September 29, 2017

Shorties (An Interview with Durga Chew-Bose, L7's First New Song in 18 Years, and more)

The Creative Independent interviewed author Durga Chew-Bose.


Stream L7's first new song in 18 years.


Hazlitt interviewed author Lauren McKeon.


Stream a new First Aid Kit song.


Stephen King and Owen King discussed their new novel Sleeping Beauties with Morning Edition.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Alex Edkins of the band METZ.


Zack McDermott discussed his memoir Gorilla and the Bird with Paste.


Stream Laura Jane Grace's cover of the Mountain Goats' "Best Ever Death Metal Band in Denton" (from a forthcoming tribute album).


Edward St. Aubyn talked to the New York Times about Dunbar, his new adaptation of Shakespeare’s King Lear.


NPR Music is streaming the new Weaves album, Wide Open.


Signature recommended fall's best new poetry collections.


Broken Social Scene visited The Current for an interview and live performance.


Author Tod Goldberg interviewed himself at The Nervous Breakdown.


Torres broke down her new album Three Futures track-by-track at All Songs Considered.


Literary Hub recommended October's best crime fiction.


Stream a new Who Is She? song.


The Rumpus interviewed author Andrew Battershill.


Protomartyr's Joe Casey broke down the band's new album Relatives In Descent at All Songs Considered.


BookPage interviewed author Jamie Ford.


Stream a new Langhorne Slim song.



eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Bagombo Snuff Box by Kurt Vonnegut
The Constant Gardener by John le Carre
Deadeye Dick by Kurt Vonnegut
Devotion by Dani Shapiro
Georgia O'Keefe by Roxana Robinson
The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle
The Last Gentleman by Walker Percy
Lean on Pete by Willy Vlautin
Loner by Teddy Wayne
My Name Is Leon by Kit de Waal
North Haven by Sarah Moriarty
Palm Sunday by Kurt Vonnegut
Stones from the River by Ursula Hegi
The Temple of Gold by William Goldman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Girl waits with Gun by Amy Stewart
The Narrow Door by Paul Lisicky
Native Believer by Ali Eteraz

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

All About Lulu by Jonathan Evison
Goddess of Buttercups & Daisies by Martin Millar
Memoirs of a Porcupine by Alain Mabanckou
My Happy Life by Lydia Millet
The Palace of Illusions by Kim Addonizio
They Live by Jonathan Lethem



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us





September 28, 2017

Book Notes - Daniel Kane "'Do You Have a Band?'"

Do You Have a Band?

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Daniel Kane's "Do You Have a Band?" is a fascinating and compelling exploration of how the second generation of the New York School of poets influenced punk musicians (and vice versa).

Thurston Moore wrote of the book:

"Daniel Kane’s 'Do You Have a Band' illuminates the connection of Richard Hell, Tom Verlaine, Patti Smith to Ted Berrigan, Anne Waldman, Bernadette Mayer, and beyond. The dialogue among poets hanging out at CBGB and punk rock pioneers reading at the Poetry Project in early-seventies NYC is where so many of us in the sonic-lit lineage enter, charmed into the future."


In his own words, here is Daniel Kane's Book Notes music playlist for his book "Do You Have a Band?": Poetry and Punk Rock in New York City:



Musicians such as Lou Reed, Richard Hell, and Patti Smith are often described as "poetic" in their approach to making music, writing lyrics, and developing a punk style. In my book Do You Have a Band? I discuss what "poetic" actually means in the context of proto-punk and punk rock in New York City. While it is widely known that punk musicians read French Symbolist and Beat poetry, I highlight how they were also influenced by the work of the New York School poets whom they shared downtown's streets, stages, and mimeograph and letterpress pages. These exchanges influenced punk style and sound in fascinating and complex ways.

Correspondingly, poets like Eileen Myles, John Giorno, and Dennis Cooper turned to punk to develop innovative ideas for their own poetics and performance styles. I hope my book inspires people to read a range of poets whose debts to punk music have proved consistently generative, and to hear and think about New York proto-punk and punk rock with fresh, poetry-inclined ears.

For this playlist, then, I've gathered together representative performances in an effort to illustrate the vibrant conversation that took place in downtown New York City between punk rock and poetry. Enjoy!

The Fugs – "I Saw the Best Minds of My Generation Rot"

The Fugs' adaptation of Allen Ginsberg's poem "Howl" is generally known as "I Saw the Best Minds of My Generation Rock," even though its given title on the jacket of the original E.S.P LP Virgin Fugs is "I Saw the Best Minds of My Generation Rot." In the song, Steve Weber and Peter Stampfel (the founding members of The Holy Modal Rounders, another important proto-punk downtown band) apply exaggerated falsetto harmonies, adenoidal vocals, and skiffle rhythms to the performance. These sounds, circling around and at times overwhelming lead singer and Fugs cofounder Ed Sanders's own delivery, make Ginsberg's predominantly serious long poem feel somewhat silly. In doing so, the song questions the countercultural eminence "Howl" and Ginsberg had attained by the mid-1960s.

The Velvet Underground – "The Murder Mystery"

"The Murder Mystery" appeared initially as a song on The Velvet Underground (1969), the band's third full-length album. Poet and editor Tom Clark published the lyrics to "The Murder Mystery" in the fifty-third issue of the Paris Review (1972). This issue featured numerous poets affiliated with the New York School including John Ashbery, Larry Fagin, Ted Berrigan, and Alice Notley. Wrenching the song out of vinyl and onto the pages of the Paris Review, Clark proved that "The Murder Mystery," given the right literary context and framing, could fit alongside the formally ambitious texts of Lou Reed's poetic contemporaries. Transforming the song lyrics into a static poem for the purposes of publication in a poetry magazine, Reed simply placed two columns on each page to replicate the stereo effect achieved on the album. Using the space of the page imaginatively and challenging the notion of "lyric" as bound to a single voice, Reed's "Murder Mystery" resonated with the poems of Berrigan, Fagin, and others, who similarly employed fragmented, poly-vocal, and resolutely experimental approaches to composing their texts.

Anne Waldman and Ted Berrigan – "Memorial Day"

Social links between musicians and poets throughout the East Village were formed casually. Apartment buzzers were pressed, visitors welcomed in to talk. According to the poet Lewis Warsh, for example, Lou Reed and fellow members of the Velvet Underground dropped in to his and Anne Waldman's apartment at 33 St. Mark's Place to listen to The Velvet Underground and Nico for the first time. The new sounds and words Reed and his contemporaries were composing found their way into the downtown poets' poems. This cross-fertilization of genres is revealed in Ted Berrigan and Anne Waldman's collaboratively written "Memorial Day": lines from the Velvet Underground's song "I'm Beginning to See the Light" are folded into the poem, whose form owes as much to Black Mountain poet Charles Olson's characterization of the manuscript page as a "field" as it does to the joyful noise of Lou Reed and friends.

Aram Saroyan – Crickets"

Back in the late 1960s, Richard Hell read and loved Aram Saroyan's poetry. Maybe that's because Saroyan's minimal poems from the 1960s – some composed of no more than one oddly-spelled word such as "blod," "lobstee" or ""lighght" – are hilarious blasts against poetic authority and seriousness as they urge readers to figure out a way to voice the poems. "I was trying to make a poem as immediate as a record," Aram Saroyan explained to Newsweek magazine in 1969, adding: "Literature will soon cease to exist, except as an art form. The alphabet won't exist either except as an antique." The poem, in Saroyan's hands, eschews the burdens of duration and attention attendant to tracking an unfolding lyric or narrative. One gets it in a flash. Crickets, crickets, crickets.

Anne Waldman – "Musical Garden"

A 1976 recording of "Musical Garden" included in Waldman and John Giorno's LP John Giorno & Anne Waldman: A Kulchur Selection finds Waldman acting equal parts rhapsodic Allen Ginsberg and rock star. Increasing tempo and pitch with each line, Waldman is practically stentorian as she approaches the finale of the poem: "Can't give you up, solar energy, speech, more sunlight & more speech & more speech & more energy more sunlight more emergency can't give you up yet can't give it up won't do it can't give you up won't do it won't do it can't give it up won't give it up won't give you up yet can't give it up no I can't give it up." At the poem's conclusion, a single voice from the audience is heard saying "Yeah" appreciatively, followed immediately by whoops and applause. A three-minute rock ‘n' roll poem!

Patti Smith - "Birdland"

Anne Waldman and Patti Smith remain friends to this day. As many of Smith's devoted fans know already, Waldman introduced Smith at her very first performance in 1971 at the Poetry Project in New York's East Village. Waldman's "Musical Garden," with its exhortation "can't give it up," was written and performed around the same time Patti Smith recorded her song "Birdland," complete with its own declamations "I won't give up," "I'm going up," and so on. The connections – social, poetic, performative – between Smith and Waldman in the mid-1970s are striking. Both women's work during this period actively blurred the lines between poetry, performance, and rock ‘n' roll.


Richard Hell – "Blank Generation"

Richard Hell assiduously read second-generation New York School poetry by Bernadette Mayer, Ted Berrigan, Ron Padgett, and their peers. These poets, whose home base was the Poetry Project at St. Mark's Church, published seemingly endless reams of collaborative, anonymous, or pseudonymous poetry that contested the idea of writing as self-expression and challenged conventional understandings of the author as stable, solitary subject. In light of this community-oriented literary culture, we should note that some of the phrases included in Hell's "Blank Generation" were published initially in Wanna Go Out?, a small-press poetry book written collaboratively with Tom Verlaine and published under the single pseudonym "Theresa Stern."


John Giono – "Pornographic Poem"

By the late 1960s John Giorno had made a name for himself by staging multimedia drug-fueled poetry readings and by setting up "Dial-a-Poem," a phone-service which users dialed in to hear anything from a Black Panther speech to a John Cage poem. Giorno was committed to challenging anything and anyone he deemed effete or overly "poetic." Released from the sophisticated and urbane chains held by first-generation New York School writers into the stink and noise of the downtown rock scene he so loved, Giorno positioned himself as a punk pied piper leading the formerly obedient second-generation New York School poets toward a wildly electric, outrageous future. By the mid-1980s, Giorno was fronting his own new wave band in clubs including CBGB. "[What's] turned out to be the best audience" for poetry, Giorno told an interviewer, "is the audience of, like rock 'n' roll clubs or new wave clubs or punk clubs or whatever you want to call them. An audience that's drunk and stoned and goes to a rock 'n' roll club or whatever, is very receptive to you, if you perform well."

Eileen Myles – reading on "Public Access Poetry," 1977

For Eileen Myles, pairing poetry and punk rock made intuitive sense. Recounting a poetry reading group in Boston that she attended in 1974 before she moved to New York, Myles describes a participant "dressed in all black with a medallion [who] said in this kind of ponderous way that her work was influenced by the New York rock poet Patti Smith. And I just—those words seen next to each other, I'd never heard of that but it sounded so perfect." Myles's first New York reading was in 1974 – at CBGB. According to Myles, CBGB "was a very funky place at the time…it was still kind of… it was a biker bar! There were big dogs walking around, and they had a reading scheduled before the band…The bands would go on late, the readings would go on earlier…my first feature was at CBGB." This reading features Myles in all her punky, playful, aggressive, and always charming glory. The writer and poet Alice Notley, who ran a poetry workshop at the Poetry Project that Myles attended, follows Myles with her own indelible reading.

Jim Carroll – "People Who Died"

Making it onto Billboard's Top 100 list in 1980, the Jim Carroll Band's hit single "People Who Died" had—and continues to have—multiple lives. The fifth track on the Jim Carroll Band's first album, Catholic Boy, "People Who Died" is heard, for example, in films as various as Steven Spielberg's ET: The Extra Terrestrial (1982), Fritz Kierch's Tuff Turf (1985), Zack Snyder's remake of George Romero's Dawn of the Dead (2004), and the filmic adaptation of Jim Carroll's The Basketball Diairies starring Leonardo DiCaprio (1995). Yet despite the way Carroll's "People Who Died" has resonated across the decades, few critics bother to mention that Carroll's song is inspired directly by Ted Berrigan's poem "People Who Died," first published in 1969. Carroll's stripped-down version of Berrigan's already stripped-down elegy was an attempt to free elegy from the burden of literariness by taking Berrigan's poem and translating it into punk rock. With Carroll's "People Who Died," the implications of Berrigan's populist poetics of sociability found a new, intoxicating form that played out on the radio, on TV, and on the streets. The New York School poem became the song the million punk kids sang together. This performance finds Carroll performing the song with Lou Reed, formerly of the Velvet Underground, and Robert Quine, formerly in Richard Hell and the Voidoids.


Daniel Kane and "Do You Have a Band?": Poetry and Punk Rock in New York City links:

excerpt from the book

The Arts Fuse review

Vanishing New York interview with the author
Los Angeles Review of Books interview with the author
PBS Newshour profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - September 28, 2017

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Anti-Gone

Anti-Gone
by Connor Willumsen

Montreal-based artist Connor Willumsen is “like Joyce with a joystick” in his latest comic book Anti-Gone, with striking dialogue and a complex narrative flitting between a virtual present and a dystopian future.


Brother

Brother
by David Chariandy

Recently longlisted for the Giller Prize, David Chariandy’s sophomore novel Brother is a precisely-wrought, achingly affecting account of the bond between brothers, and how they cope with the violence that surrounds them.


From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea

From the Stars in the Sky to the Fish in the Sea
by Kai Cheng Thom, Wai-Yant Li, Kai Yun Ching

The transcendental power of a mother’s love helps a shape-shifting and gender-variant child to change the world around them.


Cheer Up, Jay Ritchie

Cheer Up, Jay Ritchie
by Jay Ritchie

Editor at Montreal publisher Metatron, Jay Ritchie is an integral figure in the city’s literary scene. His first full collection of poetry is clever, concise, and stares down life’s gullet with “an alternating sense of wonder and detachment”.


My Ariel

My Ariel
by Sina Queyras

The latest release from Concordia University professor and prolific poet Sina Queyras is her personal take on Sylvia Plath’s iconic text.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Jennifer Egan on Books and Reading, Stream the New Wolf Parade Album, and more)

Jennifer Egan talked books and reading with the New York Times.


NPR Music is streaming the new Wolf Parade album Cry Cry Cry.


The Advocate recommended new books about LGBT families.


Stream a collaborative track from Radiohead and composer Hans Zimmer.


Aline Brosh McKenna talked to Publishers Weekly about her graphic novel Jane, which places Jane Eyre in modern Brooklyn.


NPR Music is streaming The Weather Station's self-titled album.


Andrew Sean Greer discussed his latest novel Less with Bookworm.


SPIN reconsidered Steely Dan's Aja album 40 years after its release.


The DSC Prize for South Asian Literature 2017 shortlist has been announced.


NPR Music is streaming Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith's new album, The Kid.


Signature shared a primer to the works of author James McBride.


The New York Times profiled singer-songwriter Daniel Johnston.


Sarah Perry discussed her memoir After the Eclipse with Literary Hub.


NPR Music is streaming Becca Mancari's new album, Good Woman.


The New York Times examined what challenged books have in common.


Noisey offered a primer to the music of Wilco.


Anne Korkeakivi shared her reading habits at Literary Hub.


Stream a new Forest Swords song.


Celeste Ng shared her love for Goodnight Moon at the Atlantic.


Aesop Rock talked scoring film with PopMatters.


Signature recommended Nordic noir books.


Stream a new Ezra Furman song.


Read a newly discovered Kurt Vonnegut story.


1A interviewed singer-songwriter and author Josh Ritter.


The Barnes and Noble Review interviewed poet Nicole Sealey.


Stream a new song by The Patient (Apples In Stereo's Robert Schneider and the Olivia Tremor Control's Will Cullen Hart).


Signature recommended recently published music books.


Tori Amos discussed the inspirations behind her new album Native Invader with Rolling Stone.


Stream a new Deradoorian song.



eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Bagombo Snuff Box by Kurt Vonnegut
The Constant Gardener by John le Carre
Deadeye Dick by Kurt Vonnegut
Devotion by Dani Shapiro
Georgia O'Keefe by Roxana Robinson
The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle
The Last Gentleman by Walker Percy
Lean on Pete by Willy Vlautin
Loner by Teddy Wayne
My Name Is Leon by Kit de Waal
North Haven by Sarah Moriarty
Palm Sunday by Kurt Vonnegut
Stones from the River by Ursula Hegi
The Temple of Gold by William Goldman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Girl waits with Gun by Amy Stewart
The Narrow Door by Paul Lisicky
Native Believer by Ali Eteraz

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

All About Lulu by Jonathan Evison
Goddess of Buttercups & Daisies by Martin Millar
Memoirs of a Porcupine by Alain Mabanckou
My Happy Life by Lydia Millet
The Palace of Illusions by Kim Addonizio
They Live by Jonathan Lethem



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

September 27, 2017

Book Notes - Chantel Acevedo "The Living Infinite"

The Living Infinite

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Chantel Acevedo's novel The Living Infinite is a masterfully told work of historical fiction.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"A wonderfully compact saga . . . Fresh, fast-moving historical fiction from a master storyteller"


In her own words, here is Chantel Acevedo's Book Notes music playlist for her novel The Living Infinite:



The initial seed of inspiration for The Living Infinite was sown at a dinner party. The host told the story of the Infanta Eulalia, the late 19th century Bourbon princess, who visited Cuba at the height of the country's War of Independence. In the story, Eulalia's ship docks in Havana's harbor. She steps onto the deck, and gasp! She's wearing red, white, and blue, the colors of the rebel flag.

It's a great story, and one that is only partly true. Her dress was blue and white (perhaps she had a red hankie, who knows?). But the Cubans in Havana fell in love with her, this young, beautiful and audacious princess who had secretly met with Cuban rebels in Madrid and was pro-independence. As the kids say, the crown sent the wrong one to Cuba.

As a Cuban-American, I was surprised that I had never heard of this Eulalia. I left that dinner and spent the next year researching the Spanish infanta who would become the center of my attention.

While these weren't songs I listened to while writing, they certainly remind me of Eulalia Bourbon, Infanta of Spain, early feminist, and bold as brass.

Hold Up—Beyoncé

Eulalia, like her mother and grandmother before her, was stuck in an arranged and loveless marriage. To make matters worse, Eulalia's husband, the Infante Antonio, her first cousin, had a very public affair with an actress. He gave his mistress jewels and land, and people began to call her "La Infantona," which must have felt to Eulalia as if they were all rubbing it in her face. Which brings me to Beyoncé. Had Eulalia had a bat, she might have taken out Antonio's car windows, too. "Hold Up" is the perfect song for Eulalia and Antonio's relationship.

Future Love—Lady Gaga

Lady Gaga never recorded this song in a studio, but there's a lovely live version that I'm obsessed with. In it, Gaga sings about her "future boy," a man who makes her "mascara run in constellations." Eulalia likely had lovers of her own, but in The Living Infinite, I've imagined one for her—her milk brother, Tomás Aragón. Tomás is bookseller who is obsessed with Jules Verne and the possibilities of the future. His outlook helps Eulalia see that there are possibilities for her that she might not have imagined.

Hoy—Gloria Estefan

This is my favorite Gloria Estefan song. And yes, as a Miamian and a Cuban-American, having a favorite Gloria song is part of the package. It's a song at turns melancholy, then hopeful, about lovers separated from one another. "Tengo marcado en el pecho todos los dias que el tiempo no me dejó estar aquí" she sings, blaming time for the long separation. The song reminds me of so many Cuban exiles, who miss their home but do not return, for many reasons. It reminds me of families ripped in two, of lovers separated by the wake of history. It could be Eulalia's story, and Tomas', too.

Just a Girl—No Doubt

This selection is further proof that I was in college in the 90's. I blasted this song while driving my Ford Escort to campus and back every day. This is Gwen Stefani in her pre-Blake Shelton days, when she wore white tanks and chain belts, and sarcastically sang about being a girl, "all pretty and petite, so don't let me have any rights." Gwen had her lyrics, Eulalia had her own writing. In The Thread of Life, Eulalia's first book, she writes about divorce and feminism, women in the workplace, and freedom of the press. For that, she was exiled from Spain by her nephew, the king. The Living Infinite imagines a book that is a precursor to Thread, picturing what she would have been bold enough to say at the cusp of her thirtieth birthday.

Talula—Tori Amos

As with most Tori Amos songs, deciphering the meaning of the lyrics here is like trying to count stars. But "Talula" has references to Anne Boleyn and the line "Say goodbye my baby to the Old World," which fits just right here. In the novel, Eulalia and Tomás make their way to the Columbian Exposition of 1893 in Chicago. There they see all the wonders that the 20th century will hold. In ways both explicit and metaphoric, they say goodbye to the Old World of Europe, and hello to the new.

Mignon Overture—Ambroise Thomas

This is the only song that's actually in the novel. In Havana, Tomás and Eulalia long to dance at a gathering in the princess' honor, but decorum keeps them from it. The song is from the comedic opera, Mignon, written in 1866. Later, a danzón comes on, which leads me to my last song…

Como Fue—Beny Moré

This is one of my favorite songs, and Beny Moré, the maestro of Cuban danzón, hits his pinnacle with "Como fue." It is a song full of longing, Moré's voice quivering with emotion throughout. He describes his love like a light that illuminates all of his being. This was the kind of love that the historical Eulalia, as well as all the women in her family, were denied.


Chantel Acevedo and The Living Infinite links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Booklist review
Kirkus review
Library Journal review

The Leonard Lopate show interview with the author
Shelf Awareness interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - David Friend "The Naughty Nineties"

The Naughty Nineties

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

David Friend's The Naughty Nineties is an impressive cultural history of the American '90s as seen through the lens of sex.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"A witty, comprehensively researched time capsule from an unforgettable age of excess, scandal, and sex."


In his own words, here is David Friend's Book Notes music playlist for his book The Naughty Nineties:



As I wrote The Naughty Nineties: The Triumph of the American Libido—a cultural, political, and sexual history of the Clinton years—I often relied on that decade’s audio track. Admittedly, I was informed by ’90s films (Thelma & Louise, Pulp Fiction, Boys N the Hood, The Big Lebowski, American Beauty), television (Seinfeld, Sex and the City, South Park), and books (Backlash, Iron John, and, yes, The Starr Report). Digital breakthroughs and platforms that emerged back then (The World Wide Web, AOL, The Drudge Report) were also close at hand. But I couldn’t have written the book without drawing from music’s memory bank.

Admittedly, there were a raft of songs in the 1990s that dripped with Eros, from Salt-N-Pepa’s “Let’s Talk About Sex” to Missy Elliott’s “Sock It 2 Me,” from Marcy Playground’s “Sex and Candy,” to Kid Rock’s “Cowboy,” to the Red Hot Chili Pepper’s “Blood Sugar Sex Magik.” (Bizarro real-world factoid: Flea’s father drove our children’s school bus in suburban New Rochelle, New York.) Some songs of that period, in fact, are too steamy for this playlist. (Let’s rule out Li’l Kim’s “No Time” and 2 Live Crew’s “Pop That Coochie,” shall we?) And yet while I was writing the book, this was the ’90s soundtrack that helped shape the narrative on the page.

“Smells Like Teen Spirit” by Nirvana’s Kurt Cobain, Krist Novoselic, and Dave Grohl, 1991

“A mosquito/My libido…” No single track better captures the turbulent soul of America’s alienated youth in the 1990s than Nirvana’s unsettling anthem from Nevermind. With acidic irony, Cobain’s EveryGuy declares: “Here we are now, entertain us,” suggesting that the Great Unwashed had become a vast class of voyeurs—watchers, not doers. In terms of young male alienation and chronic self-doubt, three other ‘90s songs ranked up there: Nirvana’s “Lithium,” from 1991 (“I’m so ugly, but that’s okay, ’cause so are you”), Radiohead’s “Creep” from 1992 (“I’m a creep/I’m a weirdo”) and “Self Esteem,” from 1994, by Dexter Holland and The Offspring (“Now I know I’m being used/That’s okay, man, ’cause I like the abuse.”)

“Rebel Girl,” Bikini Kill’s Kathleen Hanna, Billy Karren, Tobi Vail, and Kathi Wilcox, first performed 1991, released 1993

Bikini Kill and other punk-infused bands jump-started the riot grrrl movement and added vitality, virality, and urgency to what became known as Third Wave Feminism. “For a while,” writer and musician Sara Marcus recalls in her study of the riot grrrl scene, Girls to the Front, “no other music mattered [to me,] just that breastbone-shaking bass line and Kathleen Hanna’s voice singing with all the concentrated fury of a firehouse, ‘Dare you do what you want! Dare you be who you will!’” The song “Rebel Girl” distills that fury to its aural essence.

“Remember the Time” by Michael Jackson, 1991

For me, this track about nostalgia and lost romance has its own nostalgic force field. On assignment for Life magazine in the 1990s—before all the child-abuse cases were filed against Michael Jackson—photographer Harry Benson and I were the first print journalists allowed to profile him at his private California compound, Neverland Ranch—a Man-Child’s paradise with a petting zoo, steam-engine train, lush gardens, and a full-scale amusement park. At one point, I took a spin on one of the rides: a swinging, gravity-defying pirate ship gondola ride. And the surrounding loudspeakers were blasting out “Remember the Time,” as if to underscore the fact that that very moment was a fleeting instant of pure joy that, despite its childish glee, would somehow resonate well into my golden years.

“Baby Got Back,” Anthony Ray (Sir Mix-a-Lot), 1992

As I write in The Naughty Nineties: “Sir Mix-a-Lot had the nation’s No. 1 hit, distinguished by its propulsive beat and cheeky lyrics, ‘I like big butts and I cannot lie.’ Mix was branded a misogynist and a racist and a liberator. MTV, alarmed, would only air the song’s video in nocturnal rotation. But America was hooked. The track would become, in the view of Vulture.com’s Rob Kemp, ‘our national anthem of ass.’ Or as the A&R-man-producer-journalist Dan Charnas would say, ‘Mix was ‘the loudest voice for the cultural overthrow of the Euro-centric beauty aesthetic.’” Mix’s motivation? He was angry that women of color were being shortchanged—exemplified by ‘heroin-chic’ fashion shoots—as the arbiters of commerce, culture, and style seemed to be foisting lanky or waiflike women onto an increasingly diverse and dissatisfied consumer.

“F*ck and Run” by Liz Phair, 1993

“I can feel it in my bones/I’m gonna spend another year alone.” Phair’s Exile in Guyville album augured the emotional Ice Age that was beginning to calcify the mating game, stunting young people who were just aching for genuine connection. Her song “F*ck and Run” was released in 1993—the same year as the first Web browser—just as the culture was confronting chatrooms, “hooking up,” and Take Back the Night marches against date rape. How could a gal, trapped in Guyville, she asked, find “letters and sodas”—simple tried-and-true, heart-to-heart expressions of romance—when relationships seemed so freaking transactional and when sexual encounters, or violations, were so casual and cold, sometimes occurring woefully early in life (“Even when I was 12”)?

“Closer,” by Trent Reznor and Nine Inch Nails, 1994

This passage from the book says it all: “I am napping in my tent when I hear a howl. I can make out the words distinctly, ‘I want to f*ck you like an AN-I-MAL!’… Though muddled by dream and hangover, I awaken as the howl persists. I’m at Woodstock ’94 in Saugerties, New York, a three-day, mud-spattered gathering to mark the 25th anniversary (Boomer alert!) of the original Woodstock festival—the counterculture’s crowning hour. The lead singer is screeching now. The electronic hiss is unnerving. The lyrics too. ‘It’s Trent Reznor,’ says my companion…. Reznor seems to be asserting that sex on the primal level—hot monkey love—reinforces what we all are at root: animals in a single jungle. And perhaps it is our shared carnality that connects all living creatures, reinforcing our deeper, spiritual bonds. In looking back on that moment, I concede: rock has always been about sex, as jazz before it. But in Reznor’s splintering cry, rock had become sex.”

“Wannabe” by The Spice Girls with Matt Rowe and Richard Stannard, 1996

Madonna was the ’80s-and-’90s empowerment icon most responsible for busting gender norms, recalibrating women’s personal style, navigating the dynamics of sex and social interaction, insisting that individual women adopt true self-reliance and self-definition and, at the same time, disregard taboos to explore and express their sexual selves. But she is more identified with the ’80s. And I never really dug her music (or her voice) unless I was on the dancefloor and buzzed out of my gourd. For young girls in the ’90s, the more mainstream pop messengers of female empowerment—and for the cohesive force of sisterhood—were The Spice Girls, whose hit “Wannabee” counseled, “If you wanna be my lover/You gotta get with my friends.”

“Crocodile Man” by Dave Carter (Chris Smither's version), 1999

When singer-songwriter Dave Carter passed away in 2002, shock and gloom enveloped his family, friends, and fans. His album Tanglewood Tree, recorded in November of 1999, can still move me to tears. And one haunting, jarring track, “Crocodile Man,” sends chills down the spine. It captures the squirrelly soul of a sly, morally suspect trickster whose “mama knows exactly where her bad boy [had] been.” To my mind, Chris Smither's foot-tapping, trance-inducing take on Carter’s classic (from Smither's 2003 album Train Home) is the consummate rendition.

“Anything Goes” by Cole Porter, 1934

Just to put The Naughty Nineties in perspective, this classic from between the wars reminds us that at various stages in the culture (the 1890s, the 1920s and ’30s, the swinging ’60s and ’70s), songwriters have always found inspiration in how their libertine peers tested sexual limits. Writes Cole Porter: “Good authors too who once knew better words/Now only use four-letter words/Writing prose/Anything goes.”

And what are the alpha and omega tunes that, hands down, will immediately put you in the 1990s mood? Alpha: the Twin Peaks theme song, composed by Angelo Badalamenti, who won the 1990 Grammy for his instrumental milestone—a mesmerizing theme that echoes Twin Peaks creator David Lynch’s larger message: deep in the bedrock of every American city or town course forces more strange and dark than you can possibly imagine. Omega? The 1998 song that I would play most frequently to get jacked up about the book, the world, and this grand interlude called life: New Radicals’ “You Get What You Give.”


David Friend and The Naughty Nineties links:

the book's website
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book

Globe and Mail review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review
TIME review

Chicago Magazine interview with the author
The Leonard Lopate Show interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (The Literary Lives of Animals, Elastica's Debut Album Reevaluated, and more)

Tobias Carroll examined literary depictions of animals at Electric Literature.


Pitchfork reconsidered Elastica's self-titled debut album.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn interviewed author duncan b. barlow.


Stream a new Wild Beast song.


Robin Sloan discussed his new novel Sourdough with the Barnes and Noble Review.


Stream a new Karl Blau song.


Help fund a critical study of Robert Heinein's writing.


Stream an unreleased 2002 demo by Yeah Yeah Yeahs.


Sophfronia Scott discussed her novel Unforgivable Love with Weekend Edition.


No Recess! interviewed Unwound drummer Sara Lund.


The Z Review interviewed cartoonist Peter Bagge.


Stream a new Sincere Engineer song.


Holly Goddard Jones discussed her novel The Salt Line with Paste.


The New Yorker examined the history of Devo's "Satisfaction" cover.


The Washington Post recommended September's best poetry collections.


The National covered the Talking Heads' "Heaven."


Alternet shared an excerpt from Jessica Bruder's book Nomadland.


Time Out New York profiled the reunited band Rainer Maria.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Jenny Zhang.


Stream a new song by Parquet Courts’ A. Savage.


NOW recommended fall's must-read books.


Debbie Harry on moving to the East Village in 1965.


The New York Times interviewed literary critic Parul Sehgal.


Stream a new Radiator Hospital song.


Zack McDermott discussed his new memoir Gorilla and the Bird with Rolling Stone.


Grimes shared a playlist of songs she loves.


James McBride discussed his new book Five-Carat Soul with the Washington Post.


Stream a new song by Kurt Vile and Courtney Barnett.


Literary Hub interviewed poet Danez Smith.


The Quietus interviewed Meemo Comma's Lara Rix-Martin.


Entropy featured a discussion between poets Krystal Languell and Gina Myers.


Pitchfork shared an excerpt from Jenn Pelly’s new 33 1/3 book on The Raincoats' self-titled album.



eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Bagombo Snuff Box by Kurt Vonnegut
The Constant Gardener by John le Carre
Deadeye Dick by Kurt Vonnegut
Devotion by Dani Shapiro
Georgia O'Keefe by Roxana Robinson
The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle
The Last Gentleman by Walker Percy
Lean on Pete by Willy Vlautin
Loner by Teddy Wayne
My Name Is Leon by Kit de Waal
North Haven by Sarah Moriarty
Palm Sunday by Kurt Vonnegut
Stones from the River by Ursula Hegi
The Temple of Gold by William Goldman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Girl waits with Gun by Amy Stewart
The Narrow Door by Paul Lisicky
Native Believer by Ali Eteraz

eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

All About Lulu by Jonathan Evison
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Memoirs of a Porcupine by Alain Mabanckou
My Happy Life by Lydia Millet
The Palace of Illusions by Kim Addonizio
They Live by Jonathan Lethem



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

September 26, 2017

Book Notes - Stephen King and Owen King "Sleeping Beauties"

Sleeping Beauties

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Stephen King and Owen King's novel Sleeping Beauties offers a compelling and timely exploration of gender stereotypes.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Another horror blockbuster, Mercedes and all, from maestro King and his heir apparent…In a kind of untold Greek tragedy meets Deliverance meets—well, bits of Mr. Mercedes and The Shawshank Redemption, perhaps—King and King, father and son, take their time putting all the pieces into play: brutish men, resourceful women who've had quite enough, alcohol, and always a subtle sociological subtext, in this case of rural poverty and dreams sure to be dashed…A blood-splattered pleasure."


In their own words, here is Stephen King and Owen King's Book Notes music playlist for their novel Sleeping Beauties:



To know:

• Because vinyl is back – never left, baby! – we decided to construct our imaginary Sleeping Beauties soundtrack as a 12 song LP.
Sleeping Beauties is, broadly, about an epidemic that causes women to not awaken from sleep. It’s set in and around a small Appalachian town named Dooling, and on the same day the epidemic begins, by no coincidence, a peculiar woman calling herself Eve Black, arrives on the scene. To say much more is to risk spoiling the fun, but in the liner notes below, we say fair a bit more, so you may want to save this for after you read the novel.

— Stephen King & Owen King


SIDE A

1."Born A Woman" - Sandy Posey
SK: Pop music, whether country or rock, is more about spirit than sense. In this song — lyrics from it are one of the Sleeping Beauties epigraphs — the spirit is one of toughness and resilience. There’s a clear-eyed appreciation of a society where women are “stepped on, lied to…and treated like dirt,” but there’s also a kind of defiant gladness, and a commitment to keep on trying.

2. "Auld Triangle" - Luke Kelly & the Dubliners
OK: We quote from “Auld Triangle” in the novel and while I might be imagining it, I seem to recall that Dad confessed to me that while he didn't really love the tune, thought it was a bit corny, he liked it for us, because it's gestured to ironically. The song's famous punchline, of course, is that the prisoner, miserable in lock-up, ultimately wishes he was jailed at "the female prison." Dr. Clinton Norcross, one of our four or five central characters, is living that "dream" in a way - as the psychiatrist in a women's prison - and thinks about the song.

3. "Endless Sleep" - Jody Reynolds
SK: Since our book is about sleeping women, this one, with its haunting refrain (Come join me, baby, in my endless sleep) seemed like a no-brainer. It’s a teen suicide song that gains sinister resonance by virtue of its simplicity.

4. "At Seventeen" - Janis Ian
SK: How much of female success in American society depends on beauty, personality, and the ability to show those pearly whites at the drop of a male witticism? Here’s a song that suggests quite a lot on the subject by showing the other side. This is what it’s like for the ugly ducklings, those “lacking in the social graces.” It’s about how those “small town eyes gaze at you in dull surprise.” Small towns like Dooling, for instance.

5. "Shake Some Action" - Flamin’ Groovies
OK: Offered in tribute to another doctor character, Garth Flickinger, MD, whose beloved Flamin' Groovies t-shirt doesn't survive the novel. Also, there’s some pretty good action in the book. (Or, at least, that’s what we tell ourselves.)

6. "You're Gonna Miss Me" - 13th Floor Elevators
OK: Arguably the quintessential track from the Nuggets box set. A real clatter. I’ve never been sure if it’s a howl of pain or a howl celebration of freedom, but it’s some kind of howl. The men in our novel end up missing the women quite a bit. And the women miss the men, too. But the women are better able to adapt. If you consider the everyday sexism of American life, and the degree to which women succeed in spite of it, this won’t be a surprise.

SIDE B

7. "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead" - Warren Zevon
OK: It don't matter if I get a little tired/I'll sleep when I'm dead. Sleep looks very close to death for the female characters in our novel. If they let themselves give in, there's just no telling if they'll ever get to wake up again. With that in mind, it would have been soundtrack malpractice not to include this Warren Zevon romp. (Aside: my close listening to Warren Zevon's discography leads me to believe that he didn't sleep through a single night in the entire decade of the seventies, and took, at most, four or five naps during that time.)

8. "Sisters Are Doing It For Themselves" - Eurythmics & Aretha Franklin
SK: There’s also joy in being a woman, an ability to do what men do (and better). This euphoric collaboration expresses it. I thought of it in connection with the brave women of Our Place in Sleeping Beauties as they try to build a new society from the ashes of the old.

9. "County Jail Special" - Champion Jack Dupree
SK: This is from the album Penitentiary Blues: Songs to Do Hard Time By, which makes it a natural for our purposes. Champion Jack — his nickname came from his boxing days — never did hard time, but the song perfectly articulates the boredom and “lowdown” quality of doing time. The best thing about this version is Champ’s nonchalant falsetto breaks and the barrelhouse piano.

10. "Oh, Babe, It Ain't No Lie" - Elizabeth Cotten
OK: One old woman, Lord, in this town/keeps telling her lies on me. This song makes me think of Evie, who appears to be young, but has – well, let’s say, an old soul. She’s also not the most honest person. There’s a wonderfully charming YouTube clip of Elizabeth Cotten explaining how she wrote it about a neighbor that lied about her when was a child that I recommend you seek out. Besides Cotten’s stellar original, there have also been some great cover versions of this song, starting with the Grateful Dead’s well-known take.

11. "The Body Electric" - Hurray for the Riffraff
OK: Sleeping Beauties is a fantasy, but it’s informed by the world we live in, and especially the country we live in, and our country’s a fucking mess. Alynda Segarra gets to the heart of it.

12. "You Better Be Good To Me" - Tina Turner
SK: Here is the ultimate, do-not-cross-this-line demand, as expressed by a woman who lived the hard life Sandy Posey’s song is about. Tina shouts it with the conviction of a streetcorner preacher: Yes, she says, I’m a prisoner of your love, entangled in your web…but pay attention, Mr. Man: "You better be good to me, that’s how it’s gotta be.” Testify, woman. Tell it.


Stephen King and Owen King and Sleeping Beauties links:

Owen King's website
Stephen King's website
the book's Wikipedia entry
excerpt from the book

Guardian review
Kirkus review
Publishers Weekly review
St. Louis Post-Dispatch review

Entertainment Weekly profile of the authors
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by Owen King for Double Feature
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by Owen King for We're All in This Together
Vulture interview with Stephen King


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Alice Anderson "Some Bright Morning, I'll Fly Away"

Some Bright Morning, I'll Fly Away

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Alice Anderson's Some Bright Morning, I'll Fly Away is one of the most moving memoirs I have ever read.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Anderson is a gifted writer who vividly describes both settings and emotions. Her powerful story gives voice and hope to women caught in similarly terrible conditions.""


In her own words, here is Alice Anderson's Book Notes music playlist for her memoir Some Bright Morning, I'll Fly Away:



Three Little Birds
Bob Marley & The Wailers

This is the song I made a lullaby I made for my sweet three—Avery, Grayson, and Aidan. It was the song I'd sing at bedtime, the song I'd sing in an airport to calm then down when we were all traveling and everyone was tired to the bone. The night I was attacked, with the sweet three looking on, ended with my abuser locking himself in our bedroom with the kids, telling me there'd be no kids left if I called the police. Luckily, I called a DV shelter instead, and they advised me. The next morning, he woke up early and I did too, making his coffee like I always did, and he left three crisp one hundred dollar bills on the counter when he left, suggesting I buy each kid a new bike. Talk about "honeymoon phase." Only I took the money and ran. And the next night, huddled together on one bunk in the same shelter I'd called in a panic the night before, I sang this song to my shell-shocked children. That is, until someone down the hall yell, "Shut up, stupid!" and that was the end of that!


Sign Your Name Across My Heart
Terrence Trent D'Arby (Sandanda Maitreya)

It didn't make it into the book, but when I moved into the "Maxi Pad" in Paris, where a half dozen other models were already bunked out, D'Arby was briefly staying with us, dating one of the girls. I did just about everything in Paris except model. Save some shoots and shows I walked in, my days there were spent eating peaches, reading books, writing poems on brown paper bags, exploring the night city. I've always loved this song, and I'm a sucker for anyone who calls me baby.


You Don't Own Me
Son Lux
Stranger Forms

"I feel you tracing my scars—you don't own me."

I love the darkness of this track. This line, in particular, always strikes me in the heart. Because many times in toxic, abusive relationships, there is a kind of bonding over the ugliness. That moment before the moment you enter that honeymoon phase? When the abuser gets to fawn all over your tender, hurt parts (emotional, spiritual, or physical) and make it all better? But that's part of taking back your narrative, of taking agency of your own wounds. Because, as I say in Some Bright Morning, I'll Fly Away's first line: "We make chapels of our scars." And they are our own, not the abuser's. The story moves from telling an abuse story to telling a survival story. From telling a story of being wounded, to leaping out of that wound.


Keep Breathing
Ingrid Michaelson

First, I'm a Grey's Anatomy addict—it's my escape of choice, and this song appears in some of my favorite episodes. There is nothing like a Netflix binge when life seems unbearable.

"All I know is I'm breathing/all I can do is keep breathing/all we can do is keep breathing." Some Bright Morning is about survival. A lot of time people think of survival in a finite, "you made it" way. But survival can be soul achingly slow. When you leave an abuser, it's not over the day you leave. The leaving is metered out—over years, over battles, over court dates—and you have to keep fighting. Likewise, I am eight years out from sustaining a traumatic brain injury, and recovery from TBI is measured out not in days or weeks or months, but years. In both cases, my children were along for the ride. It's terrible to never get relief, to feel that the surviving isn't ever over. So sometimes all you can do is keep breathing, until you arrive at that finally, when the rough days are over at last.


The Greatest
Cat Power

I love Chan Marshall's kitten growl. This is one of those songs, and one of those albums, that I played over and over again. I was in catastrophe and court battles for the better part of ten years, and this song was a saving grace. As anyone who has been through the family court system or as a "victim" in the criminal courts knows, it can feel endless, like your fate is out of your hands and handed over to a power outside of yourself. It can rob you of agency, strip you of dignity, cloak you in fear. It's a ringer—spiritual, emotional, physical—if there ever was one. So when Chan sings,

Once I wanted to be the greatest
No wind or waterfall could stall me
And then came the rush of the flood
Stars at night turned deep to dust

Melt me down
Into big black armor
Leave no trace of grace…

Secure the grounds
For the later parade

it feels like I can power through, and arrive at the later parade of safety, of freedom, of peace.


How Many Fucks?
Erika Jayne

Well first, zero fucks given. I think the best survival stories are the ones that have a healthy dose of badass in the redemptive narrative. That's where the humor and the fearlessness and power come in. Also, we are a big drag family. My daughter Avery, aka PLEATHER, is a drag artist. She's the drag daughter in the local drag scene. There is a thematic pull through of drag as subversion in Some Bright Morning—they way we put on a persona to obtain power. So we play a lot of artists that are beloved in the drag scene. When this one came out, it was a personal power ballad: sunroof open, red lips on, driving down the highway, car dancing, no fucks given. Especially in the world of family court, where you have to relentlessly behave "like a lady" if you hope to keep your children, it's nice to have this kind of track in your back pocket. "How many fucks do I give? None, not one, zero, zero, done."


I'll Fly Away
Gillian Welch, Allison Krauss
O Brother, Where Art Thou Soundtrack

Of course I had to include this song. It's my anthem. The title of the book came from a scene, shortly after Katrina, when we're in New Orleans for the weekend to escape the hell that was still South Mississippi (where Katrina made direct landfall.) We'd often go to the Quarter to feel like life was at least normal: where restaurants and stores were open, where we could get away from the devastation that was our town, Ocean Springs. In the Quarter there is this street band that is always playing Jackson Square. On this day, it was just a ragtag ghost of the former band. I was on the street with my kids—one a baby, one a toddler, and one about five years old. When they started playing, "I'll Fly Away" I started singing, and somehow they invited me up. After that, whenever they'd see me coming, they cut off whatever song they were playing and start in with "I'll Fly Away." I was trapped—in a marriage, in a place, in a life I wanted out of. All I wanted was freedom, and "I'll Fly Away" became my freedom ballad.


Alice Anderson and Some Bright Morning, I'll Fly Away links:

excerpt from the book

Booklist review
Fiction Advocate review

Electric Literature interview with the author
The Manifest-Station interview with the author
Rumpus interview with the author
Sacramento News and Review profile of the author
Salon interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Margaret Atwood on the Inspiration Behind Alias Grace, A New Song from Michael Cera & Sharon Van Etten, and more)

Margaret Atwood on what inspired her historical novel Alias Grace.


Stream a new song by Michael Cera and Sharon Van Etten.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed the National Book Foundation's Lisa Lucas.


The Boston Globe profiled Patti Smith.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn shared an excerpt from Margo Berdeshevsky’s new book, Before the Drought.


Stream a new Ty Segall song.


Bookforum interviewed author Jenny Erpenbeck.


PopMatters profiled singer-songwriter Linda Perhacs.


The 2017 National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honorees have been announced.


Marika Hackman played an AVC Session.


Bustle recommended true crime books published in the last decade.


Stream a new song by The Residents.


Vulture profiled Stephen King.


Rolling Stone previewed fall's new music.


All Things Considered about her book Nomadland.


Frankie Rose covered the Cure's "A Forest."


Alice Anderson discussed her memoir Some Bright Morning, I’ll Fly Away with Salon.


Stereogum is streaming Florist's new album If Blue Could Be Happiness.


The Dallas Morning News interviewed Michael Chabon.


NYCTaper shared a recent Cap'n Jazz performance.


The Creative Independent interviewed author Eileen Myles.


Aquarium Drunkard interviewed The Weather Station's Tamara Lindeman and shared a new song by her.


Book Riot recommended September's best fiction and poetry in translation.


Stream a new Belle and Sebastian song.


Literary Hub shared a Meghan O'Rourke poem from her new collection Sun in Days.


The Quietus shared an excerpt from Paul Rekret's new book, Down with Childhood: Pop Music and the Crisis of Innocence.


The Millions interviewed author Carmen Maria Machado.


The National covered New Order's "Love Vigilantes."


The Millions interviewed author Eleanor Henderson.



eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

Bagombo Snuff Box by Kurt Vonnegut
The Constant Gardener by John le Carre
Deadeye Dick by Kurt Vonnegut
Devotion by Dani Shapiro
Georgia O'Keefe by Roxana Robinson
The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle
The Last Gentleman by Walker Percy
Lean on Pete by Willy Vlautin
Loner by Teddy Wayne
My Name Is Leon by Kit de Waal
North Haven by Sarah Moriarty
Palm Sunday by Kurt Vonnegut
Stones from the River by Ursula Hegi
The Temple of Gold by William Goldman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

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eBooks on sale for $3.99 today:

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The Palace of Illusions by Kim Addonizio
They Live by Jonathan Lethem



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

September 25, 2017

Book Notes - Pat Thomas "Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary"

Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Pat Thomas's Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary is a captivating portrait of both the activist and the era.

Kirkus wrote of the book:

"An eye-opener for those who remember the '60s; for everyone else, a welcome introduction to that tumultuous time as illustrated through one of its most memorable personalities."


In his own words, here is Pat Thomas's Book Notes music playlist for his book Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary:



As I compile this playlist, it's the 49th Anniversary of the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention Riots; co-led by the subject of my new book: Jerry Rubin of the Yippies.

It was pure coincidence yet simply part of the synergy of the 1960s, that during the week of late August riots on the streets of Chicago, the Beatles released "Revolution" as a single (at the beginning of that tumultuous week) and the Rolling Stones released "Street Fighting Man" as a '45 as the protests wound down 5 days later. Talk about iconic bookends!

While just shouting out the slogan "Yippie!" was part of the soundtrack of the era, Jerry Rubin was closely aligned with many of the musicians of the day – protest singer Phil Ochs become a friend early on – while an unknown Rubin was still marching across the UC Berkeley campus in 1965. Ed Sanders, co-leader of the infamous Fugs was part of the Yippie conclave when they started up in '67. Rubin encountered Bob Dylan in '65 and again in '72 trying to rope the legendary bard into street-level political activism without success – and most infamously, it was Rubin who introduced the band Elephant's Memory to John & Yoko which resulted in the Lennon's double album of protest songs Some Time In New York City – in which Rubin is mentioned twice in various song lyrics and was responsible for some of the subject matter – such as the song "John Sinclair" about the manager of the MC5.

All of this is covered in detail in my new book DID iT! Jerry Rubin: An American Revolutionary – in which I interviewed 75 people who had a front row seat to these meetings and events that I mention above.

The Fugs - Exorcising The Evil Spirits From The Pentagon October 21, 1967

As part of the 'exorcism,' members of The Fugs, Norman Mailer, Allen Ginsberg, and thousands of other freaks chanted "Out, demons, out." The image of Che Guevara, who had been murdered a few weeks prior, was flying in the breeze along with flags of the Viet Cong. Phil Ochs performed on a makeshift stage, and satanic filmmaker Kenneth Anger growled incantations underneath the platform. The cool October air carried the patchouli scent of the Summer of Love (which had peaked just months earlier in Haight-Ashbury), All the elements, when combined with symbolic images of global revolution – resulted in "ritual theater" as described in Norman Mailer's The Armies of the Night.

Allen Ginsberg - Going to San Diego
Bob Dylan – George Jackson

By autumn 1971, Bob Dylan had come under heat from the radical left because he hadn't recorded any political songs in years. They wanted something along the lines of "The Death Of Emmett Till" rather than "Like a Rolling Stone" or "If Not For You."

Dylan had returned to the Village after sitting out the last part of the Sixties in Woodstock. He was now wandering the streets of Manhattan, trying to avoid interactions with provocateur A.J. Weberman, who was intent on stalking Dylan by pawing thru his garbage and accusing him of nefarious deeds in the underground press. To this day, Weberman continues to hound Dylan - posting harangues against him on YouTube.

Dylan ultimately decided to collaborate with Allen Ginsberg on some political recordings. On November 17th, 1971, with lyricist Ginsberg as the primary vocalist, backed by Dylan on guitar (along with musicians like David Amram, Happy Traum and poet/vocalist Anne Waldman) - they recorded the topical song "Going to San Diego" – with lyrics inspired by the announcement that the 1972 Republican Convention would be held in Southern California. Earlier, on November 4th, Dylan had recorded a classic protest song "George Jackson" – paying tribute to the black political prisoner who'd been murdered by prison guards in early August.

John & Yoko were now living in Manhattan and hanging with Jerry Rubin, who was energized to knock Nixon out of the White House during his '72 bid for re-election. Lennon liked the politics that Jerry was feeding him and impressed by where Dylan was headed musically.

As it echoed his own "Power To The People," as well as anticipating the yet to be recorded Some Time in New York City album. Lennon hoped Dylan would join him in a cross-country jamboree blending music and protest to help sway the presidential race.

John Lennon - New York City

Jerry Rubin not only has the distinction of being name-checked on two different songs on the Some Time in New York City album – he also performed as a 'percussionist' with John & Yoko several times during that period. Yet, he couldn't even play an instrument!

The John Lennon song "New York City" that closes side one of the Some Time in New York City album states, "Standing on the corner, just me and Yoko Ono - we was waiting for Jerry to land." While on the home demo version (on the John Lennon Anthology box set) Lennon sang, " I was standing on the corner, just me and Yoko Ono - we was holding Jerry Rubin by the hand."

Yoko Ono - We're All Water

Yoko told me and Abbie Hoffman that John & Yoko considered us to be great artists. Abbie replied, "That's funny, we always thought of you as great politicians." - Jerry Rubin

The lyrics on Yoko's song "We're All Water" (which ends side two of Some Time In New York City) has verses that pair together an odd cast of characters including: Chairman Mao & Nixon, Marilyn Monroe & Lenny Bruce, Eldridge Cleaver & the Queen of England and this wishful couple, "There may not be much difference between Raquel Welch and Jerry Rubin, if we hear their heartbeat."

MC5 - I'm Mad Like Eldridge Cleaver

In the months leading up to the 1968 Democratic Convention, the Yippies had invited thousands of left wing college students, hippies and outspoken radicals like poet Allen Ginsberg and novelist Norman Mailer. Politically savvy musicians such as the Jefferson Airplane and Country Joe & the Fish were slated to play, but dropped out as rumors of impending violence began to spread. In the end, the only musicians brave enough to weather the storm were those madmen from Michigan, the MC5 (managed by John Sinclair of the White Panther Party) and folksinger Phil Ochs, who was more committed to the revolution than he was to his music career.

John Sinclair & Wayne Kramer of the MC5 still enjoy a friendship with Black Panther David Hilliard to this day. The White Panther Party, despite its naïve hippie drug-infused antics, was truly in awe of the Black Panther's skills and philosophy. Musically, this was reflected in an eighteen-minute discourse entitled "I'm Mad Like Eldridge Cleaver" – which the MC5 performed at Detroit's Grande Ballroom during 1968. In typical MC5 style, it's an avant-garde blues-based jam, building in intensity with acid rock overtones as vocalist Rob Tyner rages.

The opening lines are "I'm mad out on the street; I'm frothing at the mouth, pissed." As the song builds, Tyner screams "I'm mad, I'm mad, like Eldridge Cleaver is mad!" It's the sound of white hippies channeling the urban black man's angst against the authoritarian system. While whites can never know the black man's burden, the MC5 tried to empathize. "Cleaver" was a reworking of John Lee Hooker's "I'm Bad like Jesse James."

Another song they took from Hooker's repertoire was "Motor City is Burning" (written by Al Smith) and included on the MC5's seminal Kick Out The Jams. Rob Tyner adds passionate words of his own, including praising the Black Panthers for their alleged role in the Detroit July 1967 riots.


Rolling Stones - Street Fighting Man
Beatles – Revolution

The '68 Chicago Democratic Convention was held at the International Amphitheatre. That's where Hubert Humphrey, Mayor Daley and thousands of delegates gathered. The Chicago 8 Trial began on September 24th, 1969. The Rolling Stones tour documented in the infamous Gimme Shelter film stopped in Chicago (sans film crew) on the 16th of November, in of all places – International Amphitheatre!

It was a Sunday night, Abbie had the "day off" so he and his wife Anita made their way backstage to greet Mick Jagger and see if the "Street Fighting Man" wanted to make a donation to the cause (his reply was terse, he did not!).

After all, "Street Fighting Man" had been released as a '45 rpm single on August 31st ' 68, just 48 hours after the rioting in Chicago calmed down. Jagger had been inspired by a large demonstration in London's Grosvenor Square, which he had witnessed first hand. The event caused quite a stir in Britain and featured speeches by actress Vanessa Redgrave and Tariq Ali – an outspoken anti-war activist in the UK. Coincidently, the Beatles released their high-energy version of John Lennon's "Revolution" as a single on the 26th of August '68, some 48 hours before violence erupted in Chicago (a more laid-back version appeared on the White Album released later that year).

Doors - Peace Frog

Besides a great groove, for the lyrics:

Blood in the streets in the town of Chicago….
Blood in the streets in the town of New Haven

Blood stains the roofs and the palm trees of Venice
Blood in my love in the terrible summer
Bloody red sun of fantastic L.A.

Pat Thomas and Did It! From Yippie To Yuppie: Jerry Rubin, An American Revolutionary links:

excerpt from the book
excerpt from the book
video trailer for the book

Kirkus review
Los Angeles Times review
PopMatters review
Village Voice review

Deborah Kalb interview with the author
San Diego Troubadour interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Rodrigo Hasbún "Affections"

Affections

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Rodrigo Hasbún's Affections is a fascinating novel of family and revolution.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Hasbún writes with patience and precision, revealing the family’s most intimate thoughts and interactions: first smokes, blind love, and familial devotion. This is a novel to savor for its richness and grace and its historical and political scope."


In his own words, here is Rodrigo Hasbún's Book Notes music playlist for his novel Affections:



(translated by Sophie Hughes)


I wrote Affections listening over and over again to the sessions that Chet Baker and Bill Evans recorded together. I know very little about the sessions themselves, and even less about jazz in general, but to me there's something utterly hypnotic about those fifteen tracks. Hearing the same music on repeat is curious in that sense: after a while you stop hearing it, but even then it lulls you into a certain state of mind, into a kind of sensory disposition useful for writing.

Back then I was living in Toronto and I didn't like working in the apartment we rented, so every morning I went out looking for some café where I could spend the next four or five hours. There are, then, at least a dozen good cafes behind Affections, and all of them are full of strangers, and in the background you can make out Chet Baker's sinuous and tragic trumpet, and Bill Evans' delicate, luminous piano. Those songs that helped me write Affections don't, however, take me back to the novel when I hear them. It's for this reason, and because otherwise it would be pretty dull, that I've been true to the unruly spirit of playlists when selecting my own. This is a playlist I might have listened to at the end of one of those writing days, when I would go wandering around the city. It's a playlist straight out of the streets and neighborhoods of Toronto, but precisely thanks to the music, they can transform suddenly into the streets and neighborhoods of Cochabamba, Santiago, Barcelona, or Ithaca, all cities where I'd lived prior to that year. If music has a power, I would say it's this: it allows us to travel through time and space, and it takes us back to moments and places that we cannot return to by other means.

There is no logic running through these twelve songs, only a jumble of styles, voices and eras, of intensities and rhythms that vaguely remind me of Affections. Some of the songs I heard for the first time on my iPod. Many more played out of a Walkman which I still keep in my desk.

Caught In Between – Micah P. Hinson
The main characters in Affections are a family of Germans who move to Bolivia in the mid 1950s to try to start again. From then on they all become somewhat trapped between this place and that, between the past and the present, between one life and another. I don't suppose Micah P. Hinson had any of this in mind when he wrote the song, but each time I listen to it, it brings back that liminal feeling, so common among those who no longer know where home is.

There Is a War – Leonard Cohen
Old Leonard was wise before he was even old, and this much he knew from the start: there are wars raging everywhere, between the rich and the poor, between men and women, between those who know there's a war on and those who don't. I have no doubt that Monika, the eldest and strongest of the daughters in Affections, would agree. At the beginning of the novel she is part of the group oblivious to the fact that there is a war on. Toward the end, she's ready to kill, and be killed, for her convictions.

El matador – Los Fabulosos Cadillacs
In some of those invisible wars this song plays loud and clear.

Manuel Santillán, el León – Los Fabulosos Cadillacs
And this one, its sister song.

Wish You Were Here – Pink Floyd
"So, so you think you can tell heaven from hell, blue skies from pain? Can you tell a green field from a cold steel rail? A smile from a veil?"

Cry, Baby, Cry – Janis Joplin
There's urgency in Janis Joplin's howls. There's vulnerability and emotional commitment. There's enduring ghosts and painful contradictions. Everything a novel needs to survive.

Fly – Nick Drake
Such sweetness, such kindness. We owe Nick Drake a life. His tone and voice never fail to move me. In some way they remind me of Trixi, the youngest of the daughters in the novel. She, too, needs "a second grace, a second face". She, too, wants to learn to fly.

En la ciudad de la furia: MTV Unplugged – Soda Stereo
The voices of Gustavo Cerati and Andrea Echeverri meld together delightfully in the middle of the jungle of eerie sounds. There are no more fairytales in the city of fury, he says. He's talking about Buenos Aires, but it could be any other city. La Paz, say, in the eyes of the unhappily married Monika, who haunts its streets searching for herself.

We No Who U R – Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
"Tree don't care what the little bird sings. We go down with the dew in the morning light. The tree don't know what the little bird brings. We go down with the dew in the morning. And we breathe it in. There is no need to forgive."

Idioteque – Radiohead
"I have seen too much I haven't seen enough you haven't seen it I'll laugh until my head comes off women and children first and children first and children here I'm alive everything all of the time here I'm alive everything all of the time ice age coming ice age coming let me hear both sides let me hear both sides"

Feeling Good – Nina Simone
The more peaceful days, when everything seems easier –why are they so hard to capture? Will we ever learn how to write about them? Or, rather, does that peacefulness, so elusive, so necessary, only ever last a moment? If that's the case, I want to believe that there are a few such moments dotted throughout the novel, hidden beneath the commotion of daily life.

God Yu Tekkem Laef Blong Mi – Hans Zimmer, Gavin Greenaway
In the scene in The Thin Red Line when this choral piece plays, Private Witt takes advantage of a ceasefire to leave his Company and go and live among a community of Melanesians. In the middle of all the carnage, he finds a way to be closer to something that has remained impervious to the destruction, a way to be closer to the secret splendor of the world. Yes, Malick seems to be telling us in that scene, there are always wars going on –constant, interminable, brutal. But there is also this. Solidarity, the sense of belonging, the promise of better times. Children's voices, their games and their faith. The sea.


Rodrigo Hasbún and Affections links:

excerpt from the book

Financial Times review
Kirkus review
The National review
Publishers Weekly review
The Scotsman review

Houston Matters interview with the author
Quarterly Conversation interview with the author
The White Review interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Largehearted Boy's 2017 Summer Reading Suggestions

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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