentimental ballad by Irving Kahal and Sammy Fain in 1938 gets me verklempt every time I hear it. Every. Single. Time. The song, popular during World War II, speaks of seeing one's lover in "all the familiar places" while the person's away on the front and asks, "Who knows if we shall meet again?" One evening over gimlets at Bemelmans, a gorgeous bar with murals by the author of "Madeline," the children's books, my sly husband asked the pianist to play this song for me. He knew what would happen. I cried. And when I wrote about the bar's history in my book, I cried again. In my acknowledgments, I thank my husband for his support and end with "I'll be seeing you. Always."

"Life During Wartime" by the Talking Heads

My book features bars, historic and new, that attract a literary crowd. However, I included two that no longer exist: Pfaff's, the birthplace of American Bohemia where Walt Whitman and other writers hung out and quaffed a few drinks, and the San Remo Café, home to the Beats. I would have loved to be a fly on the wall in those two watering holes in their heyday. Every time I hear the line, "This ain't no Mudd Club, or CBGB," I lament that I never got to go to CBGB, located in the East Village, either. I also wish that I could have included it in my book. Alas, the club, which was known for its vibrant, edgy music scene, not for cocktails, is closed. Patti Smith, who had performed there many times, sang there on its last night. I tell her story of coming to Manhattan, hanging at the bar at the Hotel Chelsea, and working at a bookstore in the Chelsea chapter of Storied Bars of New York.

"In the Flesh" by Blondie

A song that name-checks the Lower East Side, my childhood neighborhood, and is by Blondie? Sold. Blondie's music always felt like one of New York City's soundtracks. Perhaps Debbie Harry's days in New York City before the band emerged formed its musical beat. Blondie was also among the denizens of CBGB as well as Max's Kansas City, another hallowed ground for artists, musicians and the literati. The Lower East Side and East Village, which melt into each other at Houston Street, were home to the Beats, other writers, musicians and artists. The Nuyorican Poets Café and the KGB Bar celebrate all things literary here. I loved diving into the area's history and its current scene for my book.

"Rhapsody in Blue" by George Gershwin

This song first debuted in a New York City concert hall in 1924 during the Jazz Age and Prohibition. This jazz piece is rich, sultry, smoky. It also has lush moments, that almost seem celebratory. An article in the New York Tribune inspired Gershwin to compose this piece. Gershwin told a biographer, "I heard it as a sort of musical kaleidoscope of America, of our vast melting pot, of our unduplicated national pep, of our metropolitan madness." "Rhapsody in Blue" played in my head during epic walks in New York City to research this book last summer. I heard "Rhapsody in Blue's" rhythms in the traffic, the throngs on the sidewalk, the rush of the trains, the barges gliding on the river, and the buildings lit at night. No wonder Woody Allen used it in the opening scene of his movie Manhattan.

"The 59th Street Bridge Song" by Simon and Garfunkel

"The city seen from the Queensboro Bridge"—the official name of the 59th Street Bridge until 2010—"is always the city seen for the first time, in its first wild promise of all the mystery and the beauty in the world," F. Scott Fitzgerald writes in The Great Gatsby. The bridge, a metal beast that roars and vibrates as vehicles travel on it, spans the East River, from Manhattan's East Side to Queens, depositing you first into Long Island City. Traveling from Queens, you behold Manhattan's skyline. In the other direction, you are greeted by the landmark Silvercup Bakery (now Silvercup Studios) sign and other factories dating from the 1920s. When the bakery was in operation, the pleasant yeasty smell of bread wafted across the bridge, causing car passengers to roll down their windows to breathe in deeply. Long Island City is home to the century-old LIC Bar, where Catherine LaSota hosts a robust reading series, in the shadow of that bridge. As for the song and its lighthearted, trippy "feeling groovy," Paul Simon thought of the song while crossing the bridge around 6 a.m. one day and feeling the world was just right. (He and Art Garfunkel hail from Queens.) Decades after the song's debut in the mid Sixties, LIC has become a home for artists, writers and others who've taken over the factories, with glassy office and apartment buildings looming over them.

"52nd Street" by Billy Joel

During Prohibition, 52nd Street was lined with numerous speakeasies, including the "21" Club, whose colorful history and regulars from Dorothy Parker to Ernest Hemingway to Julia Child is detailed in my book. The other speakeasies are gone, but 21 remains. Its staying power could be attributed to its owners wish to stay classy, not devolving into a dive. It survived Prohibition by paying the feds and local cops to look the other way. In this song, Billy Joel pays tributes to 52nd Street's other past as a center for jazz and music studios. A Rolling Stone writer reviewing the album 52nd Street notes that it "evokes the carnivalesque neon glare of nighttime Manhattan, using painterly strokes of jazz here and there to terrific effect." I picture listening to this song in a bar on an old jukebox somewhere in the recesses of Manhattan, perhaps Kettle of Fish.

"Shattered" by the Rolling Stones

"Life's just a cocktail party on the street/Big Apple…" Mick Jagger got it, though no native New Yorker would ever call their city the Big Apple. Hearing Jagger talk about the shmatta district aka the Garment District is a kick. (My Puerto Rican grandmother took a job as a seamstress at a lingerie factory to earn a living.) During writing breaks, I played this song loud to re-energize me and dance around my house to get the blood flowing.

"The Schuyler Sisters" from the musical Hamilton

I've not seen Hamilton, but have listened to the album and have seen some of the show's numbers performed on TV. That a successful Broadway play celebrates a part of New York City history is wonderful. I've read books on New York City's history ever since I had a library card at Seward Park Library on the Lower East Side. Yes, I bought the 1400-plus page tome, Gotham: A History of New York City to 1898, dip into it every so often, and wonder when the sequel will come out. "History is happening in Manhattan," the sisters sing, and they're right, even now. Writing my book gave me an excuse to immerse myself in New York City history—as if I even needed an excuse.

"How About You?" by Frank Sinatra

I've always loved this jazz standard, first sung by Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney. Because my book's release date is June 6, I found myself humming this song frequently because of the lines "I like New York in June, how about you?" and "I'm mad about books, can't get my fill." I'm excited about my book events in the city. Seems like a perfect ending to my playlist.


Delia Cabe and Storied Bars of New York links:

the author's website

Cool Hunting review

amNewYork bar crawl inspired by the book
BroadwayWorld interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Recommended Apocalyptic Fiction, The Best Albums of 2017 (So Far), and more)

Tor.com and VICE recommended apocalyptic fiction.


SPIN listed the best albums of 2017 so far.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed Gabe Habash about his debut novel Stephen Florida.

BuzzFeed shared an excerpt from the book.


Stream a new Luna Shadows song.


R.I.P., author Helen Dunmore.


Insider Monkey listed the best music documentaries on Netflix.


Stream a new song by Gambles.


Richard Ford discussed his memoir Between Them with the Guardian Books podcast.


Stream a new Gogol Bordello song.


The New York Times reviewed Arundhati Roy's new novel The Ministry of Utmost Happiness.


Mary Timony talked to WBUR about the Helium reunion.


The Associated Press profiled author Jill Eisenstadt.


Stream a new Jay Electronica song.


Guernica shared an excerpt from Yuri Herrera’s novel Kingdom Cons.


Pitchfork shared a guide to essential live Grateful Dead songs.


Signature examined film adaptations of the works of Daphne du Maurier.


Stream a new Smerz song.


Olivia Sudjic recommended short stories by women at Harper's Bazaar.


Stream a new song by Trouble.


Read an excerpt from Victor LaValle's new novel The Changeling.


Stream a new Waxahatchee song.


The Rumpus interviewed author Amy Benson.


Bob Dylan's Nobel prize lecture.


eBooks on sale for $0.99 today:

A Father's Law by Richard Wright
The Interrogative Mood by Padgett Powell

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Across the Bridge by Mavis Gallant
Blind Ambition by John W. Dean
Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay
The Drowning Season by Alice Hoffman
Finks by Joel Whitney
Gone to Soldiers by Marge Piercy
The Hippest Trip in America by Nelson George
History by Elsa Morante
Insurrections of the Mind by Franklin Foer
The Humans by Matt Haig
Living Like a Runaway by Lita Ford
The Los Angeles Diaries by James Brown
The Memory Place by Mira Bartok
Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto
My Cross To Bear by Gregg Allman
Not My Father's Son by Alan Cumming
An Object of Beauty by Steve Martin
Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck
Post Office by Charles Bukowski
She Got Up Off the Couch by Haven Kimmel
A Widow's Story by Joyce Carole Oates

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful: Three James Herriot Classics
The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
Back to Blood by Thomas Wolfe
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Frog Music by Emma Donohue
The Group, The Company She Keeps, and Birds of America: Three Novels in One Collection by Mary McCarthy
Jackie Under My Skin by Wane Koestenbaum
Land's End by Michael Cunningham

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

And the Band Played on by Randy Shilts
Black Deutschland by Darryl Pinckney
Dry by Augusten Burroughs
A Home at the End of the World by Michael Cunningham



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

June 5, 2017

Shorties (Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman on Their New Anthology, Stream the New Big Thief Album, and more)

Jewish Journal interviewed Ayelet Waldman and Michael Chabon about their anthology Kingdom of Olives and Ash.


NPR Music is streaming Big Thief's new album, Capacity.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed Deepak Unnikrishnan.


Paste profiled the band Beach Fossils.


Alex Ross talked to the New York Times about energizing the Sewanee Review.


WUNC interviewed John Darnielle about the new Mountain Goats album, Goths.


J. Ryan Stradal remembered author Denis Johnson.


Rolling Stone interviewed Elvis Costello.


Kristin Kontrol (Dum Dum Girls) is scoring a Nicolas Cage movie.


Patricia Lockwood discussed her favorite books at The Week.


PopMatters interviewed Saint Etienne's Sarah Cracknell.


Margaret Atwood on birdwatching.


Stream a new Superchunk song.


Jewish Journal interviewed Ayelet Waldman and Michael Chabon about their anthology Kingdom of Olives and Ash.


Pitchfork looked back on the discography of Look Blue Go Purple.


CBC Radio interviewed Ted Goosen about translating the works of Haruki Murakami.


Stream a previously unreleased Chastity Belt song.


Work in Progress featured a conversation between authors Eugene Lim and Donald Breckenridge.


Stream a new Radiohead video.


Barbara Browning on blurbs at Publishers Weekly.


Stream a new Beth Ditto song.


The 2017 International Literary Awards have been awarded.


Tei Shi played a Paste session.


Thrity Umrigar talked to Weekend Edition about his novel Everybody's Son.


Flavorwire shared new songs from the Twin Peaks soundtrack.


Open Letters Monthly interviewed author Paula Bomer.


Paste recommended June's best new music.


Tor.com recommended June's best new genre-bending books.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Japanese Breakfast's Michelle Zauner.


Tin House interviewed author Peter Rock.


eBooks on sale for $0.99 today:

A Father's Law by Richard Wright
The Interrogative Mood by Padgett Powell

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Across the Bridge by Mavis Gallant
Blind Ambition by John W. Dean
Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay
The Drowning Season by Alice Hoffman
Finks by Joel Whitney
Gone to Soldiers by Marge Piercy
The Hippest Trip in America by Nelson George
History by Elsa Morante
Insurrections of the Mind by Franklin Foer
The Humans by Matt Haig
Living Like a Runaway by Lita Ford
The Los Angeles Diaries by James Brown
The Memory Place by Mira Bartok
Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto
My Cross To Bear by Gregg Allman
Not My Father's Son by Alan Cumming
An Object of Beauty by Steve Martin
Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck
Post Office by Charles Bukowski
She Got Up Off the Couch by Haven Kimmel
A Widow's Story by Joyce Carole Oates

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful: Three James Herriot Classics
The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
Back to Blood by Thomas Wolfe
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Frog Music by Emma Donohue
The Group, The Company She Keeps, and Birds of America: Three Novels in One Collection by Mary McCarthy
Jackie Under My Skin by Wane Koestenbaum
Land's End by Michael Cunningham

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

And the Band Played on by Randy Shilts
Black Deutschland by Darryl Pinckney
Dry by Augusten Burroughs
A Home at the End of the World by Michael Cunningham



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

June 2, 2017

Book Notes - Cosey Fanni Tutti "Art Sex Music"

Art Sex Music

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Cosey Fanni Tutti's bold and fascinating memoir Art Sex Music chronicles a life led through art, both performance art and music as a member of Throbbing Gristle, Chris and Cosey (AKA CarterTutti), COUM, and other projects.

Kirkus Reviews wrote of the book:

"Without a hint of regret, Tutti bares all in the name of art and personal integrity. A bravura rock memoir vibrating with fierce and fearless memories―a must-have item for Chris and Cosey and Throbbing Gristle fans."


In her own words, here is Cosey Fanni Tutti's Book Notes music playlist for her memoir Art Sex Music:



As music is my preferred form of self expression, and dominates my life in terms of live performances and studio recordings, I had so many tracks to select from that relate to my autobiography Art Sex Music.

‘Because the Night’ by Patti Smith
I used this track during my stripping days. It was totally different to the usual more popular songs I danced to on stage. When I was booked for a venue with a decent sized dance area I'd have the DJ play this for me to strip to... getting totally lost in the spirit of the song - “because the night belonged to lovers - because the night belonged to lust". Those words said it all for me at that time too, as me and Chris weren't yet free to be together. Our nights, given the opportunity, were all about love and lust - hence our 1984 Chris & Cosey album title, 'Love and Lust'. I got to see Patti and the band perform live at Wembley through my friend Sandy Robertson, who was a journalist for the UK music press and also crazy mad about her.

'Hey Joe' by Jimi Hendrix
1967 was a good year - it was the first time I saw Jimi Hendrix perform and I was blown away by him. It's difficult to explain just how outrageous he was at that time especially to the people in a fishing port in the North of England. But for me he was an inspiration, a vision of another way to be, an introduction to a revolutionary way to play guitar.

'Venus in Furs' by Velvet Underground & Nico
This album and particularly this song is the most evocative of my teenage self, my sexual awakening. No matter how many times I listen to it, it always takes me back to that time and place, to being with my friends, talking about changing the world, the smell of joss sticks and hashish hanging in the air, laying on huge velvet floor cushions, stoned and wrapped in the arms of my lover.

'Alone Again Or' by Love
Perfection in melody, harmony, rhythms, vocals that work so exquisitely and together to create emotional highs of joy and gently evoke the tenderest of feelings. And that trumpet! Sends ripples of pure ecstasy right through me. I never ever get sick of listening to the whole 'Forever changes' album. Maybe it's because it was played so much and provided me solace in my tormented youthful years, echoing my own moments of light and darkness.

'Take It Easy' by Prince Buster & the All Stars
The music for summer days but most memorably from when I was working in a chess factory in Hull. Listening to Prince Buster was so uplifting and really chilled us all out singing along together, taking the edge of being at work.

'Dancing Queen' by ABBA
I know this became a kitsch song but it has a different resonance with me. For one thing the title - I was doing topless dancing and striptease when this was released and played in all the venues I worked in. Chris bought me the 7” single - for (his) 'Dancing Queen' and I carried it with me as a love token although I never danced to it. The upbeat joyous feel of the music always makes me think of Chris and want to dance, yet a little melancholy because of the circumstances of my situation back then.


Cosey Fanni Tutti and Art Sex Music links:

the author's website
the author's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

Guardian review
New Statesman review
Rolling Stone review

Dazed profile of the author
East Anglian Daily Times profile of the author
Guardian profile of the author
Hot Press profile of the author
Jezebel interview with the author
MTV News profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - June 2, 2017

Chastity Belt

Chastity Belt's I Used To Spend So Much Time Alone is my favorite album on this week's release list.

Amber Coffman's City Of No Reply, Bleachers' Gone Now, and Marika Hackman's I’m Not Your Man are other new releases I can recommend.

Vinyl reissues include LPs by Iggy Pop, Asobi Seksu, Tom Petty, and Swans.

What new music are you looking forward to or enjoying this week?


This week's interesting music releases:

Adrenaline Mob: We The People
All Time Low: Last Young Renegade
Alt-J: Relaxer
Amber Coffman: City Of No Reply
Asobi Seksu: Citrus (reissue) [vinyl]
Ayron Jones: Audio Paint Job
Beach Fossils: Somersault
Benjamin Booker: Witness
Bleachers: Gone Now
Bob Marley: Exodus - 40 (remastered and expanded)
Buffalo Tom: Let Me Come Over 25th Anniversary Edition [vinyl]
Charlie Fink: Cover My Tracks
Chastity Belt: I Used To Spend So Much Time Alone
Dan Auerbach: Waiting On A Song
Darren Hayman: Thankful Villages Vol. 2
Depeche Mode: Black Celebration (reissue)
Depeche Mode: Music for the Masses (reissue)
Depeche Mode: Some Great Reward (reissue)
Eighteen Visions: XVIII
Ellen Allien: Nost
Fleetwood Mac: Boston (reissue)
Flogging Molly: Life Is Good
Foreigner: 40 [vinyl]
Grateful Dead: Road Trips Vol. 4 No. 5 - Boston Music Hall 6/9/76 (3-CD box set)
Grateful Dead: Visions of the Future
Halsey: Hopeless Fountain Kingdom
Iggy Pop: The Idiot (reissue) [vinyl]
Iggy Pop: Lust for Life (reissue) [vinyl]
Iggy Pop: TV Eye (reissue) [vinyl]
Ikonika: Distractions
John Williams: Raiders of the Lost Ark [vinyl]
Kris Kristofferson and Rita Coolidge: Full Moon (reissue) (expanded)
Luke Combs: This One's For You
Manic Street Preachers: Send Away the Tigers: 10 Year Collectors Edition (3-disc box set)
Marika Hackman: I’m Not Your Man
Mekons: Existensialism
North Mississippi Allstars: Prayer for Peace
Peaking Lights: The Fifth State Of Consciousness
Phillip Glass: Life: A Journey Through Time
Roger Waters: Is This The Life We Really Want?
Saint Etienne: Home Counties
Shirley Walker and John Carpenter: Escape from L.A. - Music from the Motion Picture (reissue) [vinyl]
Swans: The Great Annihilator (reissue) [vinyl]
Sweet Baboo: Wild Imagination
Tom Petty: Damn the Torpedoes (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Petty: Full Moon Fever (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Petty: Hard Promises (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Petty: Into the Great Wide Open (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Petty: Let Me Up (I've Had Enough) (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Petty: Long After Dark (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Petty: Pack Up the Plantation: Live! (reissue) [vinyl]
Tom Petty: Southern Accents (reissue) [vinyl]
TOPS: Sugar At The Gate
U2: The Joshua Tree (reissue) (expanded)
U2: The Joshua Tree (4-CD box set) (reissue) (expanded)
Various Artists: The British Invasion (8-CD and 1-DVD box set)
Various Artists: Night Comes Down: 60 British Mod R&B Freakbeat & Swinging London Nuggets
Various Artists: Zaire 74
The Who: Live at The Isle of Wight Festival 2004 (2-CD 1-DVD)


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily book and music news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Why Rebecca Solnit Has Become Essential Feminist Reading, A New Rainer Maria Song, and more)

The New Republic examined why Rebecca Solnit has become essential feminist reading.


Stream a new Rainer Maria song.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn previewed June's best new books.


Aquarium Drunkard shared a mixtape of Peruvian music.


Tin House features new short fiction by Rachel Khong.


BrooklynVegan interviewed singer-songwriter Laura Stevenson.


The Renaissance Society features a new essay by Kate Zambreno


Stereogum interviewed Japanese Breakfast's Michelle Zauner.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Edan Lepucki's novel Woman No. 17.


Rolling Stone shared a video on the making of Radiohead's OK Computer album.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Kristen Radtke.


Stream a new nots song.


Sherman Alexie has a new story in the New Yorker.


Tei Shi played a Stereogum session.


David Sedaris talked to the Guardian about his new book, Theft By Finding.

Read an excerpt from the book.


Stream a new song by the War on Drugs.


An unpublished Edith Wharton play has been uncovered.


Stereogum shared a guide to the music of Mary Timony.


Author Kurt Baumeister interviewed himself at The Nervous Breakdown.

Read an excerpt of his novel Pax Americana.


Stream a new song by She Keeps Bees.


Book Riot previewed June's new graphic novels.


Baeble interviewed Strand of Oaks' Tim Showalter.


The Philadelphia Inquirer interviewed author Yaa Gyaasi.


Stream a new song by Jason Isbell.


British feminists recommended books for bleak times at 50.50.


Noisey reconsidered Geraldine Fibbers' 1968 debut album, Lost Somewhere Between The Earth And My Home.


Garrard Conley discussed his memoir Boy Erased with Mashable.


Stream a new Arcade Fire song.


Elena Lappin shared memoir writing advice at Literary Hub.


Shitkid broke down her album Fish track-by-track at Drowned in Sound.


VICE recommended June's best books, comics, and music.


Stream a previously unreleased Radiohead track.


Roar interviewed Olivia Taylor Smith, executive editor of Unnamed Press.


The Quietus and Paste listed May's best albums.


Pacific Standard interviewed Tommy Pico about his poetry book Nature Poem.


Stream a new Trevor Sensor song.


eBooks on sale for $0.99 today:

A Father's Law by Richard Wright
The Interrogative Mood by Padgett Powell

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Across the Bridge by Mavis Gallant
Blind Ambition by John W. Dean
Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay
The Drowning Season by Alice Hoffman
Finks by Joel Whitney
Gone to Soldiers by Marge Piercy
The Hippest Trip in America by Nelson George
History by Elsa Morante
Insurrections of the Mind by Franklin Foer
The Humans by Matt Haig
Living Like a Runaway by Lita Ford
The Los Angeles Diaries by James Brown
The Memory Place by Mira Bartok
Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto
My Cross To Bear by Gregg Allman
Not My Father's Son by Alan Cumming
An Object of Beauty by Steve Martin
Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck
Post Office by Charles Bukowski
She Got Up Off the Couch by Haven Kimmel
A Widow's Story by Joyce Carole Oates

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful: Three James Herriot Classics
The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
Back to Blood by Thomas Wolfe
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Frog Music by Emma Donohue
The Group, The Company She Keeps, and Birds of America: Three Novels in One Collection by Mary McCarthy
Jackie Under My Skin by Wane Koestenbaum
Land's End by Michael Cunningham

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

And the Band Played on by Randy Shilts
Black Deutschland by Darryl Pinckney
Dry by Augusten Burroughs
A Home at the End of the World by Michael Cunningham



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

June 1, 2017

Book Notes - Sarah Moriarty "North Haven"

North Haven

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Sarah Moriarty's novel North Haven is a lyrical and moving debut.


In her own words, here is Sarah Moriarty's Book Notes music playlist for her debut novel North Haven:



There is a magical place on an island in Maine that feels outside of time. It is a house, a porch, mossy paths through woods, a dirt road, blueberry bushes, rocks, lichen, a dock, a float, a dinghy—all these things are unchanged. When the Willoughby kids are there, they too haven't aged despite the passing of decades. In that house the past and present, their memories and actions, exist simultaneously. Tom, Gwen, Libby, and Danny are not only in their thirties (and twenties, in Danny's case), but they are five, ten, and 12 listening to their parents break china. They are 10, 15, and 17, trying to understand their own sexuality while the existence of it must be totally denied. Danny is a tendril growing unchecked inside their mother. Their parents, Bob and Scarlet, are alive, kisses on Band-Aids, rough hands on wrists, old chairs dragged across the porch. They are silence and disappointment. They are also ghosts lingering in the wallpaper in the closet, in the unmade beds, in the crack in the window; and no amount of ping pong or cocktails or arguments about wind or lobster can seem to vanquish them.

North Haven follows four devoted and dysfunctional adult siblings during their weeklong family vacation at their crumbling summer home. Both parents have died in the last few years and this is the first time the kids have come to the house without either parent. While desperately trying to untangle issues in their own lives, they must also decide whether or not to sell their summerhouse. Through flashbacks we get to see the Willoughby siblings as children and discover how their parents, Scarlet and Bob, influenced each of their lives.

"Marathon" — Tennis
Basically anything by Tennis speaks to the aesthetic of this place, of summer on the water, of life in boats. Of love in boats. Tennis is a husband and wife team that took a year to live on a sailboat together, the original form of cruising. It is both romantic and terrifying and the perfect metaphor for marriage. We should all be so lucky to be able to come out of the first year of marriage, one that is notoriously tough, with a beautiful album. In North Haven three different marriages meet three different ends.

"Band of Gold" — Freda Payne
When Scarlet is alone changing the sheets on her bed and realizing that her husband might not come back, she remembers their wedding night, a moment when they couldn't seem to connect. Bob spent the evening in the hotel bar while she stayed in their suite. This is a direct rip-off from the line in this song, "but that night on our honeymoon, we stayed in separate rooms."

"Government Center" — Modern Lovers
Gwen is an artist and, when between teaching gigs, she temps. At the end of her tenure at a temp job she likes to sew her own subversion into the establishment by filing her own drawings of secretaries rebelling, lighting the copiers on fire, etc. I imagine this song running through her head, "make the secretaries feel better, when they put those stamps on all those letters."

"I Feel the Earth Move" — Carol King
I am on the cusp between Gen X and Gen Y, but because I have older siblings I skew Gen X. This is particularly clear to me in my visceral nostalgic response to music from the late 70's. This was what was on the radio in my formative years, it was the kind of thing that our parents' friends played while we all vacationed in this house. Or at least it is what we listened to when we weren't listing to Godspell, Xanadu, or The Mikado on ancient cassette tapes over the tinny speakers of a boom box. When we (by that I mean me) return to our childhood haunts we can revert back to our younger selves, which can be mirrored in what we listen to. When making dinner together, Danny and his siblings argue over these scant musical options.

"Can't Stand Up Alone" — Clyde McPhatter
This is a song I want played at my funeral, and so it is a song that I associate with the sweet hereafter, where Bob and Scarlet have gone, on their permanent vacation.

"Old Man" — Neil Young
In the final draft of the book the copy editor caught a small moment at the very end of the book when Gwen looks at Tom and thinks, "old man take a look at my life," and of course I hadn't thought about the rights to the lyrics or anything and had to remove it. But it felt so perfect for that moment it was a tough edit to make. That song expresses the truth of the situation and Tom's greatest fear.

"When They Fight, They Fight" — Generationals
This is in honor of Scarlet and Bob who, in the first decade of their marriage, connected through their arguments. Their obsession with each other played out through drama and rage. We see this most through the eyes of the kids, which is the exact tone of this song, sweet and happy, but about something dark and lingering.

"Stay in My Corner" — Arcs
This is what Tom wishes he could say to his wife Melissa, but he is too afraid to admit what he truly wants.

"Road" — Nick Drake
F that stupid Volkswagen ad that co-opted this wonderful song and reminded me that I am officially middle aged because every time I think I've (re)discovered some cool band they are in a Target ad the next day. Sigh. But the dip and swing of this lovely song is night driving, and played in my mind during the scene where the Willoughbys are driving home from a restaurant in the lush reverie of a summer night.

"Fool to Cry" — Rolling Stones
This song is Bob: his guilt, his self-loathing, his desperation for Scarlet's love. Marriage can be a rough business, and not in a sexy way.

"Logical Song" — Supertramp (for big brothers everywhere)
I have been told, "girls don't like Supertramp." There is nothing more obnoxious than being told what you do and don't like. I LOVE Supertramp, in part because I associate it with my adored older brother who, as a teenager, listened to this while drawing races cars and dragons. He was the coolest. And in terms of the lyrics this is Tom's anthem, poor guy. Hearing the "birds in the trees" were a turning point for Tom as a boy, when at dawn the sound would connect him to his sisters now asleep in a different room, and he wouldn't be alone listening to his parents fight. "Life was so wonderful…" but then he had to be sensible to the point of blocking out what he wanted and who he really was. "Tell me who I am," but he doesn't even know who to ask.

"Parents are People" — Marlo Thomas and Friends from Free to Be You and Me
Because sometimes you just want to shake your kid by the shoulders and shout, "I am a fucking person. A person!" I feel that Scarlet probably played this for her children often in the hopes of resisting her own urge to harangue them.

"Left My Wallet in El Segundo" — Tribe Called Quest
This song is directly linked to Danny, the youngest of the Willoughby siblings. Unbeknownst to his siblings, Danny has recently dropped out of college and taken a road trip to Mexico. Somewhere along the way he lost his wallet. But he doesn't really care. His ID still says UNDER 21 is bright red block letters, despite the fact that he just had his boozy birthday a couple of months before. So his ID confirms what the rest of the world keeps telling him, "you will never grow up, never catch up." Now that both of his parents are dead he's not sure he wants to grow up anyway. In my own life, I first heard this song lying on the floor of my older sister's room; I can't listen to Tribe without thinking of her. She introduced me to all the best music.

"Sailing" — Christopher Cross
Ok, I tired to resist putting this cheese ball, nostalgia-driven lite FM special on this list, but I couldn't. I know, it's too easy, so on the nose it hurts, like when I told my sister that the Cardigans' song "Rise and Shine" reminded me of her and she responded, "I'm the only sister you have!" Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar; we can't be nine layers deep in metaphor all the time. I find the minor key of this song so melancholy that it somehow tempers all the schmaltz for me. It actually makes me think of Bob and Scarlet as Danny imagines them in the afterlife sailing away together on "a strong wind from the south." In fact, this song inspired that image in my mind, that and some stills of Katherine Hepburn on a ship. "I'll be yar now, I promise to be yar," "Be whatever you like, you're my redhead." Not everyone can move seamlessly from Christopher Cross to The Philadelphia Story, but since half of what I write is directly inspired by that movie/play, I can trace almost any inspiration back to it.

"Emily" — Joanna Newsom
Oof, this song! It suits many different parts of the book, particularly the sections from summers when the Willoughby kids are kids. Those sections have a similar poetic, dreamy quality. At one point the kids are all lying on the float in the dark gently waving their arms through the galaxy of phosphorescence in the water. Most importantly, this song fits the connection between Gwen and Libby when they are small. Newsom wrote this song about, and for, her sister, and Newsom's love and admiration for Emily radiates out from each strange, haunting note. Gwen and Libby are best friends, and compatriots in the shifting battles of their family. This passage from the song embodies Libby's feelings for Gwen:

Emily, They'll follow your lead by the letter
And I make this claim, and I'm not ashamed to say I know you better
What they've seen is just a beam of your sun that banishes winter
Let us go! Though we know it's a hopeless endeavor
The ties that bind, they are barbed and spined and hold us close forever


Sarah Moriarty and North Haven links:

the author's website


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (June's Best New Books, An Oral History of Radiohead's OK Computer Album, and more)

The Millions and Book Riot previewed June's best new books.


Rolling Stone shared an oral history of the making of Radiohead's OK Computer album.


Vulture and Powell's interviewed Samantha Irby about her new essay collection We Are Never Meeting in Real Life.


Stream a new Broken Social Scene song.


Matt Bell on the writings of Denis Johnson at Electric Literature.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Natalie Mering, AKA Weyes Blood.


Matthew Sharpe talked short fiction with Playboy.


Stream a new Big Thief song.


Fresh Air interviewed David Sedaris about his new book Theft By Finding Diaries (1977-2002).


All Songs Considered interviewed singer-songwriter Brandi Carlile.


Kareem Abdul-Jabbar talked books and reading with the New York Times.


Stream a new Matt Pond PA song.


The Nation interviewed Joel Whitney about his book Finks.


Mountain Goats drummer Jon Wurster discussed the band's new album Goths with SF Weekly.

Willamette Weekly interviewed frontman John Darnielle.


Bookworm interviewed author Claudio Magris.


Stream a new song by David Barbe.


This year's Bram Stoker Award winners have been announced.


Lydia Lunch commented on a variety of music for SPIN.


BookPage interviewed author Elizabeth Strout.


Stream a new Danny Sunshine song.


Literary Hub interviewed author Imbolo Mbue.


Time Out New York profiled singer-songwriter Jay Som.


The Paris Review interviewed Francesco Pacifico about translating his his new novel, Class.


Wooden Wand shared three cover songs at Aquarium Drunkard.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Francesca Segal's novel The Awkward Age.


Double J listed the best Australian songs of the '90s.


The Center for Fiction announced its 2017 Emerging Writer Fellows.


BrooklynVegan interviewed members of the band A Place To Bury Strangers.


John Grisham shared tips on writing popular fiction.


NPR Music is streaming Ani DiFranco's new album Binary.


Publishers Weekly interviewed Paula Byrne about her book The Genius of Jane Austen: Her Love of Theatre and Why She Works in Hollywood.


Luna covered Fleetwood Mac's "One Together."


Booklist recommended Japanese thrillers in translation.


Gorilla Vs Bear shared a mix of May's best music.


Tin House shared an excerpt from Tommy Pico's book Nature Poem.


Stream an unreleased Sadie Dupuis song.


Powell's interviewed Gabe Habash about his debut novel Stephen Florida.


NPR Music is streaming Lindsey Buckingham & Christine McVie's self-titled album.


eBooks on sale for $0.99 today:

A Father's Law by Richard Wright
The Interrogative Mood by Padgett Powell

eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Across the Bridge by Mavis Gallant
Blind Ambition by John W. Dean
Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay
The Drowning Season by Alice Hoffman
Finks by Joel Whitney
Gone to Soldiers by Marge Piercy
The Hippest Trip in America by Nelson George
History by Elsa Morante
Insurrections of the Mind by Franklin Foer
The Humans by Matt Haig
Living Like a Runaway by Lita Ford
The Los Angeles Diaries by James Brown
The Memory Place by Mira Bartok
Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto
My Cross To Bear by Gregg Allman
Not My Father's Son by Alan Cumming
An Object of Beauty by Steve Martin
Pavilion of Women by Pearl Buck
Post Office by Charles Bukowski
She Got Up Off the Couch by Haven Kimmel
A Widow's Story by Joyce Carole Oates

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

All Creatures Great and Small, All Things Bright and Beautiful, and All Things Wise and Wonderful: Three James Herriot Classics
The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
Back to Blood by Thomas Wolfe
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
Frog Music by Emma Donohue
The Group, The Company She Keeps, and Birds of America: Three Novels in One Collection by Mary McCarthy
Jackie Under My Skin by Wane Koestenbaum
Land's End by Michael Cunningham

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

And the Band Played on by Randy Shilts
Black Deutschland by Darryl Pinckney
Dry by Augusten Burroughs
A Home at the End of the World by Michael Cunningham



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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