February 27, 2017

Book Notes - Elena Passarello "Animals Strike Curious Poses"

Animals Strike Curious Poses

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Elena Passarello's new essay collection Animals Strike Curious Poses is a dazzling bestiary about animals famous in their time and humans' relationships with them.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"This phenomenal collection documents the lives of particular animals from a wide range of species…. Passarello treats her subjects with dextrous care, weaving narratives together in a way that investigates, honors, and complicates her subjects…. Passarello has created a consistently original, thoroughly researched, altogether fascinating compendium."


In her own words, here is Elena Passarello's Book Notes music playlist for her essay collection Animals Strike Curious Poses:



All the essays in Animals Strike Curious Poses are devoted to famous creatures in history. The book tells the stories of certain animals that inspired human art, music, medicine, exploration, and myth. Since each essay is devoted to a single, noteworthy creature, I thought it'd be fun to make a similar playlist—one song for each beast. Full disclosure: I had way too much fun putting this together.

Local Natives, "Wooly Mammoth"
The book begins with "Yuka," an essay on a mammoth recently found preserved—much of her red fur still attached—in the Siberian permafrost. When she lived (about 39,000 years ago), Yuka could have run across Siberia into Alaska, as there was no ocean separating the two continents. I like how the pressing rhythm of this Local Natives song sounds like a massive quadruped running across a continent as fast as she can.

Howlin' Wolf, "The Wolf is at Your Door"
My book takes its structure from the medieval bestiary—an encyclopedic "book of beasts" that describes both real and imagined creatures. Many "facts" in a bestiary were fanciful: one book says that wolves steal the voices of men, for example; never open your door to a wolf, another says. Around 1200CE, Saint Francis of Assisi convinced the town of Gubbio to let a wolf into its gates, despite the warnings of all those bestiaries. I wonder what would have happened if that wolf sounded like the resplendent, sinister Chester "Howlin' Wolf" Burnett. Burnett sounds like a man who stole a wolf's voice—a bestiary inversion. Poor Gubbio would be no match for such a sound.

Adrian Belew, (f/ David Byrne), "The Lone Rhinoceros"
When a rhinoceros arrived at Lisbon Harbor in 1515, it was the first of its kind to greet Europe in a millennium. The lone rhino survived less than a season, but in that time, a description of the beast made its way to the great German artist Albrecht Dürer, who then made a notorious woodcut of the creature. Many call "Dürer's Rhino" the world's first viral image, as it sold zillions of prints in the coming two centuries. The woodcut gets a lot of the biological details wrong, so generations of Europeans lived and died thinking a rhino looked the way one man imagined it (Salvador Dali cites it as one of his favorite examples of reality). How fascinating that one lonely beast could replicate so mightily, and in so much error.

Descendents, "I Wanna Be A Bear"
Just like the life of Sackerson, star bear of the Elizabethan animal fighting ring right next to Shakespeare's Globe theater, this 42-second punk song is nasty, brutish, and short.

Run the Jewels, "Close Your Eyes and Meow to Fluff"
Meow the Jewels—the 2015 remix of Run the Jewels' second album using only cat sound samples—is one of my favorite cultural products from the past decade. El-P, one-half of RTJ, made the album on an Internet dare, and he said the process drove him a little batty. I can't think of a better song to accompany "Jeoffry," my remix of a 250 year-old cat poem written by Christopher Smart while Smart was interned in a London asylum. What can I say? Cats make humans do crazy things.

Insane Clown Posse, "Leck Mich Im Arsch"
OK. Bear with me here. My essay "Vogel Staar" discusses Mozart's beloved pet starling, which would whistle the maestro's compositions back to him as he worked, usually after taking sonic liberties. Mozart loved the starling's silly edits because he, too, liked to make silly music. The pair spent three productive years together and one of the pieces Mozart composed in that time (along with Don Giovanni and The Magic Flute) was a vulgar ditty called "Leck Mich Im Arsch," or "Lick My Butt." Don't ask me why Insane Clown Posse (with Jack White ?!?) decided to cover this Mozart deep cut, but I think it's a downright starling move. I love the way they pronounce the lyrics—and even Mozart's name—totally wrong, just like the starling mangled his music back in the day. And Mozart would love all the scatological rhyming the Clowns do in this track. He was a noted fan of poop humor, and were he alive today, I think he might even identify as a Juggaloo.

Modest Mouse, "The Tortoise and the Tourist"
A decade ago, Steve "Crocodile Hunter" Irwin's zoo started an advertising campaign that claimed their 175-year-old Galapagos tortoise, Harriet, had been brought back by Charles Darwin on the Beagle in 1835. "Proving" this involved wrenching a lot of facts to fit their narrative; the whole Harriet campaign is really just a bent spoon of historical records. So for my essay, I wrenched those same facts to prove that this tortoise was the love of Charles Darwin's life. Fifty bucks says mine is the only book on the market today with a sex scene between a tortoise and the father of evolutionary theory. And now you can imagine them boinking to this Modest Mouse song!

Black Sabbath, "War Pigs"
So I lied—most of the essays cover a single famous representative of a species, but not all of them. One exception is "War Pigs," which includes four famous homing pigeons and their respective service in four human wars. I just couldn't pick a single pigeon—these birds are truly amazing in their biology, their behavior, and their heroic acts—and I also couldn't resist the pun of the title.

Curtis Eller, "The Execution of Black Diamond"
If this playlist sends you to the work of only one musician, I hope it's this one. Curtis Eller is a terrific banjo player, songwriter, and showman, and this songwriter about a rampaging elephant from 1929 feels so much like a historical essay to me. It definitely ran through my head the entire time I was working on "Jumbo II," my sad history of circus elephants, electricity, and capital punishment as they were braided together through America's Gilded Age.

Langley Schools Music Project, "Desperado"
Just like with the pigeons, I couldn't pick only one horse for the book, either. The essay "Four Horsemen" covers a quartet of famous equines and the strange, ancient symbiosis their bodies can achieve with human bodies (and in a human's thoughts). I think that funny connection between young girls and horses—think Tina Belcher from Bob's Burgers—plays into this symbiotic history. You really hear it as this little Canadian tween sings this Eagles song, which has never sounded better than it does in her hands. "Desperado" always feels to me like it's more about a horse than a man.

Magnetic Fields, "A Chicken With Its Head Cut Off"
A surprising number of songs have been written about Mike the Headless Chicken (many of them, strangely, are instrumental). But for my money, nothing fits the tale of Mike—who survived, decapitated, for eighteen months of the 1940's and became a major draw on the sideshow circuit—than this tune that depicts a heart as "blind as a bat, getting up, fallin' down, getting' up." It's one of Stephen Merritt's 69 Love Songs, but I only think of Mike when I hear it. "Who'd fall in love with a chicken with its head cut off?" Merritt asks in his astonishing basso. AMERICA, STEPHEN, THAT'S WHO.

Arctic Monkeys, "Arabella"
When I heard this Arctic Monkeys song, I'd already begun my essay on Arabella, the SKYLAB garden spider that spun the universe's first interstellar web and became a TV sensation (Walter Cronkite was a big fan). I still can't believe this song wasn't written expressly with that astronaut spider in mind. Just listen to the lyrics! A female "made of outer-space" with a "seventies head" and "interstellar" glimmering boots (eight of them, perhaps?). In the song, and in history, Arabella rides "in the passenger side" of a spaceship headed toward the horizon, irresistible to anyone who witnesses her. Just imagine Walter Cronkite singing it.

"Lancelot"
The only personal essay in the book (well, they're all personal because I wrote them and I am a person, so let's say the only essay written with an "I" voice) is "Lancelot," which recounts a trip to the circus in 1985. There, my seven-year-old self saw a "unicorn"--aka a surgically altered goat with a pastel-bedazzled, very wang-like horn sprouting from its forehead. When he was wheeeled around the ring by totally 80's beauty pageant lady in a zillion sequins, it sounded a little something like this.

Charlie Parker, "Koko"
Koko the sign language gorilla was also a big part of my childhood; I'll never forget that National Geographic cover of her cradling All Ball, the orange kitten that she purportedly named herself. She's also the only creature I discuss in the book that's still alive. So here is a song for you, Koko. Since you were born on July 4th, you were given the name Hanabiko, which means "fireworks child." I can hear fireworks in the Bop pyrotechnics of Charlie Parker's saxophone throughout this song and I hope you can, too.

Neva Eder, "Never Smile at a Crocodile"
I uncovered a lot of absurd pieces of culture in the years that I worked on this book. In the running for the weirdest of all is this Australian elementary school textbook that includes a section on Osama, a crocodile that ate dozens of fishermen on and near the shores of Lake Victoria. The comprehension questions at the end of the section are like, "what words are synonyms to ‘horrifying' and ‘fiendish'?" and "what does ‘devoured' mean?" This made me think of all the children's stories and songs that discuss, recount, or sing about the violent things an animal can still do to humans—an early lesson, perhaps, in irrational fear.

Lou Reed, "Last Great American Whale"
The last long essay in the book is "Celia," about the first mammal ever to be brought back from extinction. The "de-extincted" buccardo only lived for a few minutes, but she represents a new chapter in our relationship with animals—the ways in which we're scrambling to bring them back. In today's scientific discussions, I hear a deep fear of loneliness accompanying all the reported enthusiasm. That fear is a voice resigned to the fact that we've made a mess of things, and it sort of sounds like Lou Reed to me.

Bob Dylan, "Man Gave Names to All the Animals"
I knew I wanted to title my book with song lyrics (a tradition begun with my first book, Let Me Clear My Throat). And I love this song, which always strikes me as Dylan's kiddie number. It's also a fitting pairing to the story of the dentist who shot Cecil the Lion; that man says he wouldn't have fired his gun had he known the big cat was given a name. What does it mean that the naming of an animal brings it closer to us? How can we care about animals without labeling them? Can we even believe in a thing we haven't touched in some way? Someone else will need to write another book—and make another playlist—to figure that out.


Elena Passarello and Animals Strike Curious Poses links:

Kirkus Reviews review
Portland Mercury review
Publishers Weekly review

KLCC interview with the author
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Let Me Clear My Throat


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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February 27, 2017

Book Notes - Susan Defreitas "Hot Season"

Hot Season

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Activism and love are the themes of Susan DeFreitas's stunning debut novel Hot Season.

Cari Luna wrote of the book:

"Hot Season, Susan DeFreitas's finely wrought debut novel, explores the charged terrain where the youthful search for identity meets environmental activism and the romantic, illicit lure of direct action. A compelling book."


In her own words, here is Susan Defreitas's Book Notes music playlist for her debut novel Hot Season:



My debut novel, Hot Season, is a coming-of-age story set at a college known for its radical politics. Over the course of the book—which the Portland Mercury called "activist lit [that] gets it right"—we spend time with punks and hippies at the local anarchist infoshop, go bar hopping in a bona fide Wild West town (the book is set in Arizona), and chill with the students and working poor of the barrio.

Needless to say, the book has a soundtrack, and it's not one you're liable to hear on your local Clear Channel affiliate.

1. Prologue: The Circus on 2nd Street
"I Dream a Highway Back to You" by Gillian WelchTime (The Revelator)

As the book opens, we meet Katie, a child of East Coast privilege who's decided to flip the script on parental expectations by moving across the country to Deep Canyon College. Despite her bravado, she's terrified—not only of the big move she's made but of the fact that she wants to be an artist. Late at night, she smears paint on canvas and listens to Gillian Welch, whose "husky whiskey voice and raw clawhammer banjo had sustained [her] through bouts of heartache and homesickness and crushing self-doubt that semester."

2. Chapter One: Pyrophitic
"Brick House" by The Commodoreseponymous

Hot Season revolves around three college roommates—Katie, Jenna, and Rell—two of whom are single and one of whom is unhappily coupled. It's girls' night out, and guess who's going to get hit on first?

Like my characters, I went to college in a small mountain town (Prescott, AZ), and the local bar scene was not rife with electrifying live music, nor were there a whole lot of reasons to throw off those Carhardtts and puffy coats for something a bit more festive. Funk night at Coyote Joe's was an excuse for all of us ladies to don the most outrageous outfits imaginable and get down like James Brown. Hearts were broken, relationships sparked, and, I'm sure, children conceived.

3. Chapter Two: Drylands Ecology
"Carta Abierto" by Los Tigres del NorteInternacionalmente norteños

Rell, the protagonist of Hot Season, was recently dumped by her trustafarian boyfriend, which forced her to move out of his pimped-out cabin in the mountains and into something a bit more affordable. That something turns out to be a room the size of a shoebox in a janky old rattrap in the barrio, a neighborhood that comes with itw own soundtrack.

I grew up in a farm town where Hispanic migrant workers come each year to pick the crops; for me, there is a sense of familiarity in the sound of ranchera, the "country music" of Mexico, nortena in particular. With its polka-like bass line and overwrought emotional lyrics, nortena is the opposite of intimidating—but for Katie's high-strung mother, who's dropped in out of the blue to check out her daughter's new digs, it's as alarming as the most aggressive of gangsta rap.

4. Chapter Three: Dry Heat
"One Nation Under" by BlackfireOne Nation Under

Back in the prologue, Katie met a nice older gentlemen who happened to have founded The Black Cat, Crest Top's anarchist infoshop. By the time this chapter arrives, that man, Dyson Lathe, is on the run from the FBI, and his girlfriend Michelle has to face the heat, both literally and figuratively, as the hot season is coming on.

To me, there is no song that better encapsulates the struggles taking place at the Black Cat—and activist centers across country—than Blackfire's "One Nation Under." Blackfire was a Native punk band from the Navajo Nation that, for me and many others in the Southwest, was the voice of the resistance in the Aughts.

5. Chapter Four: Entrapment
"The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald" by Gordon LightfootSummertime Dream

Remember Jenna, the roommate who's unhappily coupled? She really wants to leave her boyfriend, but managing a mature break up is too hard—she'd really sort of just rather cheat on him with the hot guy from the bike shop. Only problem is, the hot guy from the bike shop might be an undercover agent.

Like me, Jenna has a strong connection to American folk music, and to my mind, no song so thoroughly captures the beauty and power, as well as the extreme cheese factor, endemic to this genre as the song Neil Diamond made famous, "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald." As a kid, I was enthralled by it, the fact that it tells a true story of shipwreck on Lake Superior—but jeez, there are so many verses! The shipwreck seems to take forever.

In this, I found it an apt metaphor for Jenna's relationship with Scott—and though the section where Jenna plays the song was eventually cut from the book, it remains, to me, the soundtrack of this chapter.

6. Chapter Five: Rad Summer
"West Reign" by All Autonomy—unreleased

In this chapter, Rell's trying to locate her estranged roommate, Katie, and follows her trail to The Black Cat. There Rell runs into a friend from work, Arin, and Arin's friend Gabriel, two teenagers who are part of the local punk scene. Gabriel, though introduced briefly here, occupies a central role in Book Three of the Greene River trilogy.

Gabriel is based on a real person, Brian Gianelli, who was the lead singer of the popular Prescott punk band All Autonomy. They turned down a major record deal because they, you know, were punk AF, and not long after, Brian Gianelli died, tragically young. RIP.

7. Chapter Six: Raleigh for the Cause
"Black Masks and Gasoline" by Rise AgainstRevolutions per Minute

In this chapter, illusions that have been perpetuated through the novel are revealed for what they are. And while I can't say too much without offering spoilers, many of the truths behind them turn out to be less than flattering.

To me, this song perfectly encapsulates two classically adolescent ideas—that of hiding your true self behind a mask and the need for violent, "no compromise" revolution. How perfect that, in the act of pouring gasoline, as suggested in this song, the saboteur must wear a mask—presumably because he's showing his "true self?" The adolescent contradictions are both totally understandable and utterly maddening.

8. Chapter Seven: The Underground Waterfall
"Meat is Murder" by The SmithsMeat Is Murder

In this chapter, Michele, down at The Black Cat, is faced by the one-two punch of some difficult news, both on the personal and political front. For someone with her history of addiction and self-harm, this a dangerous time.

Though Michele's too angry to be the sort of emo-chick who would have listened to the Smiths, the struggle at the heart of her childhood is very much in the spirit of this song: she's so sensitive to the cruelty upon which modern life is built that she cannot "stomach it."

9. Chapter Eight: Hot Season
"Green Valley" by PusciferConditions of My Parole

In this chapter, we see Rell struggling with the big question of what to do with her life, postgrad: The pipe dream of planting trees, way up north in Canada; the safe, salaried desk job in Iowa; or a risky internship in her college town that will put her at the heart of the struggle to save the Greene River.

That river is based on the Verde River, which the subject of this song by Puscifer, the side project of Tool front man Maynard James Keenan. Keenan actually owns a home on Mingus Mountain, near the town of Jerome, overlooking the Verde Valley. Presumably, it called to him the way the Greene River, in this chapter, calls to Rell.

10. Epilogue: Dead Man's Revival
"Old Number Seven" by The Devil Makes Threeeponymous

"The show that night had boiled down to a party, and the party had boiled down to this: nine people propped up on pillows and each other, listening to Jenna picking clawhammer banjo with the Devil." In the epilogue, the book's cast of characters have joined the members of an underground circus for a late-night session of songs and stories.

This song by The Devil Makes Three takes me back to similar times in my own life—times when an impromptu party might turn into a night you'd remember for the rest of your life. When mysterious travelers might blow into your sleepy little town trailing stardust. A time when we passed the bottle and sang songs and shared travelers' tales and forged friendships, some of which, like the stories, would stand the test of time.


Susan Defreitas and Hot Season links:

the author's website
video trailer for the book

Arizona Daily Sun review
Huffington Post review
Portland Mercury review
Read It Forward review

Between the Covers interview with the author
Fiction Writers Review interview with the author
Prescott Daily Courier profile of the author
Spillers After Show interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (The Literary Legacy of Anthony Burgess, Antlers Frontman Peter Silberman on His New Solo Album, and more)

AL Kennedy examined the literary legacy of Anthony Burgess.


Antlers frontman Peter Silberman talked to Paste about his solo album Impermanence.


John Darnielle talked to the Iowa City Press-Citizen about his new novel Universal Harvester.


Stream a new Robyn Hitchcock song.


Anna Diamond on the importance of teaching historical fiction at the Atlantic.


Stream two previously unreleased Beck songs.


The Rumpus interviewed poet Eileen Myles.


Stream a new Foxtrot song.


The New York Times examined a Walden-themed video game.


All Things Considered interviewed members of the band Foxygen.


Melissa Febos talked to The Rumpus about her new memoir Abandon Me.


John Vanderslice discussed the benefits of analog recording with Tapeheads.


Author Mohsin Hamid warned of the dangers of nostalgia at the Guardian.


Patterson Hood of the Drive-By Truckers talked protest music with the Irish Times.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author David Shields.


DIY profiled Dave Longstreth of Dirty Projectors.


Laird Hunt talked to Poets & Writers about his novel The Evening Road.


Stream a new song by Tennis.


Bustle recommended books published in the past decade that every woman should read.


Stream a new Sondre Lerche song.


Weekend Edition interviewed Rowan Hisayo Buchanan about her debut novel, Harmless Like You.


The A.V. Club is streaming Middle Children's debut album Earth Angel.


Author Lionel Shriver talked to Weekend Edition about cultural appropriation.


Paste listed the sweetest punk love songs.


Nell Zink on reading Doris Lessing.


Writers listed five albums that made a difference in their lives at Dusted.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons
In Gratitude by Jenny Diski
Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton
Nashville Chrome by Rick Bass
Our Noise: The Story of Merge Records, the Indie Label That Got Big and Stayed Small
A Replacement Life by Boris Fishman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Master by Colm Toibin
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

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February 24, 2017

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - February 23, 2017

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Black History in its Own Words

Black History in its Own Words
by Ronald Wimberly

In January of 2015, artist Ron Wimberly was asked to find and illustrate eight quotes to be published in The Nib for Black History Month. He had “so much fun” that he drafted four more, and another twelve the following year. Black History in its Own Words is “a look at Black History framed by those who made it” and features wisdom from luminaries such as Jean-Michel Basquiat, Octavia Butler, and Serena Williams.


Things We Lost in the Fire

Things We Lost in the Fire
by Mariana Enriquez, translated by Megan McDowell

Renowned Argentinian author Mariana Enriquez makes her English-language debut with Things We Lost in the Fire, a collection of short stories in the tradition of Julio Cortàzar and Shirley Jackson. Enriquez’s characters are at the mercy of her imagination as they are placed into banal situations only to be yanked down dark paths. Written in mesmerizing prose, these macabre tales explore the effects of desire and passion when they are let off the leash.


Starseeds

Starseeds
by Charles Glaubitz

Starseeds is the first graphic novel from multi-media artist Charles Glaubitz. The book maps the mythology of the warrior-like Starseed Children who do battle with the Illuminati—imagined by Glaubitz as having created a fifth element that can become any object of desire. This is an excellent debut comic book sporting vivid art and blistering storytelling.


Identity Unknown: Rediscovering Seven American Women Artists

Identity Unknown: Rediscovering Seven American Women Artists
by Donna Seaman

Donna Seaman—acclaimed author, editor, and critic—has dragged seven twentieth-century women artists from the depths of obscurity, artists whose work was top-notch yet overlooked for their male counterpoints. In compassionate, illuminating prose Seaman champions the lives and works of these seminal artists who called to be judged for their art rather than their gender.


Shot-Blue

Shot-Blue
by Jesse Ruddock

Shot-Blue is an electric debut novel from a young Canadian writer. Reading Jesse Ruddock’s prose sentence to sentence is like rowing at high speed, each stroke forward is a blunt, visceral experience. Shot-Blue is a story of poverty, youth, and loneliness, told with a purposeful gait and searing language.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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This Week's Interesting Music Releases - February 24, 2017

Dirty Projectors

Dirty Projectors' self-titled release is one of my favorite albums of the year.

NE-HI's Offers, Peter Silberman's Impermanence (the first solo album from the Antlers frontman), Sun Kil Moon's Common As Light and Love Are Red Valleys of Blood, and Xiu Xiu's Forget are all new albums I can recommend.

Vinyl reissues include the 18-LP George Harrison: The Collection (which collects all of his studio albums, live album, and two picturediscs) and a 3-LP deluxe edition of The Who's My Generation, and Andrew Bird's The Mysterious Production of Eggs.

What new music are you looking forward to or enjoying this week?


This week's interesting music releases:

Aaron Watson: Vaquero
Acceptance: Colliding By Design
All Them Witches: Sleeping Through the War
Andrew Bird: The Mysterious Production of Eggs (reissue) [vinyl]
Balto: Strangers
Bill Plaskett & Joel Plaskett: Solidarity
Brian Jonestown Massacre: Don't Get Lost
Brian Owens: The Soul of Ferguson
Children Of Alice: Children Of Alice
Circus Devils Laughs Last
Clap Your Hands Say Yeah: The Tourist
Crystal Fairy: Crystal Fairy
Dams Of The West: Youngish American
David Bowie: No Plan EP
Dirty Projectors: Dirty Projectors
Dutch Uncles: Big Balloon
Froth: Outside (Briefly)
George Harrison: Thirty Three & 1/3 (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: All Things Must Pass (3-LPs) (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Brainwashed (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Cloud 9 (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: The Collection (18-LP box set) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Dark Horse (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Electronic Sound (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Extra Texture (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: George Harrison (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Gone Troppo (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Live in Japan (2-LPs) (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Living In The Material World (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Somewhere in England (reissue) [vinyl]
George Harrison: Wonderwall Music (reissue) [vinyl]
The Feelies: In Between
Hippo Campus: Landmark
John Zorn: Garden of Earthly Delights
King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard: Flying Microtonal Banana
Los Campesinos!: Sick Scenes
The Luyas: Human Voicing
Modern Baseball: The Perfect Cast [vinyl]
Ne-Hi: Offers
Never Land Orchestra: Legend of Zelda: 30th Anniversary Concert
Oddisee: The Iceberg
Old 97's: Graveyard Whistling
Paul Weller: Heavy Soul (reissue) [vinyl]
Paul Weller: Stanley Road (reissue) [vinyl]
Peter Silberman: Impermanence
Pissed Jeans: Why Love Now
Rhiannon Giddens: Freedom Highway
Roy Orbison: Black & White Night 30 Edition (DVD & CD)
Scott H. Biram: The Bad Testament
Six Organs of Admittance: Burning the Threshold
Sun Kil Moon: Common As Light and Love Are Red Valleys of Blood
Thundercat: Drunk
Various Artists: Lullaby Renditions of Beyonce
Wesley Stace: Wesley Stace's John Wesley Harding
The Who: My Generation (deluxe 3-LP edition) [vinyl]
Xiu Xiu: Forget


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

Essential and Interesting "Best of 2016" Music Lists

weekly music release lists

100 online sources for free and legal music downloads
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Haruki Murakami's New Novel, Reconsidering Elliott Smith's Either/Or Album, and more)

Haruki Murakami's new novel Killing Commendatore went on sale today in Japan.

The Asahi Shimbun collected readers' early reviews.


Pitchfork took a closer look at Elliott Smith's Either/Or album, first released 20 years ago.


Buke and Gass covered PJ Harvey's "Dress."


The Guardian profiled author Yiyun Li.


The band Blitzen Trapper has written a musical.


People Holding features new short fiction by Marcy Dermansky.


Stream a new song by the New Pornographers.


At the New Yorker, Rebecca Traister discussed re-reading Margaret Atwood's novel The Handmaid's Tale one month into the Trump presidency.


PopMatters profiled singer-songwriter Sarah Bethe Nelson.


The London Evening Standard recommended the best books about the Russian revolution.


The Fader profiled Sorority Noise's Cameron Boucher.


Paste interviewed Emil Ferris about her graphic novel My Favorite Thing Is Monsters.


Science has determined the most depressing Radiohead song.


The London Evening Standard recommended the best books about the Russian revolution.


Paste listed the best emo music videos.


The Economist examined the power of graphic novels to explain the refugee crisis.


Drowned in Sound reconsidered Feist's Metals album.


Signature shared a primer to the works of author Jim Shepard.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons
In Gratitude by Jenny Diski
Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton
Nashville Chrome by Rick Bass
Our Noise: The Story of Merge Records, the Indie Label That Got Big and Stayed Small
A Replacement Life by Boris Fishman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Master by Colm Toibin
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

February 23, 2017

Book Notes - Kris D'Agostino "The Antiques"

The Antiques

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Kris D'Agostino's novel The Antiques is fast-paced, dark, and funny.

The New York Times wrote of the book:

"There's not a sluggish moment in Kris D'Agostino’s second novel . . . with sharp, funny dialogue that never seems formulaic. More impressively, he conveys the disorienting and ever-shifting effects of grief."


In his own words, here is Kris D'Agostino's Book Notes music playlist for his novel The Antiques:



I have a playlist that I listen to on repeat whenever I’m at my desk writing. The list is mostly songs from the original London cast recording of Les Miserables and it probably doesn’t make for a very interesting playlist, so I’m going to focus more on music that was part of my life while I was writing and editing my second novel, The Antiques—Music that, in essence, provided the backdrop for the novel.

When I wrote my first book, The Sleepy Hollow Family Almanac, I wanted the main character to be someone who listened to a ton of music, constantly, but at the same time I wanted to avoid writing about music, if that makes any sense. I feel like it’s a hard thing to do: to try to capture with words the emotions and sensations you experience audibly. It seems nearly impossible.

The Antiques has as its central characters three siblings whose lives are informed by music in a lot of ways, but none of that comes forward in the prose, or at least, not as intensely as it did in my first novel. Charlotte, the middle child, listens exclusively to Tom Waits during the course of the book. And indeed while I was writing it, I too was going through a Tom Waits phase.

The following list is a curated guide to several songs either inspired me, or that I discovered or, or old favorites that I revisited, or new ones that somehow intensely impressed themselves upon me and the world I was trying to write about in The Antiques. There were certainly lots of others, but these are some of my favorites:

Tom Waits – "Take Me Home”
This song seemed to inform the entire scope of the book in a weird way. "The world’s not round without you," still feels like the most succinct and beautiful way to express how you can miss someone even though life goes on without them. It was kind of the jumping off point for the whole thing.

Xiu Xiu – "Dear God, I Hate Myself"
I don’t think anyone in the novel actively hates themselves, they just want to make their lives better and overcome the situations they’ve found themselves in. Also, side note, "I will always be nicer to the cat, than I am to you," is possibly the best lyric of all time.

Dirty Three – "This Night"
I’ve actually only recently—as in the last couple years recently—gotten into Dirty Three. I’m not sure why I slept on them for so long, since I have so many friends who love them. I could listen to "This Night" on loop for hours. It’s one of those propulsive, emotional instrumental songs (that Dirty Three do better than anyone) that once it gets its hooks into you don’t want it to end.

Naps – "Social Skills"
This Florida band came out of nowhere for me. I read about them on one of the music blogs I like and then this song immediately attained a mythic status in my mind and then boom they broke up, just like that. But they left a lot behind in a short period of time. The looping guitar line, combined with the spot-on lyrics and the way the chorus repeats for so long: It’s perfect. And it also in a lot of ways reflects the emotional state of the characters in the novel. For lots of reasons, we’re not always equipped to handle the things life puts in our path and our dependence on drugs, of whatever kind, our self-imposed crutches, don’t always help.

Vic Chesnutt – "You are Never Alone"
This song is about a lot of different things, none of which are relevant to the novel, but at the same time, the sentiment that whatever the thing is that’s keeping you down, whatever your ailment or affliction, you are not alone as you stumble and flail through this life, is a strong one. I have been in love with Vic Chesnutt since I was a teenager. R.I.P. to that wonderful man.

Kraftwerk – "Radioactivity"
Somewhere during the writing of The Antiques I finally sat down and watched all 15+ hours of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Berlin Alexanderplatz. The "epilogue" to the film is a two-hour movie—unique in it’s own right—and Fassbinder had the balls to make/name it "My Dream of the Dream of Franz Biberkopf by Alfred Döblin, An Epilogue." And that’s literally what it is. He constructed a two-hour film that was his "dream" about the "dream" that the main character had based on the author’s writing of that character. Needless to say, it is the best part of the whole epic thing. And literally 80% of it is set to this one Kraftwerk song, just popping back up, over and over, and always with amazing impact. I’m not sure you can just watch the epilogue without viewing the13 hours leading up to it, but what do I know?

Brian Eno – "The Big Ship"
During the writing of The Antiques, I spent eight months (yes, eight months) reading Infinite Jest. After I was done I then read as much about David Foster Wallace’s life as I could get my hands on, including the D.T. Max biography Every Love Story is a Ghost Story. There’s a lot in it about DFW’s musical obsessions. He loved R.E.M. (so do I) and he loved Brian Eno (who doesn’t?) and he spoke often about his particular fondness for "The Big Ship" and how as a student he would get really high and listen to the song over and over again and try to get his head around it. It’s that good.

This Heat – "A New Kind of Water"
When I first heard This Heat, in college, it was one of those lame, revelatory moments that we all experience. I was played their album, Deceit, and that was it, I didn’t know there were people out there making music like that. I was still a teenager. It was eye-opening. I’d been waiting for music like that without even knowing I was waiting. Boom. I will always revisit this album and it has remained in heavy rotation for nearly a decade now.

Joan Shelley – "Remedios"
Joan Shelley’s voice is transporting and ethereal. Her lyrics are always top notch and her songwriting about perfect. And yet this one, with no "real" words, only a beautifully sung melodic harmony that builds and builds to a crescendo, is one of my favorites.

Lower Dens – "To Die in L.A."
I would not mind dying in L.A. It seems as good a place as any. I love the city and since I don’t live there, I did the next best thing and decided to make one of my characters live there. Vicarious living, the sad author way!


Kris D'Agostino and The Antiques links:

the author's website

BookPage review
Financial Times review
Kirkus review
New York Times review
Newsday review
Publishers Weekly review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for The Sleepy Hollow Almanac
The Rumpus interview with the author
Salon interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (The Best Books on Race and Racism in America, Stream the New Grandaddy Album, and more)

The New York Times listed the best books on race and racism in America.


NPR Music is streaming Grandaddy's new album Last Place.


Jezebel interviewed author Jessa Crispin.


Whitney covered Bob Dylan's "Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You."


Brooklyn Magazine profiled author Roxane Gay.


Stream a new Bleached song.


The Cut interviewed poet Morgan Parker.


Stream a new Ride song.


The winners of the 2017 PEN Literary Awards have been announced.


Agnes Obel visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


The Los Angeles Times Book Prize finalists have been announced.


Joyce Manor and 100% released a split single (of Stephin Merritt covers) to benefit Planned Parenthood.


Poet H. Melt talked food with Entropy.


PopMatters profiled the band Los Campesinos!.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Christina Kline Baker's novel A Piece of the World.


SPIN profiled Dave Longstreth of Dirty Projectors.


BuzzFeed shared a new poem by Jan Beatty.


Stream a new Mountain Goats song.


Tin House interviewed author Jenny Zhang.


amNY interviewed singer-songwriter Craig Finn.


The Rumpus Book Club interviewed Damian Duffy and John Jennings about their graphic novel adaptation of Octavia Butler’s classic novel Kindred.


Stream a new At the Drive-In song.


Literary Hub shared a literary guide to the Oscars.


Paste profiled the band Dude York.

The 13 tracks on Sincerely, are, in contrast to their booming, brash arrangements, plainly vulnerable, truthful and deal with familiar feelings of quarter-life malaise.


Bookworm interviewed author Rachel Cusk.


Stream a new Alasdair Roberts song.


Emma Straub talked to the Brooklyn Eagle about her new Brooklyn bookstore Books Are Magic.


The Muse profiled the band Priests.


Chelsea Clinton talked books and reading with the New York Times.


Ted Leo is crowdfunding his new album.


Garrard Conley reminisced about writing his memoir Boy Erased at Electric Literature.


Kim Gordon shared an essay on Los Angeles Food at Lucky Peach.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons
In Gratitude by Jenny Diski
Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton
Nashville Chrome by Rick Bass
Our Noise: The Story of Merge Records, the Indie Label That Got Big and Stayed Small
A Replacement Life by Boris Fishman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Master by Colm Toibin
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

February 22, 2017

Book Notes - Jaimee Wriston Colbert "Wild Things"

Wild Things

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jaimee Wriston Colbert's short story collection Wild Things masterfully portrays the intersection man and nature in its lyrical prose.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Colbert (Shark Girls, 2009) hones her clarion vision of the interconnectedness and vulnerability of life in this edgy, knowing, situationally complex, and emotionally intricate short story collection. …. Colbert’s divining sense of brokenness and our longing for wholeness makes for extraordinarily incisive, stirring, funny, and haunting all-American stories."


In her own words, here is Jaimee Wriston Colbert's Book Notes music playlist for her short story collection Wild Things:



I don't listen to music while I write. In fact, I so desperately seek silence at my writing desk I once tried factory worker ear plugs, some sort of hardhat version of ear muffs that's supposed to cancel out sounds, just to stop the relay of dogs barking, leaf blowers, lawnmowers, the noise of summer in suburbia. However, before sitting down to write, when I retreat into my head and let my characters show their faces, speak their needs, tell me who they are, that's a story often set to music, some song on a feedback loop that gets stuck in my head until I replace it with another. I could be hiking the trails, a beach, strolling down a city sidewalk and I'm humming this song, plotting the conflict of my story. Or listening to Pandora at night, sprawled across my bed, supposedly doing leg lifts for my knee injury, but instead I'm following lyrics into the heart of a character.

My new linked collection, Wild Things, is about loss—personal, environmental, economical. It takes place primarily in a rural area of upstate New York, where the decline of manufacturing has hit folks pretty hard. It's been tagged "rural noir," and I suspect the noir part has to do with the abduction of a young girl by a man who wants to "save her." References to this create a novelistic arc, and one reads to find out what happens to the girl, but the stories also read as self-contained episodes. In other words, the book is episodic, much like a playlist, and it brings to mind how my teenage kids used to create mix-CDs for me (I'm probably dating myself!), where the songs were all different but somehow worked as a piece—as if all these different artists had gathered together and decided to do an album. So that's what I'm inspired to do here, a playlist for my stories, songs that are representational of the individual, becoming part of the whole, listening to these voices: the lyrics, my characters.

In the Prologue, "Elegy," we begin with loss, a woman whose brother has died, who reappears in several other stories, but this one with its magical realist vision also foreshadows environmental disaster—an ocean receding until dead fish tile the sandy floor, the sea where she scattered her brother's ashes. "Ain't no Sunshine When She's Gone," Bill Withers, 1971, his mournful lyrics: "I know I know I know I know… only darkness every day … anytime she goes away." The Prologue ends with the image of an alala, the nearly extinct Hawaiian crow, tattooed on her brother's shoulder.

In the first story "Gravity," Birdie is obsessed with birds, the freedom of flying away that birds represent, as she deals with her opioids-addicted mother. "White Bird," by It's A Beautiful Day, 1968. "White bird, in a golden cage… alone." A plaintive song with a trilling instrumental opening that sounds almost bird-like. "She must fly, or she will die." Like so many in these post-industrial areas, no jobs or low-paid service jobs, Birdie is trapped in a waitressing life. Sounds like something from a Trump-playbook, but Birdie refuses to be victimized. One day she will escape with her dynamite-wielding boyfriend, or more likely leave him behind, and fly!

We move into the first of two title stories: "Wild Things – Ghosts," and what better to accompany it than Lucinda Williams' evocative song from her new album (February 2016) that bears its name: "Ghosts of Highway 20." Jones, the protagonist in this story is a haunted man, with a past that unfolds like the highway Williams' sings about. The story opens with his memory of being sent to meet the father he never knew, twelve years old, traveling alone in a bus across country. His dad picks him up in Portland, Oregon and drives him to the gritty seacoast town of Seaside, where he manages a rundown motel. "Call me Bruce," his dad says. Williams sings: "And my fears continue to haunt me… truck stops … rundown motels …rusty junkyards," in her raw, gutsy voice. From his dad Jones learns how everything beautiful in the world is in peril, and now as an adult who's lost his mom in a meth lab-explosion (and believes she's returned as a ghost), he abducts a pretty young girl, believing she was in danger of being raped by her drug-dealer boyfriend, holding her captive in his trailer to "protect her."

It's the Cowboy Junkies languorous version of Lou Reed's "Sweet Jane," for the next story. "We Are All In Pieces" is about a teenaged girl whose heroin-addicted brother has disappeared, and her mom is strong-arming her into an abortion she doesn‘t want. Sadie, mourning her brother, knows that once the life inside of her is gone, she will be "as empty as the sky." Margo Timmins' enigmatic, evocative voice singing: "Anyone who's ever had a heart/ Wouldn't turn around and break it..." is the perfect accompaniment. Of course Lou Reed's history with the Velvet Underground is well known, and it's understood that 'Sweet Jane' is code for heroin.

"And here's to you, Mrs. Robinson, Jesus loves you more than you will know…" Simon and Garfunkel's lyrics made famous in the movie The Graduate. Nowadays we'd refer to Anne Bancroft's character as a "cougar"—a hot older woman coming on to a younger guy. Monty in "This is A Success Story" has not hit cougar-status yet, but she's definitely too old for contemplating sex with a teenaged boy. She's a failed mom, daughter of a depressed mom who failed her by committing suicide, who escapes into sexual fantasy, in much the same way as Nora in "Erosion," who can't conceive a child, thinks of sex as "hurting" and likes it rough. We'll call Nora "Wild Thing," since not using that iconic song by The Troggs somewhere in a book called Wild Things would seem remiss. "Wild Thing, I think you move me…." Parallel to Nora's barrenness is the erosion of a land so adversely affected by climate change, literally swallowed by the sea.

I could be cheesy and do something by Three Dog Night for the story "Dog Days." But this story exposes the heart of income inequality and loss in a community that had good jobs and now has nothing. It's the heat of summer and only the Jehovah Witnesses move from broken-down house to broken-down house. In one, a man who once prospered, his uninsured wife dying from lung cancer, tells his son to drown their dog because he can no longer afford to feed it. "Youngstown," Bruce Springsteen's woeful ballad about the demise of steel in Youngstown, Ohio sets the tone: "Now sir you tell me the world's changed/ Once I made you rich enough/ Rich enough to forget my name."

Time for some of the finest jazz ever recorded, Kind of Blue, Miles Davis's masterpiece studio album released in 1959 by Columbia Records. I put this on when I'm "in a mood," so to speak, and am blown away each time by its complexity and beauty. Fortune in "A Kind of Extinction" is obsessed with the color blue. The ignored child of a Tea Party Mom, she spies on her neighbor, the "beatnik," who plays the saxophone, making her feel "all shivery," and she imagines aquamarine, like the dying glaciers her science teacher talks about, "dead ice—a kind of extinction."

Change of mood for the story "Finding the Body," where teenaged Troy, guilt-ridden over the disappearance of his girlfriend (the girl abducted by Jones), and even more guilty over an accident caused by his dad that paralyzes a beautiful young woman, becomes obsessed with this woman and begins stalking her. I can't think of a more famous stalking song than "Every Breath You Take," by The Police. I used to feel more than a little disturbed by Sting's voice whining out those lyrics: "Every breath you take, every move you make…. I'll be watching you." But the wheelchair-bound Lois turns it around on Troy, teaching him a poignant lesson about messing with older women.

"I'm Just Here Until I'm Gone" is my prison story, so of course we have to play Johnny Cash's "Folsom Prison Blues." Imagine his deep, rumbly bass—better yet, put it on! "When I hear that whistle blowin', I hang my head and cry."

It's Eric Clapton's "Cocaine" for "The Man Who Jumped," because Janis had quite the problem with it in her earlier years, cocaine, misogynist hookups, all manner of failed jobs and dreams. Now she's with the depressed Ruth, waiting for rescuers to find the body of a man who jumped into the polluted Susquehanna River and disappeared. To the tune of Clapton's unrivaled guitar riffs, the story moves in fragments, each corresponding to the number of days it takes to find the body. "She don't lie, she don't lie, she don't lie."

The beautiful ballad "Trouble," sung by Elliott Smith on the Thumbsucker Soundtrack, accompanies the other "Wild Things" title story, "Migrants." This story gives us Loulie's point of view, the abducted girl, who's been held by Jones for months now and is yearning for her freedom. "Feels like every time I get back on my feet/ She {trouble} come around and knock me down again." Elliott Smith died of an apparent suicide in 2003. Risking a spoiler alert, I will tell you that Loulie does not.

"Suicide Birds" features crystal meth addiction, fracking, and ALS, not to mention a guy building a robot-wife out of Budweiser cans. Going with the drug addiction conceit it's "The Needle and the Damage Done," by Neil Young. "But every junkie's like a settin' sun…." And speaking of addiction, "Things Blow Up" is another story about Janis, who loses her twin brother to a meth overdose. The story remembers a time when they were together as young adults and the world still seemed hopeful, she and her brother wailing down the Massachusetts Turnpike, listening to Bob Dylan on the radio, singing "Knock knock knockin' on Heaven's door." The song hints at what is to come, but at that moment life is good, life wants to live.

"The Sea and the Rhythm" by Iron and Wine, is a passionate love song: "Your hands they move like waves over me…" My final story, "Aftermath," is about a long marriage, and despite Stella's anxiety over their runaway daughter, her husband's joblessness, pot smoking, and the massive destruction in their community from the Susquehanna's 500 year flood, it is their love in the end that sustains.

The Epilogue to Wild Things is "The Hoodie's Tale," featuring the mother of the abducted girl. With the sighting of a luminous, exotic rare bird, that's mysteriously appeared in several other stories, it is ultimately redemptive. And so I end my playlist with the iconic "Hallelujah" by Leonard Cohen, and to his memory I dedicate this. "There's a blaze of light in every word/ It doesn't matter which you heard/ The holy or the broken Hallelujah."


Jaimee Wriston Colbert and Wild Things links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

Booklist review
Tahoma Literary Review review

Binghamton Press & Sun-Bulletin profile of the author
Christine Sneed interview with the author
Eco-Fiction interview with the author
Fiction Writers Review interview with the author
Natural Bridge interview with the author
The Other Stories interview with the author
The Rumpus interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Tom Hanks' Forthcoming Short Story Collection, A List of Great Anti-Trump Songs, and more)

Tom Hanks' short story collection Uncommon Type will be published in October.


Rolling Stone listed great anti-Trump songs.


Stream a 1980 Sun Ra documentary.


Tin House shared new short fiction by Megan Giddings.


Ride shared the band's first new song in 20 years.


Publishers Weekly listed spring's most anticipated debut fiction.


Stream a new Hurray for the Riff Raff song.


Woody Woodmansey, author of Spider From Mars: My Life With David Bowie, shared his favorite Bowie songs (and their backstories) at The Quietus.


Stream a new Bonnie "Prince" Billy song.


John Darnielle talked to Time about his new novel Universal Harvester.

The Boston Globe reviewed the book.


Strand of Oaks shared covers of Stone Roses, Primal Scream, and Phish songs at Aquarium Drunkard.


Publishers Weekly interviewed author Daphne Merkin.


Stream a new Tim Kasher song.


Yiyun LI listed 14 books that changed her life at Read It Forward.


Tone Deaf listed lost pieces of music that should be released.


A lost Walt Whitman novel has been unearthed.


Stream a new Conor Oberst song.


The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America has announced its 2016 Nebula Award nominees.


Pénélope Bagieu talked to the A.V. Club about her graphic biography of Cass Elliott, California Dreamin'.


CarolineLeavittville interviewed author Dan Chaon about his new novel Ill Will.


Paste listed songs inspired by George Orwell's novel 1984.


The Guardian listed the top Hollywood novels.


Elbow's Guy Garvey gave Drowned in Sound a tour of Manchester.


VICE shared a new comic by Gabrielle Bell.


Paste ranked Ryan Adams' albums.


Wow! interviewed Jac Jemc about her blog Rejection Letters.


David Prowse of Japandroids played DJ at The Current.


Signature interviewed author Emma Richler.


Steam a new Spoon song.


Read It Forward shared an excerpt from Mariana Enriquez's short story collection Things We Lost in the Fire.


Pitchfork interviewed Greil Marcus about his new book, The History of Rock ‘n’ Roll in Ten Songs.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

I'm Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons
In Gratitude by Jenny Diski
Margaret the First by Danielle Dutton
Nashville Chrome by Rick Bass
Our Noise: The Story of Merge Records, the Indie Label That Got Big and Stayed Small
A Replacement Life by Boris Fishman

eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

The Master by Colm Toibin
Spill Simmer Falter Wither by Sara Baume



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists
Essential and Interesting Year-End 2016 Music Lists

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (recommended new books)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

February 21, 2017

Book Notes - Cara Hoffman "Running"

Running

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Cara Hoffman's Running is a starkly lyrical and unforgettable novel from a master storyteller.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Hoffman is fearless and trusting of her readers, and her precise prose captures the novel's many settings—Greece, Washington State, New York City—and her characters' feelings and actions, vividly."


In her own words, here is Cara Hoffman's Book Notes music playlist for her novel Running:



While working on Running, (and while working as a runner in Athens in the late 80s) I listened to The Smiths, Sean Macgowan, Blixa Bargeld, Mick Harvey, David Bowie, Nick Cave, Crime and the City Solution, a lot of IRA songs and Greek folk music. I think the ideal playlist to accompany this novel would simply be the David Bowie album Low played on constant repeat and you would need to stand up every several chapters, and shout along with the song Be My Wife. But for the sake of variety and historical accuracy I offer you the following. Please play it loud and pour yourself a drink.


All Must be Love - Crime and the City Solution
This is from the 1988 album Shine. I love the grit and longing of this song and the dark sexy intelligence of their music, it captures that era in Europe particularly well. I was a fan of The Birthday Party, but a lot of good came from their break up. Like Crime, and like The Bad Seeds.

Disorder – Joy Division
From their first album. They're from Salford, like the character Milo in Running. I love Ian Curtis's voice, the ring of his Mancunian accent. Like a lot of the music on this list, this is a song I remember hearing in bars.

Ask – The Smiths
This song is just good advice for everyone. Tender and funny.

Soul Desert - Blixa Bargeld
I loved Einstürzende Neubauten as a kid, and am fan of Blixa's Bargeld's solo work for its subtlety and restraint. He doesn't exactly scream in this song—but the scream is always there, barely audible beneath the surface.

5/4 - 3 teens kill 4
Hard to find any work by 3 teens kill 4, the band the artist David Wojnarowicz's played in during the 80s. This song is a slow burn collage of sound, similar to VU's Murder Mystery, but far more spare. Wojnarowicz speaks, sings and chants over hypnotic beats, samples, and simple guitar rifs. His voice is beautiful, low and rich.

USA –The Pogues
I felt for a long time this was my theme song. And it gets to the heart of the novel. “When I was young I chewed the leaves, when I was older I drank with thieves.” And the bleak lines “I found the things for which I prayed and came back home to the USA with a heart of stone, and now I know…” It has those driving drums from traditional Irish music, and Shane Macgowan's forthright snarl, and the story is about love and loneliness and about how, as Jasper Lethe put, “there's no way out.”

Sweet Thing/Candidate – David Bowie
This song from Diamond Dogs, has been one of my favorites since I was a teenager. The harmonies are unreal. (Bowie singing with Bowie singing with Bowie, that elegant open throated howl.) And these final lines are like a relentless anthem of cruising. Well on the street where you live I could not hold up my head for I put all I have in another bed, in the back of a car, in a cellar like a church with the door ajar, well I guess we must be looking for a different kind but we can't stop trying til we break up our mind, til the sun drips blood on the seedy young knights who press you to the ground while shaking in fright.

The Rocky Road to Dublin – The Pogues
I grew up on Irish music and listening to it still affects me deeply. The traditional lyrics are lovely, cutting thorns and bogs and rabbits and drinking and working and wandering, Shane McGowan's voice can make any song do what it's supposed to do. Sad, funny, hardboiled, clever, these are nursery songs to me.

From Her to Eternity – Nick Cave
A classic, people know mostly from Nick Cave's cameo in wings of desire. “One more song, and I'm not going to tell you about a girl, I'm not going to tell you about a girl.” I doubt there's a playlist I've made that doesn't have Nick Cave on it. I missed seeing him in Athens in 1990 when I was broke and working at a hotel. I saw him play four years ago, with my best friend (who had also worked as a runner back in the day.) It almost made up for missing him in Athens, and possibly made up for every other bad thing that happened in the years between those shows.

Come out ye Black and Tans – Wolfe Tones
This is a traditional IRA song. Brutal, sarcastic, rousing, historically accurate. Runners sing this in Drink's Time in the novel. More lullaby music. When I was a kid I was in love with a boy who had a poster of Bobby Sands in his bedroom. He was an altar boy and his parents were alcoholics, his father had a plaque with his name on it at the bar where he spent his time. They sent him to Belfast for marching season when he was thirteen. This is something maybe people who grew up in places like I did can understand. They can understand why a person would want to go to the other end of the world and not come back.


Cara Hoffman and Running links:

the author's website
Wikipedia entry for the author

Booklist review
Kirkus Reviews review
Publishers Weekly review

Largehearted Boy playlist by the author for Running
Salon interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Book Notes - Shannon Leone Fowler "Traveling with Ghosts"

Traveling with Ghosts

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Shannon Leone Fowler's memoir Traveling with Ghosts is a compelling and poignant book about love, grief, and recovery.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Fowler has turned her devastating, beautiful, honest, and personal story into something universal. Akin to Cheryl Strayed’s Wild (2012), her book will appeal to globetrotters and readers of hopeful stories chronicling grief and recovery."


In her own words, here is Shannon Leone Fowler's Book Notes music playlist for her memoir Traveling with Ghosts:



Traveling with Ghosts: A Memoir is about my fiancé, Sean. It’s about our relationship, his sudden death in 2002, and the solo journey I took through Eastern Europe in the months that followed. So it might seem strange to say, fourteen years later, that I had fun putting together this playlist. Now a single mum of three young kids, it wasn’t only that I could put on a great song from my younger days, turn it up, and tell myself I was working. It was more because I hadn’t realized what a huge role music had played in my relationship with Sean.

We’d grown up on other sides of the world—I’m from California and Sean was from Melbourne—so we first connected introducing each other to music. He got me into Powderfinger, and for a while I was known among his friends as the chick who turned him on to Ben Harper. We met backpacking through Western Europe, where Sean traveled with a Discman and tinny, portable travel speakers. We listened to music all the time together, especially in bed. We made each other mix tapes while we were apart, that we sent in the post. And after he died, I found meaning in the lyrics of almost every song.

I’ve stuck with the versions of the songs I used to listen to, as that’s where the memories are. Traveling with Ghosts bounces around a lot in time and place, which made it difficult to put the songs in any kind of order that would mirror the book. So I’ve kept the songs in the chronological order they appeared in my life.

“Castles Made of Sand,” The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Axis: Bold as Love

“And so castles made of sand, fall in the sea, eventually.”

There’s a scene in the book in Essaouira, Morocco where a local guide takes Sean and me by camel to see Hendrix’s inspiration for this song—an eighteenth century watchtower now sinking into the sea. It was February 1999; Sean and I had only just met. We were traveling with two other young Australian backpackers, and this was our first excursion just the two of us.

We later found out Hendrix had written the song two years before visiting Morocco. And after Sean died in the ocean—stung by a box jellyfish while we were vacationing in Thailand, the lyrics seemed to represent promises crumbling.

“Too Young to Die,” Jamiroquai, Emergency on Planet Earth

“To put this sad world right.
So don’t you worry,
Suffer no more,
‘Cos we’re too young to die.”

This song also features in a scene in Traveling with Ghosts—my twenty-fifth birthday, March 1999, with Sean in Bled, Slovenia. Sean had introduced me to Jamiroquai, and he bought me this CD for my birthday. We listened to the tracks as he cooked chicken satay, and as we drank cheap white wine out on the balcony. I later put the song on a mix tape I sent to him in Ireland. As with so many of the tracks on this list, the lyrics took on a different meaning for me after his death.

“My Happiness,” Powderfinger, Odyssey Number Five

“If you’re over there when I need you here.”

Powderfinger has always been my favorite of the bands Sean introduced me to. Their CD, Internationalist, was on heavy rotation as we traveled through Europe together in 1999. After that first trip, Sean and I had extended periods of long distance: I was teaching SCUBA in the Caribbean while he worked as a cook in Ireland, I studied Australian sea lions on Kangaroo Island while he worked for Cadbury-Schweppes in Melbourne, I was doing PhD course work in California while he taught marketing in China. This song is about the pain of long distance, and reminds me now of those much simpler times.

“New York, New York,” Ryan Adams, Gold

“Had myself a lover who was finer than gold
But I've been broken up and busted up since.
And love don't play any games with me, anymore
Like she did before.”

In late 2001, Sean and I listened to this album all the time. He bought me the CD for Christmas that year, the first and only Christmas I ever spent with his family.

Like many people, this particular track reminds me of 9/11. I was on Kangaroo Island that day, but had already booked a flight to visit Sean in Melbourne for the day after. I remember the stunned airport employees, and sitting with Sean watching the TV as the towers fell over and over and over.

I was supposed to fly out of Melbourne for a quick holiday on my own in Thailand. But they’d closed the airports soon after I’d landed and no one was sure when they would open again. My parents were panicking. But Sean was the one to talk me into canceling the trip. If I hadn’t, Sean and I would have almost certainly chosen a different country for our vacation a year later. And he’d still be alive.

“A holiday is not worth making your parents miserable,” he’d said. “Thailand will always be there. I’ll go with you.”

“Bubble Toes,” Jack Johnson, Brushfire Fairytales

“When you move like a jellyfish,
Rhythm don’t mean nothing”

In 2001 and 2002, I did many road trips between my field site on Kangaroo Island and Sean’s flat in Melbourne. My car was so old, it only had a tape deck and Brushfire Fairytales was often in it. During an early scene in the book, “Bubble Toes” is playing on the stereo when I first arrive on the island and am trying to find my way around in the dark.

After Sean’s death, more than once, someone tried to pull me up to dance to this song. Coming for me, grinning and waving their arms around like a jellyfish. These lyrics, that new Bridget Jones novel, an old episode of Friends—jellyfish suddenly seemed to be everywhere, inescapable.

“Don’t Forget Me,” Red Hot Chili Peppers, By the Way

“I’m an ocean in your bedroom.”

Sean and I had tickets to see the Red Hot Chili Peppers together in Melbourne on December 1, 2002. I went to visit him in China in July, and we bought By the Way, gearing up for the concert. We’d go to karaoke with his students, and he’d almost always pick a Pepper’s song, "Scar Tissue" or "Breaking the Girl." When Sean died August 9th, these tickets somehow seemed to be yet another piece of evidence that his death was a mistake.

“Mr. Jones,” Counting Crows, August and Everything After

“Help me believe in anything”

This song is the last song Sean ever heard, as we danced together barefoot up and down Haad Rin Nok beach on Ko Pha Ngan island. It’s haunted me ever since. Decades after it’s release, “Mr. Jones” still appears to be a favorite for bar and restaurant playlists all over the world. It actually came on last night, while I was out with a couple of other single mums at the Balham Arms in London, and immediately after they’d asked about my upcoming book.

I never really noticed the album title until I started writing this piece. Since Sean died in August and the book starts there, August and Everything After could have been the title of my memoir.

“Walk Away,” Ben Harper, Welcome to the Cruel World

“Oh no, here comes that sun again
That means another day
Without you my friend.
And it hurts me
To look into the mirror at myself”

Sean and I listened to a lot of Ben Harper. He’d always ask me to put on “the dancing song” before jiggling around to "Homeless Child," as he does at one point in Salamanca, Spain in Traveling with Ghosts.

The day after he died on Ko Pha Ngan, I woke up and "Walk Away’s" opening lyrics (above) got stuck in my head and stayed there for days. I was dealing with the police, his insurance, his family, and the Australian consulate—trying to get his body released and off the island, and these words became the sound track only I could hear.

“In My Life,” The Beatles, Rubber Soul

“In my life, I love you more.”

Sean always referred to The Beatles as “The Boys.” Every mix tape he made would have at least one of their songs. His father, a friend, and I chose the music for Sean’s funeral and there was no question that there would be a couple of Beatles’ songs played. “But of all these friends and lovers / There is no one compares with you / And these memories lose their meaning / When I think of love as something new.”

“Don’t Dream It’s Over,” Crowded House, Crowded House

“But you'll never see the end of the road
While you're traveling with me
Hey now, hey now
Don’t dream it’s over.”

Crowded House was formed in Melbourne in 1985, and I don’t know that I’ve met an Aussie of my generation, certainly not a Melbournian, who didn’t have a strong sense of attachment and pride associated with the band. Sean also had some story he and his mates thought was hilarious about how drunk he got at his first ever gig, watching Crowded House play. This song as well was played at his funeral.

“Say Hello, Wave Goodbye,” David Gray, White Ladder

“Take a look at my face
For the last time.”

One last track played at his funeral, and another song that has continued to haunt me for years after. Recently, I took an overnight trip to Bournemouth on the UK’s south coast to try to write an essay related to Traveling with Ghosts, about how my relationship with the ocean has changed since Sean’s death. I was having dinner alone at Urban Reef—oysters and risotto and wine. It would be Sean’s fortieth birthday the next day, had been fourteen years since he died. The white lights above me shaped like life-rings, and this song came on to the stereo.

“Goodbye,” Patty Griffin, Flaming Red

“And I wonder where you are
And if the pain ends when you die
And I wonder if there was
Some better way to say goodbye
Today my heart is big and sore
It's tryin' to push right through my skin
I won't see you anymore
I guess that's finally sinkin' in.”

After Sean’s funeral in Melbourne, I returned briefly to California before running away to Eastern Europe. My mum owned this album, and every single time we were in the car together that month in September 2002, I played this song over and over again. The lyrics, and the ache in Griffin’s voice, spoke to me in a way nothing else was able to at the time.

“Summertime,” Janis Joplin, Janis Joplin’s Greatest Hits

“No, no, no, no, don't you cry”

This is from a scene in the book, not long after I arrived in Eastern Europe. The night before Sean’s birthday again, but back in 2002, when he should have been turning twenty-six and had been dead only eleven weeks. I was sitting alone in a smoky café in Sopron, Hungary, surrounded by couples and shivering in my winter coat because of the icy draught by the door. The band playing Summertime, though it took me a while to recognize it through their thick Hungarian accents. Everything just felt wrong, and I had no idea what I was doing there.

“Hejnał Mariacki (The Cracow Bugle-call)”, Marek Skwarczynski

I first heard the Hejnał Mariacki, or St Mary’s Dawn, in Kraków, Poland on November 1, 2002. It’s played every hour on the hour by a single trumpeter in the highest tower of Kościół Mariacki, or St. Mary’s Church.

Local legend tells that early one morning in 1241, a lone guard spied approaching Tatar forces. Playing the Hejnał on his trumpet, he woke the residents in time to defend the city. Even as an arrow pierced his throat, and the warning was stopped short.

This song—five simple, direct, drawn-out notes still cut short today—started a shift in the way I was traveling through Eastern Europe. I began to pay attention to the histories of the scarred landscapes, and to the stories of the people left behind.

“All the Things She Said,” t.A.T.u., 200 km/h in the Wrong Lane

“I keep asking myself, wondering how
I keep closing my eyes but I can't block you out”

This song is all about time and place for me. More than any other track, it brings me back to Eastern Europe that winter of 2002. I traveled alone though Hungary, Slovakia, Poland, Croatia, Bosnia, Romania, Bulgaria. It was the same handful of songs playing everywhere, but this was the only one from the Eastern Bloc. The girls’ repetition of the chorus, “Running through my head / Running through my head / Running through my head” matched my own mental state at the time.

“The Scientist,” Coldplay, A Rush of Blood to the Head

“Tell me you love me
Come back and haunt me.”

“The Scientist” was another song on heavy rotation that winter. I heard the track throughout my travels—A Rush of Blood to the Head is playing at The Bar in Sarajevo in the book. But I didn’t see the video until I got to Sofia, Bulgaria at the very end of my journey. I remember stopping, frozen, in the hostel lobby and staring at the TV when I saw his dead lover come back through the car’s windshield. Since Traveling with Ghosts ends with Sean and me leaving Shànghăi, about to fly to Thailand, this feels like the song to end on. “Oh, take me back to the start.”


Shannon Leone Fowler and Traveling with Ghosts links:

excerpt from the book

Booklist review
Kirkus Reviews review
Publishers Weekly review
USA Today review

Santa Cruz Sentinel profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

List of Online "Best Books of 2016" Lists

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

100 Online Sources for Free and Legal Music Downloads
Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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