May 1, 2018

Shorties (May's Best Books, An Interview with Speedy Ortiz's Sadie Dupuis, and more)

Helen DeWitt

Literary Hub, Signature, and Vanity Fair recommended May's best books.


Stereogum profiled Speedy Ortiz's Sadie Dupuis.


Vulture shared an excerpt from Zora Neale Hurston’s previously unpublished book Barracoon.


Bedouine played a Tiny Desk Concert.


Kevin Brockmeier delved into the writing of Donald Harington at the Oxford American.


Pitchfork reconsidered Captain Beefheart's classic album Trout Mask Replica.


Curtis Sittenfeld discussed her first story collection, You Think It, I’ll Say It, with Aspen Public Radio.


Stream a new Parquet Courts song.


The Guardian shared xTx's essay from the anthology Not That Bad (edited by Roxane Gay).


Paste recapped April's best albums.


The Guardian Books podcast interviewed author Aminatta Forna.


Zadie Smith on photographer Deana Lawson.


Rick Bragg talked to the New Orleans Advocate about his book The Best Cook in the World: Tales from My Momma's Table.


Paste recommended young NYC bands.


Literary Hub ranked fictional writers.


Gorilla Vs. Bear shared a mix of April's best music.


Book Riot recommended fairy tale retellings.


Gambit profiled Hiss Golden Messenger's M. C. Taylor.


Leslie Jamison discussed her memoir with the Los Angeles Review of Books.


Mark Kozelek interviewed singer-songwriter Phoebe Bridgers.


Signature interviewed Melissa Broder about her debut novel The Pisces.


Stereogum reconsidered Santogold's debut album on its 10th anniversary.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Lucas Mann's new book Captive Audience: On Love and Reality TV.


Noisey and The Muse interviewed Liz Phair.


CrimeReads recommended activist crime novels.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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April 30, 2018

Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar's Playlist for Her Novel "The Map of Salt and Stars"

The Map of Salt and Stars

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar's novel The Map of Salt and Stars is an ambitious and moving debut.

Booklist wrote of the book:

"Nour’s family constantly endures hardship. . . but her young, honest voice adds a softer, coming-of-age perspective to this story of loss, hope, and survival. . . This imaginative yet very real look into war-torn Syria is a must."


In her own words, here is Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar's Book Notes music playlist for her debut novel The Map of Salt and Stars:



When I started writing The Map of Salt and Stars, I wanted to write about the things we take with us when we are forced to redefine home—our memories, our heritage, our language, our maps both internal and external, and our music. Joy, in times of trauma or oppression or violence, is a form of resistance, and music is a conduit to the creative expression of joy. So to make music is also to resist trauma. To sing is to resist sorrow. To dance with either the body or the spirit is to say to the oppressor, “I’m not dead yet.”

Poetry is central to The Map of Salt and Stars, which is fitting because Syria, the place my father was born, has a rich poetic and musical tradition. The first poems were songs written down. What is poetry, then, but the music of the human heart made visible? This is the reason my characters write poems, sing songs, and dance with each other: to resist pain, to remind themselves that the world can be a beautiful place again, to remind themselves that their voices still exist even if the world closes its ears.

Umm Kulthum / Enta Omri (You Are My Life)
Translating Arabic music and poetry can be difficult, because many words in Arabic have multiple meanings that give each phrase a multiplicity of textures and interpretations. Enta Omri, sung by Egyptian singer Umm Kulthum—widely regarded as the most revered Arab singer in history—is no exception to this, and that is why I love it. I would be hard-pressed to find an Arab who didn’t appreciate or at least know Umm Kulthum’s music. She’s an icon. In The Map of Salt and Stars, the protagonist’s parents dance to this song in their apartment in New York City. I remember listening to it in my family’s studio apartment when I was growing up in Manhattan, still unable to speak much Arabic but straining for the meaning behind the rich floodwaters of Umm Kulthum’s voice. This song contains what I feel is the most romantic line found in any song, translated into English as: “You are my life, whose morning began with your light.” Name a line more gorgeous than that.

Naughty Boy, Sam Smith / La La La
Here, a boy turns his back on trauma by finding chosen family and singing to drown out the words of those who hurt him. Songs, like stories, can support us when we are overwhelmed and in pain. They can call us back to ourselves. In The Map of Salt and Stars, the protagonist, Nour, tells herself a story to give her strength when her family loses their home. Some songs we sing to ourselves in celebration, but others we sing to ourselves when we are afraid, like prayers.

Tom Day / Going Home
I wrote the final two chapters of the book to this song on loop, as its unassuming beginning gives way to a steady build of pressure that is eventually released in what feels to me like a claiming of strength. Incidentally, there was supposed to be another poem at the end of the novel that described what home meant to Nour, but after I drafted it, I realized that a concept like home was not only impossible to put into words, but that it would be unfair to give the reader a definition of home when the whole point of the novel was to allow the reader, like Nour, to come to their own conclusions of what home means. So just as the reader is allowed to imagine what they might include in such a poem, so, too, this song about home—and finally reaching it—is fittingly wordless.

Naseer Shamma / Al-‘Iraq ‘ala Maqam Wahid (Iraq in a Single Maqam)
The oud is a lute-like traditional Middle Eastern and North African instrument. Naseer Shamma is a reknowned Iraqi Kurdish musician and oud player who trained in Baghdad. Much of his music is tied to poetry or played alongside poetry. A maqam is a type of melody and an improvisational technique. Just as with the music of Umm Kulthum, I often wrote to a soundtrack of traditional Arabic-language music and wordless instrumental music from the Levant and North Africa. I wanted to mix traditional musical forms and more modern forms, as well as both English- and Arabic-language music, in my own mind while I was writing, because this reflected the reality of my protagonist’s (and my own) Arab American identity.

Kiran Ahluwalia / Saffar (Journey)
The word saffar means journey in multiple languages, including Arabic. Everything in life is a journey, but it is harder to think of a traumatic journey (like a refugee flight, exile, forced displacement, or homelessness) as a journey. Nour, the protagonist of The Map of Salt and Stars, struggles to redefine home so that she can take something of it with her, regardless of whether she will ever be able to return. In this novel, I wanted to explore the question: in what ways is it possible for those of us who have lost home(s) to both grieve what the journey has cost us as well as to celebrate what cannot be taken away?

M.I.A. / Borders
Refugees fleeing violence and displacement face cruel borders at every turn. I see this in America in the form of the Muslim Ban, which prevents innocent people not so different from me from entering my country and finding safety. There is a nonsensical violence to this. This novel gave me an opportunity to reflect on the ways in which borders, particularly in the ways they are drawn and enforced, can be violent institutions used to further marginalize refugees, migrants, people of color (particularly Black folks), the disabled, those who are economically disadvantaged, and religious and ethnic minorities, for whom borders are differentially enforced.

Bombay Bicycle Club / Home By Now
The official music video for this song—a kids’ theater production of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey—has always intrigued me, in part because it speaks to the ways that children are more than capable of feeling complex emotions like loneliness, grief, and an awareness of their own mortality, something adults tend to forget as they grow older. In writing a story about a twelve-year-old coming to terms with loss, displacement, violence, and the loss of family, this song felt particularly relevant. When we are children, we feel the same things as when we are adults, but we often lack the words to communicate our emotions, so they feel closer, more insistent, more vivid. So much of the writing of this novel involved attempting to return to that state of emotional permeability, remembering how it feels to experience trauma as a child, with all the vulnerability we feel as kids. Music helped to return me to that state of emotional openness, including openness to deep and wordless pain—as well as joy.

Fairouz / Bektoub Esmak Ya Habibi (I’m Writing Your Name, My Darling)
I close this playlist with a beloved Lebanese singer, Fairouz, and a song about love. In this song, the singer is lamenting that her love is constant while her lover’s is not, that her love will outlast theirs. Loving a place one has left behind can sometimes feel like that: I will love this place and its people forever, but will this place and these people remember me? In our hearts, everything lives forever just the way we remember it, and sometimes that is both a balm and a wound.

Still, to sing is to tell a story, and to tell stories is to bear witness to the joy and the pain of what happened, of what we saw, of what we lived. This is the gift at the heart of music and of storytelling: the refusal to forget.


Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar and The Map of Salt and Stars links:

the author's website

BookPage review
Kirkus review


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

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Shorties (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie Profiled, Courtney Barnett on Books, and more)

Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

The Guardian profiled author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.


Courtney Barnett talked books with the Los Angeles Review of Books.


April's best eBook deals.


The Cut profiled Liz Phair.


Mary H.K. Choi talked to Weekend Edition about her debut novel, Emergency Contact.


Stream a new Mogwai song.


Ploughshares interviewed author Sandra Cisneros.


Lord Huron visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Curtis Sittenfeld recommended books with strong female protagonists at The Week.


The Oregonian shared a playlist of songs that capture Oregon's scenes and moods.


Crime writers recommended crime novels at the Guardian.


The Quietus reconsidered AC/DC's Powerage album on its 40th anniversary.


GQ shared an essay by Michael Chabon.


Bob Dylan is launching a line of signature whiskeys.


The Raleigh News & Observer recommended children's books with strong women characters.


Stream a short film featuring Alina Simone and Amanda Palmer.


The Guardian interviewed author Amy Bloom.


Superchunk visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


The Millions recommended fiction about Mars.


Pitchfork reconsidered Built To Spill's 1997 album Perfect from Now on.


The Creative Independent interviewed author Jenny Zhang.


Stereogum reconsidered Portishead's Third album on its 10th anniversary.


Book Riot recommended Pride and Prejudice retellings for all ages.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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April 27, 2018

This Week's Interesting Music Releases - April 27, 2018

Speedy Ortiz

Speedy Ortiz's Twerp Verse is Sadie Dupuis's most personal and political album yet.

DMA's' For Now, Grouper's Grid Of Points, Half Waif's Lavender, and Okkervil River's In The Rainbow Rain are other new releases I can recommend.

Reissues include a vinyl edition of David Bowie's Aladdin Sane for its 45th anniversary.


This week's interesting music releases:


The Beat Escape: Life Is Short The Answer's Long Due
Ben Frost: All That You Love Will Be Eviscerated [vinyl]
Blue Oyster Cult: On Your Feet or on Your Knees (translucent blue vinyl) (reissue) [vinyl]
Cranberries: No Need To Argue (clear & pink vinyl) (reissue) [vinyl]
David Bowie: Aladdin Sane (45th anniversary edition) (reissue) [vinyl]
DMA's: For Now
Dr. Dog: Critical Equation
Forth Wanderers: Forth Wanderers
Grouper: Grid Of Points
Godsmack: When Legends Rise
Half Waif: Lavender
Human League: Secrets (remastered and expanded)
Janelle Monáe: Dirty Computer
Jean Grae & Quelle Chris: Everything's Fine
Johnny Cash: The Rough Guide to Johnny Cash [vinyl]
Marillion: Tumbling Down the Years
Marillion: Unplugged At The Walls
Massive Attack: Heligoland (reissue) [vinyl]
Nick Cave & Warren Ellis: Kings (soundtrack)
Okkervil River: In The Rainbow Rain
Post Malone: beerbongs & bentleys
Red Wanting Blue:
Soundgarden: In & Out of the Cage (reissue) [vinyl]
Speedy Ortiz: Twerp Verse
Twin Shadow: Caer
Van Morrison and Joey DeFrancesco: You're Driving Me Crazy
Various Artists: Fab Gear: British Beat Explosion & Its Aftershocks 1963-1967 (6-CD box set)
Various Artists: Jesus Christ Superstar Live in Concert Original Soundtrack of the NBC Television Event
Various Artists: The Lost Boys - Original Soundtrack Recording (red vinyl) (reissue) [vinyl]
Webb Wilder: Powerful Stuff
Willie Nelson: Last Man Standing


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

weekly music release lists

Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily book and music news and links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)

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Shorties (Desmond Elliott Prize Shortlist, A New Essay by Julien Baker, and more)

How to Be Human

The 2018 Desmond Elliott prize (for debut novels) shortlist has been announced.

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman
How to Be Human by Paula Cocozza
We That Are Young by Preti Taneja


The Oxford American shared a new essay by Julien Baker.


April's best eBook deals.


The Quietus recommended April's best albums.


Alexander Chee discussed his new essay collection How to Write an Autobiographical Novel with Interview magazine.


Stream a new Illuminati Hotties song.


eBooks on sale for $4.99 today:

Brain on Fire by Susanah Cahalan.


Pitchfork profiled singer-songwriter John Prine.


Tin House interviewed author Rita Bullwinkel.


Stream a new Snail Mail song.


The Weird Fiction Review interviewed author Dempow Torishima, and shared an excerpt from his book Sisyphean.


Aquarium Drunkard recommended recent Bandcamp releases.


Sarah Perry shared her struggle to become a writer at the Guardian.


Khruangbin visited The Current studio for a live performance and interview.


The Guardian profiled comics writer Frank Miller.


Stream a new song by Yours Are the Only Ears.


The 2018 Eisner Award nominations have been announced.


Paste recommended April's best vinyl releases.


Hope Larson discussed her new graphic novel All Summer Long with Publishers Weekly.


Stream a new Oneohtrix Point Never song.


Bookworm interviewed poet Carol Muske-Dukes.


The Paris Review interviewed author Sheila Heti.


Celeste Ng recommended books to buy on Independent Bookstore Day at Bustle.

Literary Hub and Book Riot interviewed Ng.


Stream a new song by Lowly.


The Rumpus shared an excerpt from Lee Martin's forthcoming novel The Mutual UFO Network.


Liz Harris discussed the new Grouper album with Pitchfork.


Elif Batuman talked books and reading with the Guardian.


Stream a new song by the Golden Dawn Arkestra.


The Rumpus interviewed poet Kiki Petrosino.


Noisey recommended entry points into Yeah Yeah Yeahs' discography.


Olivia Laing shared her love for Derek Jarman’s book Modern Nature at the Guardian.


Signature recommended books by Robert Graves.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

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April 26, 2018

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - April 26, 2018

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics.

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores.


Love That Bunch

Love That Bunch by Aline Kominsky-Crumb

Collecting comics from the 1970s through today, Love That Bunch is shockingly prescient while still being an authentic story of its era. Kominsky-Crumb was ahead of her time in juxtaposing the contradictory nature of female sexuality with a proud, complicated feminism.


How to Write An Autobiographical Novel

How to Write An Autobiographical Novel by Alexander Chee

Eloquent and economical, Alexander Chee's writing is as good as it gets. A memoir about coming of age and finding his vocation, it is written with raw truth and lived wisdom.


Wade in the Water

Wade in the Water by Tracy K. Smith

New book of poetry by the 22nd Poet Laureate of the US, ambitiously weaving 250 years of black experience in America. She filters a chorus of voices from the past and present, near and far, using archival documents and testimonies.


Jonny Appleseed

Jonny Appleseed by Joshua Whitehead

This is the first novel from the poet of Full-metal indigiqueer. The story follows a self-proclaimed NDN glitter princess the week before a family funeral. We spend the following seven days with our beautiful and powerful big city hero as he reflects back to his residential home and family.


Vzszhhzz

Vzszhhzz by Jeanne Graff

This small book is a twenty-first-century document on cosmopolitan travelers like artists, lawyers, restauranteurs, philosophers, wine-makers, and boxers - it is about how their lives intersect in unintended ways. It's look into the unglamourous glamour of the energetic dreamers we hold high.


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly links:

Librairie Drawn & Quarterly's blog
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Facebook page
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Tumblr
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly on Twitter


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

other Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly new comics and graphic novel highlights)
Book Notes (authors create music playlists for their book)
guest book reviews
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
WORD Bookstores Books of the Week (weekly new book highlights)

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Shorties (Patton Oswalt on the Golden State Killer and His Wife's Book That Searched for the Man, Prince Anecdotes from His Manager's Memoir, and more)

Tragedy Queens: Stories Inspired by Lana Del Rey & Sylvia Plath

Patton Oswalt talked to the New York Times about his wife's book, I'll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman's Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer.


Entertainment Weekly shared Prince anecdotes from Owen Husney's memoir Famous People Who've Met Me.


April's best eBook deals.


NPR Music is streaming the new Shakey Graves album, Can't Wake Up.


The Village Voice interviewed author Kevin Young.


Talking Heads’ Chris Frantz will publish a memoir in 2020.


eBooks on sale for $1.99 today:

The Last Days of Café Leila by Donia Bijan
The Famished Road by Ben Okri


Stream a new Stephen Malkmus song that features Kim Gordon.


Melissa Broder talked to Philadelphia Weekly about her new novel The Pisces.

BuzzFeed shared an excerpt from the book.


The Quietus and Bandcamp recommended April's best music on cassette.


Jeremy C. Shipp discussed his novel The Atrocities with Vol. 1 Brooklyn.


NPR Music is streaming Belly's first album in 23 years, DOVE.


Jamel Brinkley talked to Craft Literary about his short story collection A Lucky Man.


Drowned in Sound interviewed Half Waif's Nandi Rose Plunkett.


Economist Dambisa Moyo talked books and reading with the New York Times.


NPR Music is streaming the new album by Venetian Snares and Daniel Lanois.


Financial Times interviewed author Leïla Slimani.


Bedouine visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


The A.V. Club shared an excerpt from Hope Larson's graphic novel All Summer Long.


PopMatters recommended Tom Waits songs.


Clotilde Dusoulier discussed her cookbook Tasting Paris with Signature.


The Nels Cline 4 played an in-studio set at Paste.


The Literary Hub podcast talked to author Susan Orlean.


The Chicago Reader examined the enduring songs of the Wobblies movement.


Tobias Carroll examined literary works inspired by Van Morrison at Literary Hub.


Stream a new CHVRCHES song.


Book Riot shared a beginner's guide to cyberpunk.


Japanese Breakfast covered the Cranberries' "Dream."


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author Natalia Sylvester.


Stream a new song by Hatchie.


Entropy interviewed poet Jacob Saenz.


Stream a new SASAMI song.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 25, 2018

Shorties (An Anthology of Stories Inspired by Lana Del Rey & Sylvia Plath, Charlotte Gainsbourg's Favorite Albums, and more)

Tragedy Queens: Stories Inspired by Lana Del Rey & Sylvia Plath

The contributors and editor of the anthology Tragedy Queens: Stories Inspired by Lana Del Rey & Sylvia Plath talked to Luna Luna Magazine Tragedy Queens: Stories Inspired by Lana Del Rey & Sylvia Plath about the project.


Charlotte Gainsbourg discussed her favorite albums at The Quietus.


April's best eBook deals.


Stream a new song by Petal.


Vol. 1 Brooklyn shared an excerpt from Laura Catherine Brown's novel Made by Mary.


Drowned in Sound profiled the band Hinds.


Kevin Young talked to Morning Edition about his new poetry collection, Brown.


Stream a new Phil Cook song that features Amelia Meath.


Kate Greathead discussed her debut novel Laura & Emma with Entertainment Weekly.


Calexico visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Andrew Sean Greer talked to Esquire about his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Less.


Stream two new She & Him songs.


Food52 recommended cookbook shops from around the world.


Superorganism played a Tiny Desk Concert.


Ibrahim Nasrallah's novel The Second War of the Dog has been awarded the International prize for Arabic fiction.


Stream a new song by The Rock*A*Teens.


The Rumpus interviewed 2018 National Bookstore Day Ambassador Celeste Ng.


The Key is streaming Dr. Dog's new album Critical Equation.


The Paris Review shared an excerpt (and recipe for pecan pie) from Rick Bragg's book The Best Cook in the World: Tales from My Momma's Table.


Hop Along visited World Cafe for an interview and live performance.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Elizabeth Winthrop's novel, The Mercy Seat.


The Mountain Goats Banter is my current favorite Tumblr.


Electric Literature recommended short books to read on your commute.


Stream a new song by Joan of Arc.


UPROXX recommended folk albums you might have missed this year.


LitReactor listed the best Shakespeare film adaptations.


Stream a new Pllush song.


Laura Veirs discussed her album The Lookout with Exclaim.


LitReactor features an Excerpt from Chuck Palahniuk's forthcoming novel Adjustment Day.


Stereogum interviewed the musical duo Beach House.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 24, 2018

Joe Donnelly's Playlist for His Essay Collection "L.A. Man"

L.A. Man

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Joe Donnelly's book L.A. Man collects his profiles of Wes Anderson, Werner Herzog, and others who have shaped our culture.


In his own words, here is Joe Donnelly's Book Notes music playlist for his essay collection L.A. Man:



During the question and answer section of readings, inevitably someone asks me how or why I became I writer. It's a simple question with no simple answer, but I often reply that the reason is in part, at least, that I didn't have the guts to follow through on my first desire: to be in a band. I've been in a band or two, or half, but never made the commitment to really try to make a life out of my first love, music. It just seemed too bold a quest, but one I often wish I had tried a bit harder at when it was time to try (though my ski-town band did get paid $300 a for a regular gig at a local waterhole popular with the women's softball league... we typically ended up in the red after the bar tab was settled.). Music and story, though, have been in my ears forever and I hope they will be until the end.

For L.A. Man, a collection and a bit of a retrospective, I'll try not to be bound by the time and place, but rather what comes to mind now when I recall scenes from those encounters.

"Driving Wes Anderson"
For this piece, Wes Anderson and I drove to Texas while Rushmore was premiering on both coasts. If someone filmed the drive, it might have played more Rich Linklater than Wes Anderson--lots of talking, lots of silence, lots of insinuation, broken up with reports coming in from both coasts as we traveled into the interior. American Analog Set's The Fun of Watching Fireworks is what I think of. It's such great driving music. It's unobtrusive but entirely engaging. Perfect for watching the country and your youth move into the rearview mirror. You need the whole album.

"Morning Becomes Electra"
The conceit of this 1997 profile was a "date" with Carmen Electra. For some reason Madonna's "Who's That Girl?" It's cute and bubbly like she was, but sly also. Also, weirdly, she's the subject in this collection, I feel like I got to know the least.

"Lou Reed Laughs Last"
Though this was a pretty upbeat encounter, we talked a lot about Berlin and The Blue Mask. Reed liked to needle our comfort zones and while "The Blue Mask" might be one of the most transgressive rock songs ever, I'm going with "The Kids" from Berlin because it is the bleakest pop song ever recorded... and it's beautiful.

"The Birth of the Now"
Picking a song to go with this (arguably... but not really) definitive piece on Dogtown and Zboys was easy. "Search and Destroy" by Iggy and the Stooges. I might just be echoing Stacy Peralta's documentary, but it's still the right choice.

"Understanding Craig Stecyk"
Craig is a seminal L.A. artist, cultural historian and raconteur. The Zboys were in many ways just another of his conceptual art pieces. The Beach Boys' "Sloop John B" comes immediately to mind.

"The Malloy Brothers' Conspiracy"
These guys surfed like gods, behaved like gentleman, bonded like the brothers-in-arms and, for awhile, made art-damaged, eco-conscious, retro surf movies that harkened back to surfers as watermen and stewards. I'm ripping Beta Band's "Needles in My Eyes" from their 2004 film Brokedown Melody.

"Who's That Girl?"
Oh, maybe that's why the Madonna song was in my head. But for this piece on the amazing comedian and performance artist Lauren Weedman I'm going with the Door's "L.A. Woman" because in many ways she's the quintessential L.A. Woman: fierce, funny, blonde, and from Indiana.

"Christian Bale and the Art of Extreme Acting"
Okay, here's where we go with Lou Reed's "The Blue Mask." Forget American Psycho, or Batman, have you ever seen The Machinist? He goes the distance.

"Sean Penn, With His Own Two Eyes"
Perhaps hitting the nail to squarely on the head, I immediately go to the Clash's "Clampdown."

"Fucking With Drew Barrymore"
At the time I did this piece, she was really going for it, producing a blockbuster franchise with girl-power subtext, stretching out as an actor and director and working on herself as a lifelong project, managing to be sun-kissed despite all the damage she'd endured. Joni Mitchell's "California" comes to mind.

"Monster Out of the Box, a Sandow Birk Omnibus"
For this piece on fearless artist Sandow Birk, I'm going with the Stones' "Street Fighting Man." The song is both rebellious and resigned and I think there's an element of that in Birk's art.

"What's Wrong With Wes Anderson"
We caught up ten years after the road trip to Texas and he seemed weary. The National's "Fake Empire" comes to mind mostly because it reminds me of smoking cigarettes and being lonely and I was doing a lot of that then. I sometimes think this piece was more reflective of my state of mind at the time than Anderson's.

"Into The Wilde"
Olivia Wilde was active in Haiti following the devastating 2010 earthquake. Bob Marley wrote "Get Up, Stand Up" after witnessing the poverty in Haiti in the early '70s. The song remains the same.

"The Pirate of Penance"
For this epic tale about Eddie Padilla, an original member of the Brotherhood of Eternal Love who escaped from the notorious Lurigancho Prison in Peru, I recommend the Grateful Dead's "Estimated Prophet."

"Lone Wolf"
This story about OR7, the wolf who went on an odyssey to reclaim lands and history that had been sacked by Manifest Destiny the choice is pretty obvious, Los Lobos's "How Will The Wolf Survive?"

"The Farewell Tour"
Another road trip tale, this one with my dying dad. I'm going with one of his favorites, The Moody Blues "Lovely To See You." Put it on and then tell me The Moody Blues aren't great.

"Werner Herzog in Los Angeles"
Terrence Trent D'Arby "Wishing Well."
It's funky, optimistic and sprockets-y at the same time. I like to imagine Herzog doing this at a karaoke bar.


Joe Donnelly and L.A. Man links:

the author's website
excerpt from the book

LA Weekly interview with the author
Quaker Campus profile of the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

Shorties (Recommended Summer Reading, Beach House on Their New Album, and more)

Beach House

Publishers Weekly recommended summer reading.


Musical duo Beach House discussed their new album 7 with Pitchfork.


April's best eBook deals.


Jenn Champion covered "Owner of a Lonely Heart" by Yes.


Joshua Wheeler discussed his essay collection, Acid West, with Vol. 1 Brooklyn.


Phoebe Bridgers visited The Current studio for an interview and live performance.


Fresh Air interviewed Gregory Pardlo about his memoir Air Traffic.


eBook on sale for $2.99 today:

Mort(e) by Robert Repino


Stream a new Cheekface song.


Bustle recommended books to read if you love advice columns.


Consequence of Sound listed St. Vincent's favorite books.


Paste recommended April's best books.


David Bowie-inspired food and drink.


The OTHERPPL podcast interviewed author Elle Nash.


Stream a new Ty Segall song.


Curtis Sittenfeld talked books and reading with Literary Hub.


BuzzFeed listed the best soundtracks and scores of all time.


The Los Angeles Review of Books interviewed author Celeste Ng.

"Very often, women in fiction are held up as either bitter enemies or as complete BFFs. Neither of those portrayals is very complicated, very interesting, or very true. Much more common — and to my mind, interesting — is the middle ground, in which we find ourselves both drawn to and troubled by another person. And actually, we’re often most intrigued by people who seem to be living the lives we ourselves turned down or missed out on. That push and pull isn’t often seen in fiction, and I think it should be."


Stream a new Shilpa Ray song.


The Rumpus interviewed poet Shara Lessley.


BrooklynVegan examined the intersection of Archie comics and indie rock.


Joe Gross discussed his new 33 1/3 book on Fugazi's In on the Kill Taker album with Washington City Paper.


Stream a new Colin Stetson song.


BookPage interviewed poet Aimee Nezhukumatathil.


The Riverfront Times profiled the band Alvvays.

On Antisocialites, the influences peep through on occasion. There are lyrical nods to Jonathan Richman and musical nods to the Primitives and Talulah Gosh, but these are merely window dressings to a truly compelling set of songs.


Poets & Writers interviewed author Alexander Chee.


Stream a new Post Louis song.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 23, 2018

Shorties (The Women's Prize for Fiction Shortlist, New Music from Fiona Apple, and more)

Home Fire

The shortlist for the 2018 Women's Prize for fiction has been announced:

Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie
The Idiot by Elif Batuman
The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar
Sight by Jessie Greengrass
Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward
When I Hit You: Or, A Portrait of the Writer as a Young Wife by Meena Kandasamy


Stream a new Fiona Apple song.


April's best eBook deals.


Literary Hub shared an excerpt from Elle Nash’s novel Animals Eat Each Other.


NPR Music is streaming Willie Nelson's new album Last Man Standing.


Richard Powers talked to Literary Hub and the Chicago Review of Books about his new novel The Overstory.


Stream a new Yukon Blonde song.


eBooks on sale for $2.99 today:

Among Others by Jo Walton
The Fishermen by Chigozie Obioma
The Moth edited by Catherine Burns


Drowned in Sound reconsidered Frightened Rabbit's album, The Midnight Organ Fight, now ten years old.


Nigella Lawson discussed her new cookbook At My Table with Morning Edition.


Stream a new song by Mitski & Xiu Xiu.


The Guardian profiled author Hanya Yanagihara.


All Things Considered examined the symphonies of Arvo Part.


Robert Coover talked to the New Yorker about his story in this week's issue.


Bleachers and St. Vincent covered Depeche Mode's "Just Can’t Get Enough."


The Guardian profiled author Willy Vlautin.


Juliana Hatfield talked to Morning Edition about her album, Juliana Hatfield Sings Olivia Newton-John.


The New Yorker profiled author Rachel Kushner.


Katie Dey covered Blonde Redhead's "Dr. Strangeluv."


Olivia Sudjic recommended books on breaking internet addiction at the Guardian.


Stream a new Eleanor Friedberger song.


The Guardian interviewed author Curtis Sittenfeld.


Stream a new song by Scarlet Johanssen and Pete Yorn.


Document shared a conversations between authors Édouard Louis and Zadie Smith.


Stream a new Belly song.


The Guardian shared an excerpt from Leslie Jamison's memoir The Recovering.


Pitchfork profiled former Crystal Castles frontwoman Alice Glass.


Publishers Weekly interviewed author Sheila Heti.



also at Largehearted Boy:

Support Largehearted Boy

previous Shorties posts (daily news and links from the worlds of music, books, and pop culture)

Atomic Books Comics Preview (the week's best new comics and graphic novels)
Book Notes (authors create playlists for their book)
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

April 20, 2018

Liz Crain's Playlist for Her Book "Grow Your Own"

Grow Your Own

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book.

Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Grow Your Own: Understanding, Cultivating, and Enjoying Cannabis is as entertaining as it is informative.

Publishers Weekly wrote of the book:

"Fun, informative, and stylishly designed, this guidebook positions marijuana cultivation as a legitimate, high (no pun intended) end, enjoyable hobby in the style of brewing beer or growing orchids."


In her own words, here is Liz Crain's Book Notes music playlist for her book Grow Your Own:



Writing Grow Your Own: Understanding, Cultivating, and Enjoying Cannabis with the Raven Grass crew and Tin House was such an artistic, collaborative and sensory experience so naturally music played into it. I may or may not have cultivated cannabis pre-recreational-legalization in Oregon but I certainly grew cannabis outdoors in the summer of 2016 and the summer of 2017 while researching and writing Grow Your Own. What a life. Pretty stinking lucky.

From start to finish, Grow Your Own took us about two years to research, write, edit and design. When we were in the thick of the research and writing of it I put together a playlist for everyone that was primarily based on song titles and lyrics. I thought about using that playlist here, but ultimately decided to put together a more storied playlist for you and our beloved Largehearted Boy David Gutowski.

This mix includes all sorts of songs and musicians that have meant a lot to me over the years. The first three songs are from that original in-book-production playlist, however, because I love them and think you will too. Thank you so much for reading this and listening to my all-things-green playlist.

Every Day I Write the Book -- Elvis Costello & The Attractions, The Best of the First 10 Years

Writing and putting together books is so consuming and it's nice to have fun and enlivening things like playlists to keep everyone's energy up. The first time that someone put together a playlist for a book project I was working on was in 2012. Walter Green, then McSweeney's designer and book designer of my first cookbook, Toro Bravo: Stories. Recipes. No Bull (McSweeney's 2013), made a Spotify playlist for me, our book's editor Rachel Khong (her novel just came out!) and chef John Gorham when we were in the thick of recipe testing and essay writing. It was a generous gesture when stress levels were pretty high. Teamwork greatly benefits this sort of generosity if you haven't learned this much by now. We listened to the songs -- Rachel and Walter in their San Francisco office, John and I in Portland -- while going through final edits and making sure that everything was just as it should be. Or almost everything ;)

Pass the Dutchie -- Musical Youth, Anthology

This song was on a mix tape that I "borrowed" from my brother, who's five years older than me, in junior high. I was just getting into weed at the time and it was such a cool song to me from its sound to its message. I'd never heard anything like it -- kids on the street, so raw, fun and vital. At the time, there were rumors that my brother was growing weed in the woods behind our house but I never found it and he's never admitted to it since if he did.

Lately my brother's been wishing he lived in a legal state because he's been learning more and more about the medical benefits of CBD in particular. We recently had a funny conversation when he was talking about CBD but I thought he was, in fact, talking about cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Nerds.

I can't tell you how many friends I've turned onto using cannabis as a sleep aid as well as an anti-anxiety treatment over the past couple years. Cannabis as medicine (one you can grow your own!) is a topic that comes up again and again in Grow Your Own and along that line we include recipes for tincture, butter or coconut oil infusion and all sorts of yummy things to make with both. There's even a recipe for cannabis-infused chocolate shell in the book. Remember Magic Shell?? Ours actually tastes good -- good quality chocolate and coconut oil.

Pass the Koutchie -- Mightly Diamonds, Crucial Reggae

I had no idea that this original version of the song existed until I put together that original Grow Your Own playlist. It’s funny though because “dutchie” in the Musical Youth song actually refers to a cooking pot, while “kouchie”, in this original version refers to a cannabis pipe. The Musical Youth song removed all explicit drug references. I like to have these two versions together -- the original and the cover. That juxtaposition reminds me of one of my favorite radio shows Chances with Wolves.

Strawberry Letter 23 -- Shuggie Otis, Freedom Flight

My fine fellow DJ Jimbo played this beauty at our wild Grow Your Own launch party last summer at Holocene in Portland. He played a lot great music throughout the night, some of which you can listen to here, and his music combined with all the mind-melty, bold and beautiful art and images that my co-author Nichole Graf gathered and projected over the stage and bar was awesome.

I really dig this song. If you want to check out the Grow Your Own launch party, and all the kick-ass folks, many of them women, who spoke and demo'd and tabled at it, I posted a bunch of photos and info about it here.

Shine a Light -- Shabazz Palaces with Thaddilac, Quazarz: Born on a Gangster Star

Last summer after Pickathon music festival, Jimbo was invited to open with a DJ set for Shabazz Palaces (!!) at Portland's Star Theater. I can't properly relay to you how excited I was when I heard this news. Shabazz is one-big-part Digable Planets with Ishmael Butler aka Butterfly being so crucial to both bands. The Digable Planets have made my heart go pitter patter since they formed in the late 1980s.

The end of last summer in Portland was really stinking hot and also smoky because of a dramatic, destructive wild fire that tore through the nearby Columbia Gorge. My two backyard sativa-dominant cannabis plants, that I grew in easy-to-move 25-gallon fabric pots, suffered through it with significant heat stress. The tips of their leaves browned and curled up and they also got overloaded with ash and particulates from the fire. (Our Grow Your Own Troubleshooting chapter gives you all sorts of info. and insight into tackling this sort of problem, as well as a host of cannabis pest problems, naturally, effectively and organically.)

My plants survived and so did we! And my friends and I have been enjoying their despite-all-obstacles perseverance via our pipes, vaporizers, joints, cannabis tinctures and oils all fall, winter and spring. I remember showering my quite-mature-by-then cannabis plants in water and shaking the droplets off (steer clear of mold!!) before we made our way to the Shabazz show.

At the show, after Jimbo's awesome set, I offered my vaporizer filled with my previous year's homegrown to a couple of Shabazz friends -- they'd been hanging out backstage. We passed it back-and-forth a fair few times and one of the security guards saw us and took it from me later that night. I know that I shouldn't have done that but I'm a wild one and summer tends to get to me. I got the vaporizer back eventually but it took some fancy footwork.

What Cool Breezes Do -- Digable Planets, Reachin' (A New Refutation of Time and Place)

I took a year off in-between high school and college and tried out some jobs in some places I'd always dreamed of. I thought I might want to be a farmer or a park ranger so I worked a couple seasons at Yosemite National Park -- in the general store and housekeeping, and I worked on a culinary herb farm in Spain. I saved up for both journeys with restaurant service jobs in Cincinnati, Ohio. At Yosemite, I made all sorts of lifelong friends. I lived in a tent cabin, slept on a cot, did a lot of solo backpacking, did a little rock climbing and smoked a lot of weed.

My friends Raquel, Cindy and I -- we all ventured to the park solo and became fast friends there -- listened to this first Digable Planets album often when we were passing a joint, pipe or smoking the occasional blunt. I got the nickname Crazy Glasses in Yosemite because whenever I'd get really stoned in the valley I'd put on a pair of these big funny sunglasses. In the evenings, we spent a lot of time standing in front of camp vending machines weighing our options and laughing, always laughing. I wonder why??

Burnin' Up -- Sonny Smith, Rod For Your Love

I first came to Sonny and the Sunsets several years ago when a good friend gave me his debut album right after I'd been through a bad breakup. It carried me through, as music does, and Sonny's music has signified independence and artistic freedom for me since. His music is heartfelt, full of truth and most of it is just really fun. Sonny is all about fun.

I sort of wish that I was stoned the last time I saw him at Mississippi Studios a few weeks ago for this new solo album (So good! Get it!) but I was getting over a minor concussion that took about a month to recoup from so I was taking it easy. Sonny had them turn off the lights completely on stage and in-house a couple of times during the set and that was really sweet. I've never experienced that at a show. It felt so intimate and special.

Mellow My Mind -- Neil Young, Tonight's the Night

Neil Young is one of my favorite people on the planet who I've never met. I feel so grateful to him and all of his music, art, activism and vitality. I get the feeling Neil partakes in cannabis much less now post-brain surgery but it's obviously been a longtime friend to him and his musical creation.

If I listed some of my favorite things to do when stoned the top two would certainly be listen to music and have sex -- preferably both at the same time. I wish I could get you a copy of my Grow Your Own co-author Nichole's sex and cannabis zine that she put together at the beginning of the year and that I contributed to -- Birds, Bees, Flowers, Trees. So many good stories in it along with inspired artwork and poetry. Also, have you read Broccoli? Love it.

Do What You Wanna Do -- Devin the Dude, The Dude

Years ago when I was waiting tables and managing the wine program at a Portland's RIP Alameda Cafe there was a Cuban man who I worked with named Erasto who was a dishwasher at the café and always had one bright and shining piece of advice for me. I'd come in from setting up the outdoor sidewalk tables in the morning, or pass by him when taking out the trash at the end of the night, and he'd look at me, hold up his index finger and say in his beautiful voice, "Only one life, Liz, remember. Only one life."

We're long out of touch, but Erasto's life involved a lot of sacrifices for his family as he'd left his scholarly career path in Cuba to wash dishes in Portland, Oregon. He was always there to remind me -- I was then a fledgling in the freelance food writing world -- that I should dream big, follow my heart and not waste any time. Mostly I think he just wanted me to stop waiting tables and dive full-time into my writing. It didn't take long for me to do just that. Thank you, Erasto. This song would probably make him roll his eyes in many parts, but the primary sentiment of living your own life and blazing your path shines through.

I listened to this Devin the Dude album on my drive back from Olympia the first time I met the Raven Grass crew up there right as we were setting off into our Grow Your Own book project at the end of summer 2015. A four-leaf clover affixed itself to my boot during that first meeting. I'm not exaggerating. We went on a walk and all of the sudden there it was on the tip of my boot. Anyhow, it's a good memory of the very beginning of Grow Your Own.

Rirongere -- Oliver Mtukudzi, Tuku Music

In 1998, when I was in college, I was lucky enough to do a semester of study abroad in Zimbabwe. When we got to Bulawayo for a several week stay I asked a teenage street sculptor selling his wares downtown if he would carve me a fish-shaped charcoal colored soapstone pipe. He loved the idea of that and he did. It's beautiful and works so well. To this day, it's my favorite pipe.

That pipe is actually photographed in all its glory on page 170 of Grow Your Own at the beginning of Chapter 11: Consuming Your Cannabis. That chapter also includes fun things like steps and illustrations for how to make a gravity bong and carve an apple pipe, and it also lays out the ins and outs of vaporizers, dab rigs, and all the other myriad methods for enjoying cannabis.

When the sculptor in Bulawayo handed the pipe over to me a week or so later he said, please be careful when using this while you're here. So I named it Chenjerai which is Shona for beware, be cautious. I fell in love with Oliver Mtukudzi's music during my time in Zimbabwe and this album had just launched so I saw him play from it a few times. If you've never listened to Mtukudzi, and dig this song, I highly recommend finding an album of his. He's brilliant.
 
Didn't I (Blow Your Mind this Time) -- The Delfonics, The Delfonics

I don't have a story for this song (and my other stories have been a bit long so…) I just want it here. It feels right so I'm going with it.

At My Window -- Townes Van Zant, Be Here to Love Me

Nichole and Micah, my Grow Your Own co-authors and co-owners of Raven Grass have a dog named Townes and I used to have a cat named Little Susie and both of those pet names are inspired by the same man, the late Mr. Townes Van Sant. What are the chances? Lil Susie was named after a character in the song Dead Flowers which Townes sang. The Rolling Stones wrote and originally performed that song but I much prefer Townes' version. I really like this Townes song that I've included and hope you do too.

Look at What the Light Did Now -- Little Wings, Light Green Leaves

This is the first Little Wings song that I ever heard and I'm pretty sure I first heard it while listening to Jeffrey Davison's excellent WFMU show Shrunken Planet but it also might have been through an old Arthur Magazine compilation. I came to both around the same time and there's a lot of overlap.

While working on Grow Your Own I learned how very much my co-author Nichole loves Little Wings because I told her about a writing residency that I did at the Sou'wester when on my last night of the residency Little Wings happened to play a show that Michael Hurley opened for, who I also love. Nichole freaked. She loves Little Wings. Michael Hurley actually congratulated me on making so much headway on my novel during my residency that night and that really made my heart sing. I'll never forget it.

This song is so simple and beautiful. When you're cultivating cannabis, whether indoors or outdoors, there's a lot of time and thought that goes into lighting and believe you me we hold your hand and go into the details of that in Grow Your Own so that you know about all of your options. I grew cannabis indoors a bit pre-legalization but I prefer outdoor gardening of all stripes. In fact, in another month or so I'll be planting this year's backyard cannabis garden! I can't wait -- I look forward to my spring-time planting all year. It's nice to have all that I learned while researching and writing Grow Your Own with the Ravens fuel it now. When I'm out in the garden and the light shifts in a pleasing way this song often breezes into my mind. I hope it will breeze into yours now too.


Liz Crain and Grow Your Own links:

the author's website

Publishers Weekly review

Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Food Lover's Guide to Portland
Largehearted Boy Book Notes playlist by the author for Toro Bravo
Portland Culinary Podcast interview with the author


also at Largehearted Boy:

Support the Largehearted Boy website

Book Notes (2015 - ) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2012 - 2014) (authors create music playlists for their book)
Book Notes (2005 - 2011) (authors create music playlists for their book)
my 11 favorite Book Notes playlist essays

Antiheroines (interviews with up and coming female comics artists)
Atomic Books Comics Preview (weekly comics highlights)
guest book reviews
Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week (recommended new books, magazines, and comics)
musician/author interviews
Note Books (musicians discuss literature)
Short Cuts (writers pair a song with their short story or essay)
Shorties (daily music, literature, and pop culture links)
Soundtracked (composers and directors discuss their film's soundtracks)
weekly music release lists

Posted by david | permalink | post to del.icio.us

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