March 6, 2017

Shorties (Chimamanda Adichie on Her New Book, Peter Hook on His New Order Book, and more)

Chimamanda Adichie talked to the Guardian and All Things Considered about her new book Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions.


CLRVYNT shared an excerpt from Peter Hook's book Substance: Inside New Order.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser
Ball Four by Jim Bouton
Claudius the God by Robert Graves
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
I, Claudius by Robert Graves
L.A. Son by Roy Choi
The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis
Maurice by E.M. Forster
A Passage to India by E.M. Forster
Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Breaks of the Game by David Halberstam
Bruce by Peter Ames Carlin
Sacred Hoops by Phil Jackson
White Line Fever by Lemmy
Woke Up Lonely by Fiona Maazel


George Saunders on the writing of Grace Paley.


The Quietus interviewed Dom Thomas of the psych band Whyte Horses.


Elle profiled author Rebecca Solnit.


The Guardian examined musicians who are incorporating personal trauma into their music.


The LARB Radio Hour interviewed author Sarah Manguso.


Stream a new Shins song.


Elizabeth Strout shared her writing routine with the Guardian.


Sharon Van Etten covered Skeeter Davis's "The End of the World."


Alana Massey talked to VICE about her essay collection All the Lives I Want.


Laura Marling visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


The Rumpus interviewed author Joshua Mohr.


BrooklynVegan interviewed Hurray for the Riff Raff's Alynda Segarra.


Book Riot recommended books by Iranian authors.


Stream a new song by Rob Crow.


TIME listed 30 books you should read before turning 30.


NYCTaper shared a recent Robyn Hitchcock performance.


Literary Hub and Elle recommended March's best new books.


PopMatters interviewed the band Foxygen.


The New York Times explored the literary legacy of Carson McCullers.


Weld for Birmingham interviewed singer-songwriter Craig Finn.


GQ UK listed the best books of all time that you probably haven't heard of.


Singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega shared her favorite books at the New York Times.


Mohsin Hamid talked to Morning Edition about his new novel Exit West.


The band Temples visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Jami Attenberg talked to Weekend Edition about her new novel All Grown Up.


Flavorwire previewed March's music releases.


Tim Parks examined the pitfalls facing politically active writers.


Longreads features an excerpt from Lauren Elkin's book Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice, and London.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

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March 5, 2017

Atomic Books Comics Preview - March 5, 2017

In the weekly Atomic Books Comics Preview, Benn Ray highlights notable new comics, graphic novels, and books.

Benn Ray is the owner of Atomic Books, an independent bookstore in Baltimore. He also runs the Mutant Funnies Tumblr.

Atomic Books has been named one of BuzzFeed's Great American Bookstores, as well as one of Flavorwire's 10 greatest comic and graphic novel stores in America.


All Time Comics: Crime Destroyer #1

All Time Comics: Crime Destroyer #1
by Josh Bayer / Herb Trimpe / Ben Marra

All Time Comics is the beautiful brainchild of Josh Bayer - a sort of alternative superhero mashup where legendary creators (in this case Herb Trimpe with some of his last comic work) team up with fantastic modern artists (in this case the amazing Ben Marra) to tell bizarre superhero stories the likes of which you'll not find anywhere else.


Cinema Sewer #30

Cinema Sewer #30
by Robin Bougie

This new issue marks 20 years of everyone's favorite sleaze cinema zine! And issue 30 features a wealth of great articles, essays, reviews and obscure film recommendations and more! It even comes with a 20 Years Of Cinema Sewer full color pull-out poster.


Family Fun Manual Vol. IV: Rainy Day Craft Projects For When Your Country Has Elected A White Supremacist Who Openly Brags About Sexually Assaulting Women

Family Fun Manual Vol. IV: Rainy Day Craft Projects For When Your Country Has Elected A White Supremacist Who Openly Brags About Sexually Assaulting Women
by Creative Craft Books LLC

This hilarious pamphlet perfectly illustrates what most of rational America goes through on a daily basis. Each craft project starts out perfectly normal, but by the end devolves into distracted fears of what a Trump Presidency means for America and the world.


Presidential Dickerbook: A History Of Dick Moves By Commanders-In-Chief

Presidential Dickerbook: A History Of Dick Moves By Commanders-In-Chief
by Patrick Baker / Elan' Trinidad

This adult sticker book, loaded with Presidential penises for you to affix, looks at some of the biggest dick moves from our Commanders-in-Chief from Washington to Trump. Can you match the penis to the POTUS?


Simply Samuel

Simply Samuel
by Tommi Musturi

Both beautifully psychedelic and intricately constructed, Simply Samuel is a look at individuality, loneliness and the act of living. Mutsuri's art here is, as always, simply stunning.


We Go Out

We Go Out
by Miriam Elia

We Learn At Home

We Learn At Home
by Miriam Elia

These are brilliant parodies of early learning books for children. In We Go Out, Mummy takes her kids Susan and John out for a day trip down a local street to teach her kids about gender, homelessness, public sculpture and luxury redevelopments. In We Learn At Home, Mummy pulls the kids from a "Fascist Scum" school to each her kids at home with a fact-free, feelings-based education.


Questions, concerns, comments or gripes – e-mail benn@atomicbooks.com. If there’s a comic I should know about, send it my way at Atomic, c/o Atomic Books 3620 Falls Rd., Baltimore, MD 21211.


Atomic Books & Benn Ray links:

Atomic Books website
Atomic Books on Twitter
Atomic Books on Facebook
Benn Ray's blog (The Mobtown Shank)
Benn Ray's comic, Mutant Funnies


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Atomic Books Comics Preview lists (weekly new comics & graphic novel highlights)

Online "Best of 2015" Book Lists

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - March 5, 2017

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Terms and Conditions

Terms and Conditions
by Robert Sikoryak

New D+Q! The iTunes Terms and Conditions is the wickedly dense contract that everyone agrees to and nobody reads, until now! Robert Sikoryak’s graphic word-for-word adaptation of the infamous Terms and Conditions has made the unreadable readable, hilariously posing Apple maverick Steve Jobs in an array of classic and contemporary comics—from Archie to Kate Beaton’s Hark a Vagrant. This is a masterful satire from a master satirist!


Primitive Man as Philosopher

Primitive Man as Philosopher
by Paul Radin

Paul Radin was an American folklorist and anthropologist writing in the 1920’s, when anthropology was still young. Primitive Man as Philosopher is a seminal piece of thinking on humans and society; Radin makes a case for “primitive” cultures, giving proof that they are as intellectually sophisticated and enterprising as their “civilized” counterparts. A welcome addition to the NYRB Classics series!


Late Arcade

Late Arcade
by Nathaniel Mackey

A musician known only as N. is part of a jazz sextet called Molimo m’Atet. Late Arcade opens with a letter written by N. and addressed to the enigmatic Angel of Dust. N.’s narration follows the band as they play gigs around America, dedicate cosmic hymns to the sun god Ra, and dream of a late arcade. Nathaniel Mackey’s novel possesses a sinister rhythm and undeniable lyricism, an excellent effort from the American poet.


A Separation

A Separation
by Katie Kitamura

A man and woman decide to end their marriage after five years. He goes to Greece to finish a book and promptly disappears, she receives a call from her mother-in-law begging her to find him. So goes Katie Kitamura’s new novel, a meditation on marriage, loss, love and its dying embers.


Arthur and the Golden Rope

Arthur and the Golden Rope
by Joe Todd-Stanton

This is book #1 in Brownstone’s Mythical Collection, a series recounting the tales of how the Brownstone family amassed their impressive treasures. Arthur and the Golden Rope is the story of “the first adventure a Brownstone ever had”, that of Arthur Brownstone, a young boy from a small Icelandic town who recruited a god to help defeat the beast Fenrir. A beautifully illustrated Nordic tale of fantasy and adventure!


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 3, 2017

Book Notes - Bill Hayes "Insomniac City"

Insomniac City

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Bill Hayes' Insomniac City is a compelling and moving memoir, a testimonial to both New York and his partner Oliver Sacks.

The San Francisco Chronicle wrote of the book:

"Like Patti Smith's haunting M Train, Hayes' book weaves seemingly disparate threads of memory into a kind of sanctuary -- a secret place where one can shake off the treasured relics of past lives and prepare to be reborn anew."


In his own words, here is Bill Hayes' Book Notes music playlist for his memoir Insomniac City:



Certain songwriters, songs, and albums have influenced my writing as much as, if not more than, writers, books, poetry—never more so than with Insomniac City, a memoir about my life in New York and with my partner, the late Oliver Sacks, neurologist and author. I wrote most of the book during a 6-week period in Rome. My iPod on, songs spurring memories, I laid out a first draft page by page by page on the two facing walls of the loft in which I was living. (The walls were covered with bulletin board material.) By the time I’d finished—hundreds of pages pinned up floor to ceiling, with dozens of my street photos intermixed—I realized I’d unconsciously created a book-length equivalent of a 1970s album cover interior, like Joni Mitchell’s Blue or Court and Spark or Hejira—neat columns of text superimposed over photography.

Now, my playlist—thematic, not a chapter-by-chapter replay:

Coming of Age, Jay Z: Raised with five sisters in Spokane, Washington, on Diana Ross and the Supremes, “Soul Train” artists, and seventies singer-songwriters like Joni, I came out as a gay man in SF in the early 1980s, with Madonna and The Smiths on my Walkman. All of which is to say, I hadn’t listened to much hip-hop before moving to NYC at 48—my second coming of age. Here, though, hip hop was what I wanted to hear. Eight years later, I associate this amazingly cinematic song—a duet, really—with my first few months in Manhattan: “It’s time to come up / Gots to lock it down…”

Never Too Much, Luther Vandross: In reality, Bach and Mozart played in the background throughout my life with Oliver (home, office, car), and by his own admission, O knew nothing about popular music. (“What is Michael Jackson?” he asked the day after Michael Jackson died.) But I was also listening to my own soundtrack all along, at the gym or even while swimming with him (waterproof iPod!). For me, this over-the-top Luther song conveys better than Bach could how it felt—feels—to fall in love: “A thousand kisses from you is never too much, I just don't wanna stop / Oh my love….”

Ain’t Nobody, Chaka Khan + Rufus: At the same time I was falling for O, I was falling hard for New York: riding subways, encountering strangers, taking pictures, and this sexy Chaka song somehow captures that feeling: “I wait for nighttime to come / And bring you to me / Can't believe I'm the one / I was so lonely / I feel like no one could feel / I must be dreamin'….”

Your Cloud, Tori Amos: What comes after falling in love is just as nice, but different. As you settle and make a life together, it’s as if your soul is at peace for finding its mate. This dreamy cut evokes that state: “If there is a horizontal line that runs from the map of your body straight through the land… will this horizontal line, when asked, know how to find where you end, where I begin?”

Born Under Punches, Talking Heads: Long before moving here, my romanticized vision of the city was influenced by New York bands I listened to when I was 19 or 20, like the Patti Smith Band and Television and Talking Heads. This cut from the 1980 funk-infused masterpiece Remain in Light is a sonic expression of New York at its most intense, whether in a traffic jam or packed subway, with heat and humidity so high it’s suffocating: “All I want is to breathe. Won’t you breathe with me? Find a little space, so we move in between….”

Undo, Bjork: O and I visited Iceland several times, and fell in love with the country, although it was so unlike any other it seemed more like another planet. I love the message and vibe of this supernaturally beautiful Bjork song, exactly what one should play if stuck in one of those traffic jams mentioned above—or if, say, you’ve just had a little squabble with your beloved: “It’s not meant to be a strife / It’s not meant to be a struggle uphill / Surrender….”

There, There, Radiohead: The ultimate bad-news song (those drums!): Not such a bummer that you’ll be in tears, but not falsely sentimental either. I love how the ambiguous title phrase doubles as both a reassurance and a clinical clarification: “there, there.” This is the song that blared in my ears when O got a terminal cancer diagnosis in January 2015.

We Belong Together, Mariah Carey: Okay, now you can have a good cry. Pop music can get away with sentimentality when it’s as well produced, well sung, and simple, as this: “I’m trying to keep it together, but I’m falling apart / When you left, I lost a part of me / It’s still so hard to believe / We belong together….”

Court and Spark, Joni Mitchell: I led two lives in Insomniac City, one in Manhattan, one in the apartment with O. Our domestic life was quiet—cooking, talking, music, books—no computers. This Joni song is about a different kind of relationship altogether, and set in California, but even so, something in its wistfulness reminds me of O and our time together: “His eyes were the color of the sand and the sea, and the more he talked to me, the more he reached me…”

Time (Clock of The Heart), Boy George and Culture Club: I want my playlist to go out on a few pretty songs, and this is one of my favorites—Boy George’s voice at its most luscious and poignant: “Time is precious, I know…”

Goldberg Variations (for strings), variation#14, J.S. Bach: Britten Sinfonia and Thomas Gould: The purest expression of joy I’ve yet to hear, by O’s favorite composer, and in a thrilling performance by violinist Thomas Gould. Gould played this live at Oliver’s memorial service at the Royal College of Physicians in London, April of 2016.


Bill Hayes and Insomniac City links:

the author's website
video trailer for the book

Kirkus Reviews review
New York Times review
Publishers Weekly review
San Francisco Chronicle review

NPR Books review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - March 3, 2017

David Bazan

David Bazan's Care, Jenn Grant's Paradise, and Tim Kasher's No Resolution are all new albums I can recommend this week.

Vinyl reissues include Ennio Morricone's The Thing score and Lambchop: Is a Woman.

What new music are you looking forward to or enjoying this week?


This week's interesting music releases:

Alexis Taylor: Listen With(out) Piano
Animal Collective: Hollindagain (reissue) [vinyl]
Blanck Mass: World Eater
Bleached: Can You Deal? [vinyl]
Bob Dylan: The Real Royal Albert Hall 1966 Concert [vinyl]
Bombadil: Fences
The Books: The Lemon of Pink (reissue) [vinyl]
Chicano Batman: Freedom Is Free
Colin Hay: Fierce Mercy
David Bazan: Care
Ed Sheeran: Divide
Ennio Morricone: The Thing (reissue) [vinyl]
George Jones: George Jones & The Smoky Mountain Boy (reissue) [vinyl]
Grandaddy: Last Place
Guy Clark: The Best of the Dualtone Years
Jenn Grant: Paradise
Knife In The Water: Reproduction
Lambchop: Is a Woman (reissue) [vinyl]
Methyl Ethel: Everything Is Forgotten
Minus the Bear: VOIDS
The Monkees: Head Alternate
Moving Units: Collision with Joy Division [vinyl]
The Muffs: Happy Birthday to Me [vinyl]
Nadia Reid: Preservation
Ronald Bruner Jr.: Triumph
Sleaford Mods: English Tapas
Sondre Lerche: Pleasure
Temples: Volcano
The Kernal: Light Country
Tim Kasher: No Resolution
Various Artists: Hillbillies in Hell
Various Artists: Spamilton
The Waifs: Ironbark
Why?: Moh Lhean


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

Essential and Interesting "Best of 2016" Music Lists

weekly music release lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Ta-Nehisi Coates on Writing Comics, Lou Reed's Archives To Be Made Available to the Public, and more)

The New York Times interviewed Ta-Nehisi Coates about writing comics.


The New York Public Library will make Lou Reed's archives available to the public.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser
Ball Four by Jim Bouton
Claudius the God by Robert Graves
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
I, Claudius by Robert Graves
L.A. Son by Roy Choi
The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis
Maurice by E.M. Forster
A Passage to India by E.M. Forster
Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Breaks of the Game by David Halberstam
Bruce by Peter Ames Carlin
Sacred Hoops by Phil Jackson
White Line Fever by Lemmy
Woke Up Lonely by Fiona Maazel


Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Vulture, GQ, VICE, and Men's Journal previewed March's best new books.


Broadly interviewed author Cara Hoffman.


Jason Lytle talked to Paste about the Grandaddy reunion.


Mohsin Hamid recommended works of transnational literature at Five Weeks.


BrooklynVegan listed essential psychedelic soul songs.


The New York Times recommended recently published fiction by Argentinian writers.


Stream a new Bardo Pond song.


Ross Raisin talked to the Guardian about his novel A Natural.


Stream a new Sondre Lerche song.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Frederick Luis Aldama.


Stream a new Juliana Hatfield song.


The Rumpus interviewed author Maggie Shipstead.


The Cleveland Scene profiled Dinosaur Jr.


The Guardian profiled author Jessa Crispin.


The Austin American-Statesman shared a playlist of 181 songs about Texas.


Bookforum interviewed Kelly Luce about her novel Pull Me Under.


WGN Radio interviewed singer-songwriter Craig Finn.


PopMatters and the OTHERPPL podcast interviewed Min Jin Lee about her novel Pachinko.


Stream a new song by Beach Fossils.


Bookworm interviewed author Alvaro Enrigue.


Vol.1 Brooklyn interviewed author Donald Quist.


Drowned in Sound reconsidered Elliott Smith's Either/Or album.


Author Mary Miller shared her daily routine at Catching Days.


Pitchfork interviewed Snail Mail's Lindsey Jordan.


Steph Post interviewed author Berit Ellingsen about her short story collection Vessel and Solsvart.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 2, 2017

Book Notes - Deborah Willis "The Dark and Other Love Stories"

The Dark and Other Love Stories

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Deborah Willis's compelling short story collection The Dark and Other Love Stories explores love in all its forms.

Kirkus Reviews wrote of the book:

"These are low-key stories of great acuity, precision, and poignancy."


In her own words, here is Deborah Willis's Book Notes music playlist for her short story collection The Dark and Other Love Stories:



I rarely listen to music when I write, but when I started thinking about the music that inspired my book, songs came to mind easily. It took me eight years to complete my collection of stories about love in all its guises, titled The Dark and Other Love Stories. To put that in musical terms, when I started working on the book I was still taking breaks by dancing around my apartment to "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)," and by the end I took breaks by dancing to "Formation." But beyond Beyoncé—who gave me respite from work and inspired me to work harder ("What Would Beyoncé Do?" is the slogan I whisper to myself when I'm tired and don't want to proofread that damn story one more time)—here is a list of the music that most influenced my book.

"Bring Our Boys Home" by Kris Demeanor
I have the good fortune of living with a musician, so I'm surrounded by LPs and guitars and there's often a guy around who can actually play those guitars and an carry a tune (as opposed to me and the cat, two creatures who can do neither). When I think of which musician has had the greatest influence on my writing, it's easy to guess that it would be the one I live with. Kris Demeanor's lyrics are moving, intelligent, politically engaged, and hilarious (of course, I would think that!), all qualities that I aspire to in my own work. One of my favourite songs, and one that has taught me a lot about how to tell a story using an experimental structure, is "Bring Our Boys Home." Kris conveys all the loneliness, heartache, boredom and privilege of a woman who has just moved out to the suburbs and is waiting for her husband to come home from work. She talks on the phone to a girlfriend, and we hear only her side of the conversation—it's a story-song that is catchy, subtle, and sad.

"Bee's Wing" by Richard Thompson
I came across this song thanks to Kris (that awesome guy mentioned above), who played it for me one evening after dinner. I had been struggling for months with a story about a man with an alcohol addiction, somehow unable to find the right voice and structure. But something about "Bee's Wing"—a gorgeous, melancholy song that is, in some ways, about addiction—moved me so much that it cracked my brain open and I was able to see my own work more clearly. I went to bed, then woke up in the middle of the night with the entire narrative laid out in my mind. I'll never forget that moment, because creative gifts like that arrive so rarely.

Symphony of Sorrowful Songs by Górecki
I listened to this non-stop, in a Discman (have I mentioned it took me a while to write this book?) while I was traveling in Russia. Don't ask me why—Górecki is Polish, so it makes little sense. But something about the music fit my mood and the weather and the atmosphere of St. Petersburg. And when I got home, I kept listening to Górecki's heartbreaking masterpiece as I wrote "Hard Currency," a story set in Russia.

"Out of Range" by Ani Difranco
One of my stories is set at a Jewish summer camp in the 1990s, in Alberta, Canada—a place not unlike the Jewish summer camp I attended and worked at for twelve summers. There are so many artists and bands that remind me of those long, dry, summer days—R.E.M., The Tragically Hip, The Indigo Girls—but Ani Difranco is top of the list. I remember waking up from a nap when I was about 13, the same age as the girls in my story, and hearing "Out of Range" spinning in the CD player. Like most girls trying to figure out sexuality and feminism and politics, I was obsessed with Ani. But listening to that song now brings back a flood of other musical memories too. Remember Lilith Fair? Remember Tori Amos? Remember Hole and Alanis Morissette? Remember when even white, mainstream women artists all sounded very different one from the other, and the radio wasn't only devoted to one sound? That was the musical landscape of my adolescence, and I imagined it was for my characters too.

Music for Cats by David Teie
For real. I have a cat, and she's neurotic. Especially in the mornings—she's basically out of her mind between 8am and 11am. And the mornings happen to be when I'm most alert and productive, when I'm most wanting to focus on my writing. But the cat wants to sit on my lap, and climb on my shoulder, and walk on my keyboard, and yell at me, and go outside, and come inside, and go outside again, and come inside…. So I downloaded a few songs of Teie's Music for Cats, feline-calming songs he developed by basing the rhythm on that of a cat's heartbeat. "Rusty's Ballad," in particular, seemed to help the cat to relax. So I can thank Teie for at least a few minutes of uninterrupted work time.


Deborah Willis and The Dark and Other Love Stories links:

Globe and Mail interview with the author
Kirkus reviewhttps://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/deborah-willis/the-dark-and-other-love-stories/
Minneapolis Star Tribune review
PopMatters review

Calgary Herald profile of the author
Freedom Matters interview with the author
Kirkus profile of the author
Largehearted Boy playlist by the author for Vanishing and Other Stories
National Post profile of the author
Vancouver Sun interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (The Continued Relevance of the Works of James Baldwin, Stream the New Hurray for the Riff Raff Album, and more)

Radio Open Source examined the continued relevance of the works of James Baldwin.


NPR Music is streaming the new Hurray for the Riff Raff album The Navigator.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser
Ball Four by Jim Bouton
Claudius the God by Robert Graves
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
I, Claudius by Robert Graves
L.A. Son by Roy Choi
The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis
Maurice by E.M. Forster
A Passage to India by E.M. Forster
Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Breaks of the Game by David Halberstam
Bruce by Peter Ames Carlin
Sacred Hoops by Phil Jackson
White Line Fever by Lemmy
Woke Up Lonely by Fiona Maazel


Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Vulture, GQ, VICE, and Men's Journal previewed March's best new books.


Stream a new Thunder Dreamer song.


Stream a new Trans Am song.


Melissa Febos talked to Publishers Weekly about her new memoir.


Temples visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


Peter Hook talked to VICE about his book Substance: Inside New Order.


Stream a new Wavves track.


Guernica interviewed Melissa Febos about her new memoir Abandon Me.


Beck talked to the New York Times about his forthcoming album.


Guernica interviewed Melissa Febos about her new memoir Abandon Me.


Stream a new song by Juana Molina.


Author Jeff VanderMeer was interviewed by the Reddit community.


Stream a new She-Devils song.


Fiction Writers Review interviewed author Jim Shepherd.


Stream a new Filthy Friends song.


Recommended Reading shared an excerpt from Julie Buntin's debut novel Marlena.


NPR Music is streaming the new Jay Som album Everybody Works.


The Evergreen Review has been reestablished as an online journal.


Stream a new Holy Sons song.


OUPblog interviewed translator and publisher Ilan Stavans.


Stream a new song by the Drums.


New England Public Radio interviewed poet Ocean Vuong.


NPR Music shared 100 songs (for streaming and/or download) of artists playing SXSW this year.


Bustle listed March's best new fiction.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Alynda Lee Segarra of Hurray for the Riff Raff.


Outlook Springs features new short fiction by Tim Horvath.


The Record profiled singer-songwriter Jens Lekman.


The Iowa Review features new short fiction by Annie DeWitt.


Paste recommended ska albums for people who don't like ska.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

March 1, 2017

Book Notes - Rowan Hisayo Buchanan "Harmless Like You"

Harmless Like You

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Rowan Hisayo Buchanan's novel is a dazzling debut about family, home, and love. One of the best books I have read this year.

The Literary Review wrote of the book:

"Each way of life we choose necessitates the rejection of many others. Hisayo Buchanan's recognition of this fact propels her stylishly written debut into the exceptional."


In her own words, here is Rowan Hisayo Buchanan's Book Notes music playlist for her debut novel Harmless Like You:



Harmless Like You is about characters trying to find home. As I wrote the novel, I moved between New York, Wisconsin, and London. I could call this a travel playlist almost as easily as I could call this a playlist for my novel.

"Revolution"—The Beatles

"Revolution" starts Chapter 1 of Harmless Like You. It came into my life many years ago. I was so small that as I sat in the front seat of the car, my feet didn’t touch the floor. I must have heard the recording before, but it only broke into my brain in my best friend’s mother’s car. Out the window, the sky swept past. I didn’t understand the politics that the Beatles were singing about. Yet the song’s joy spun through me. Even as a kid, I was a worrier. But when they sang it was going to be alright—I believed them.

"New York, I Love You, But You’re Bringing Me Down"—LCD Soundsystem

There are so many New York songs. This one is mine. If you go on YouTube you can watch Kermit sing that New York is freaking him out. It’s the perfect stroke of self-pity and self-mockery. Harmless Like You is in many ways a New York book. But I wrote the majority of the novel after I moved away from the city. I missed it. I even missed hating it.

"Kushimoto Bushi"—Chiemi Eri

"Kushimoto Bushi" is a surprising song. It opens with the brass sound of a big band. You expect the song to open up into American jazz or swing. Instead, Chiemi Eri begins a Japanese folk song about a small fishing village. She was singing in a post-war Japan that was trying to figure out how to be Japanese and how to be Western. The question was political, sorrowful, and stressful. The beats of this song somehow made it seem like reconciliation was something you could dance your way into.

Yuki Oyama, one of the protagonists of my novel, was born in Japan, but grows up in New York. She can’t dance her way into belonging, but I know she wishes that she could.

"Leaving on a Jet Plane"—Peter, Paul, and Mary

The most obvious connection is that a lot of Harmless Like You is about when and how to leave. It is a book about a mother who leaves her son. It is a book about a girl whose parents, friend, and lover leave her. It is a book about a man who wants to leave his child.

I left New York for the Midwest, perhaps not the most glamourous of departures. To write the book, I’d entered something which I joked was my Art Nun phase. I wore almost entirely loose garments. I ate repetitively—eggs, beans, rice—on rotation. To mix it up sometimes, I’d add dumplings or a sweet potato. I don’t want to make it sound too bleak. I made a few friends in Wisconsin and at times we went out. I enjoyed being an Art Nun. My graduate program was funded, and I had few responsibilities. I taught one class a week, took two classes, ate, read, and slept.

This routine was only broken when I returned to New York for short visits. The whole flight, I’d feel the city rising towards me. Once there, I’d dart around, frantically chasing down the people I loved. I was afraid. They had not just been sitting there waiting for me. What if their lives had moved on too far for me to ever catch up? Leaving on a Jet Plane captures the strange half-delight of leaving with the somewhat selfish desire that the person you’re leaving will wait for you.

"Wichita Lineman"—Glen Campbell

Glen Campbell croons the thin few lyrics of "Wichita Lineman." The song has about half a story. It’s clearly about need, someone on an open road, and a telephone operator. But mostly, it is a feeling.

When you sit down and dial or click a telephone number, it’s a moment of clear decision to reach out. In Harmless Like You, there are a few desperate telephone calls. But there are also calls that aren’t made. There are calls that should have been made. And sometimes, even when the number goes through, the characters realise they don’t know exactly what to say.

I was in a relationship that started just after I began writing Harmless Like You. It lasted three years—ending shortly after I signed my publishing contract. The person I was with was good, intelligent, and kind but our lives pushed us further and further apart. The relationship began long distance and only got longer. He moved continents. Then I moved continents. Then he moved back. We’d known each other before we started dating, and that made the distance seem possible. Our relationship lived in the phone lines, wireless and with a pervasive sense of longing.

"Darling Be Home Soon"—Lovin’ Spoonful

One of the places characters in Harmless Like You try to make a home is in love. They have mixed success. Many, but not all, of the songs on this playlist are from the 1960s and 70s. Much, but not all, of my novel is set in those decades. And so, I’ve chosen a love song from the 60s.

When John Sebastian wrote, "Darling Be Home Soon," he was twenty-two. The song supposes that a quarter of the singer’s life has almost past. And that he’s now come to see himself at last. I’m not sure I believe him. Who really knows themselves by twenty-two? But wouldn’t it be lovely if you could?

"Homeward Bound"—Simon & Garfunkel

When I was a baby, and I couldn’t sleep, my father would sing me Simon & Garfunkel. I left England for New York and I thought I’d never move back. I wrote a novel about the difficulty of knowing where home is or how to get there. In the very last stretches of editing the book, I returned to live for a time in my childhood bedroom. I set up a desk by the window. I tried to be okay and, in the end, I was.


Rowan Hisayo Buchanan and Harmless Like You links:

the author's website

BookPage review
Kirkus review
Los Angeles Review of Books review
Publishers Weekly review
Sydney Morning Herald review

Bustle profile of the author
Foyles interview with the author
Guardian profile of the author
Weekend Edition profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (March's Best New Books, A New Sylvan Esso Song, and more)

Signature, Flavorwire, Book Riot, and The Millions previewed March's must-read books.


Stream a new Sylvan Esso song.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser
Ball Four by Jim Bouton
Claudius the God by Robert Graves
Hocus Pocus by Kurt Vonnegut
I, Claudius by Robert Graves
L.A. Son by Roy Choi
The Man Who Fell to Earth by Walter Tevis
Maurice by E.M. Forster
A Passage to India by E.M. Forster
Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Breaks of the Game by David Halberstam
Bruce by Peter Ames Carlin
Sacred Hoops by Phil Jackson
White Line Fever by Lemmy
Woke Up Lonely by Fiona Maazel


John Darnielle talked to Iowa Public Radio and WGN Radio about his new novel Universal Harvester.


The 2007 recipients of the Windham Campbell Prizes have been announced.

Congratulations to Largehearted Boy Book Notes contributor Andre Alexis.


NYCTaper shared a recent Sloppy Heads performance.


Sam Lipsyte interviewed George Saunders at BOMB.


Pure Bathing Culture covered Elton John's "Sacrifice."


Hanya Yanagihara shared an essay on the town of Karuizawa at T Magazine.


Stream a new Land of Talk song.


Literary Hub recommended essays that would make great movies.


Stream a new song by A Place to Bury Strangers bassist Dion Lunadon.


The Paris Review interviewed author Christine Lincoln.


Clash interviewed Kim Gordon.


Tin House shared an excerpt from Melissa Febos's new memoir Abandon Me.


Stream a new Thurston Moore song.


The Rumpus interviewed Lauren Elkin about her new book Flâneuse: Women Walk the City in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice, and London.


The A.V. Club is streaming Dreamdecay's new album .


The Guardian noted the continued relevance of Robert Lowell's poetry on the 100th anniversary of his birth.


Stream a new Craig Finn song.


Book Riot recommended February's best comics.


The A.V. Club is streaming Tim Kasher's new album No Resolution.


Pittsburgh City Paper interviewed Roxane Gay.

"There are so many stories [in rural America] that all too often go untold, and I love being able to tell them. I love writing about isolation and small communities where everybody knows each other, and having so much space while still feeling claustrophobic."


Stream a new song by The Districts.


Macleans interviewed author Viet Thanh Nguyen.


The A.V. Club previewed March's new albums.


Flavorwire interviewed Jaroslav Kalfar about his debut novel Spaceman of Bohemia.


Stream a new song by You'll Never Get to Heaven.


NBC News examined the continuing relevance of Maxine Hong Kingston's novel The Woman Warrior after 40 years.


Drowned in Sound interviewed members of the band Josefin Öhrn And The Liberation.


Kate Zambreno discussed her new book Book of Mutter with The Creative Independent.


Paste listed great jazz covers of pop songs.


George Saunders talked to Fast Co. Create about the virtual reality promo for his debut novel Lincoln in the Bardo.


CLRVYNT listed great rock set videos from public access television.


Kay Redfield Jamison talked to Fresh Air about her new book Robert Lowell, Setting the River on Fire.


Frank Turner interviewed John K Samson at the Independent.


The Millions interviewed author Masha Gessen.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

February 28, 2017

Book Notes - Eleni Sikelianos "Make Yourself Happy"

Make Yourself Happy

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Eleni Sikelianos's poetry collection Make Yourself Happy is bold and observant, an arresting volume on happiness.

Library Journal wrote of the book:

"Electric as a lightning storm, wild as a first-growth forest, protean as fantasy's shape-shifters—that's Sikelianos's poetry, a real pleasure to read."


In her own words, here is Eleni Sikelianos's Book Notes music playlist for her poetry collection Make Yourself Happy:



I actually listened to more animal sounds than human songs while writing this book. For example, the baiji, also known as the Chinese river dolphin, last sighted in 2007:

http://www.dosits.org/files/dosits/baiji_whistle.mp3

I hear this recording with my heart rather than my ears. It just physically bypasses my head and lands somewhere in the chest. It’s piercing in innumerable ways. Putting a simile to it might lessen that puncturing, but it does sound like someone rubbing, if someone could rub pleadingly, a window with a dry cloth.

The question that drove the first poems in Make Yourself Happy was, in the simplest way, how to live. The opening section is devoted to that, to the ways we find and lose happiness. We’re in a time when we have to reflect and deflect a lot of darkness, when art needs to work through a lot of calamity, and I wanted the poems, as a counterpoint, to delight in that sensorial buoyancy that for me is singular to poetry. Around that time, I discovered a definition of life that really spoke to me, in a book by the great feminist biologist Lynn Margulis. She borrowed it from two Chilean cognitive scientists, Varela and Maturana: life, in the biological instance, is any organism’s ability to self-produce (the Chileans named this ''autopoeisis''). By extension, I thought, the pursuit of happiness is a self-making endeavor. But you can’t follow that line of thinking long without stumbling into our self-making undoing others’ self-making. Thus, the second section of the book is a devotional to animals from each continent that have gone extinct in modern times. I had a vision (while under the influence of yage) of all the animal sounds and movements making up the fabric of the earth. Their hooves and paws and caws were creating the first blanket/atmosphere of earth, and then they were performing a ghost dance. In the vision, I understood that we will never be able to take away their making of earth’s acoustics, even as we are snipping threads in the aural fabric.

One of the lost sounds that struck me was from an animal that is still hanging on, the 'alalā, or Hawaiian crow, which lives only captivity now. It’s no longer exposed to its natural predators, and because of that the species has forgotten their danger call. You can listen to some recordings of the 'alalā at the great Macaulay Library (part of the lab of ornithology at Cornell), which has been doing field recordings since 1929, and has archived over 175,000 animal sounds.

http://macaulaylibrary.org

You can listen to the 'alalā here:

http://macaulaylibrary.org/search?media_collection=1&taxon_id=11999184&taxon_rank_id=67&q=Hawaiian+Crow

A song that captures the generative dark that is part of our current palette is Thurston Moore’s ''Mina Loy,'' which I first heard him perform at Naropa a few summers ago. Mina Loy was the badass feminist poet novelist lamp designer bohemian, whose 1914 ''Feminist Manifesto'' says: ''There is no half-measure, no scratching on the surface of the rubbish heap…Nothing short of Absolute Demolition will bring about reform.'' Could these be just the words we need right now? Moore’s song contains the lines ''Found a diamond in the gutter/On an early morning freeze/In your mouth it turns to water/Onyx eyes swallow me.''

I made a few great musical discoveries while writing this book, first among them Xylouris White. Check out anything on their first album; try, say, ''Chicken Song,'' which Jem Cohen did a film for. I happened to be in Paris when they were doing a concert there, which led, in a roundabout way, to being invited to a baptism while at a funeral for a shepherd turned World War II resistance fighter on Crete. It’s a long story, but it found my husband (novelist Laird Hunt) and I on the crest of a hill in the middle of olive groves looking giddily down on the Mediterranean while a crying, naked child was dipped in a cauldron of — was it olive oil? And left us at three a.m. in a seaside taverna with Giorgos Xylouris and his friends doing insane foot-slapping dances to live music. We were amongst the first to leave; the Greeks were at it till sunrise. Later, we learned the child being baptized was the daughter of lyra player Stelio Patrakis. Check out ΟΙ ΔΙΚΟΙ ΜΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΙ (''My Friends''). The moral of this story is Cretan music is alive and well, being made with a sense of tradition and innovation at once.

Xylouris White led me to the head-explosion of Marisa Anderson, when I happened to be in Providence for another show, and she opened for them. Her solo electric guitar sound was so rich, my friend joked that she had a second guitarist hiding behind the scenes. Check out her ''Battle Hymn of the Republic,'' from an album devoted to playing the music ''that belongs to all of us,'' as she put it; they haven’t made it private — yet.

I can’t get enough of ''#14'' (''I was Born to Be Your Poet'') from AroarA’s (formerly Broken Social Scene) adaptation of Alice Notley’s book of poems In the Pines (itself inspired by listening to Bob Dylan, Leadbelly, and folk music while receiving Interferon treatments)

Also on the playlist while writing:

Brian Eno, Music for Airports. For his ambient series, Eno meant to write music ''as ignorable as it is interesting,'' and that’s why this works for me for writing in a way that lots of music doesn’t. It allows my thoughts and imagination to run wild in fields of their own making.

Kronos Quartet, ''Dark Was the Night'' (but of course Blind Willie Johnson was there first).

Paul Simon, ''The Werewolves Are Coming.'' Not for writing, but for making your coffee before writing, and, boy, did he see the werewolves on the horizon.

Kristi Stassinopolou/Greekadelia, Έρχομαι κι εσύ κοιμάσαι or Majnoun (traditional Persian song sung in Greek Stassinopoulos)

Coming down the pike: YG and Nipsey Hussle, ''FDT''. This doesn’t have anything to do with writing this book, but has a lot to do with our current moment. I heard it booming out of a car on my way home from the Women’s March in Denver, and thought: that’s the new anthem.


Eleni Sikelianos and Make Yourself Happy links:

the author's Wikipedia page
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Publishers Weekly review
Vertigo review

Colorado Public Radio interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for You Animal Machine (The Golden Greek)
The Museum of Americana interview with the author
The Ribbon interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (New Zadie Smith Fiction, An Interview with Craig Finn, and more)

The New Yorker features new fiction by Zadie Smith.


Salon interviewed singer-songwriter Craig Finn.


John Darnielle talked to Bookforum about his new novel Universal Harvester.


Entertainment Weekly shared an excerpt from Celeste Ng's forthcoming novel Little Fires Everywhere.


Stream a new song by Diamanda Galas.


The New York Public Library has announced the finalists for the Helen Bernstein Book Award for Excellence in Journalism.


Stream a new song by Peaking Lights.


Patty Yumi Cottrell talked to the Los Angeles Review of Books about her stunning debut novel Sorry to Disrupt the Peace.


Aquarium Drunkard interviewed poet and musician Ethan Miller.


Five Questions interviewed author Tracy O'Neill.


BrooklynVegan is streaming Dead Leaf Echo's new EP Strawberry Skin.


Laird Barron recommended books for weird fiction/horror fans.


Ryan Adams covered Bruce Springsteen's "Streets of Philadelphia."


Signature recommended books about the east-west culture gap.


World Cafe profiled the band Bonny Doon.


The Granta podcast interviewed author Diane Williams.


Gorilla vs. Bear shared a mix of February's best songs.


Signature recommended a literary guide to books about governments.


Pitchfork reconsidered Weezer's debut album.


New Scientist noted that China's golden age for science fiction is now.


Wu Orleans mashes up Mardi Gras music with the Wu Tang Clan.


Paste listed every Oscar-winning movie based on a book or play.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons
In Gratitude by Jenny Diski
Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton
Nashville Chrome by Rick Bass
Our Noise: The Story of Merge Records, the Indie Label That Got Big and Stayed Small
A Replacement Life by Boris Fishman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Master by Colm Toibin
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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